Showing posts with label medicine. Show all posts
Showing posts with label medicine. Show all posts

Thursday, April 20, 2023

SAFE Coalition coordinates for take back the meds day - Apr 22 in Franklin, Millis, & Norfolk

DEA MEDICATION DISPOSAL DAY 💊  🫵 THIS SATURDAY! 
🚗 DRIVE IN AND DROP YOUR UNUSED & UNWANTED MEDICATIONS! 
🎯 Franklin - SAFE Coalition offices, 31 Hayward St, Franklin
🎯 Millis - Millis Fire Department! 884 Main St, Millis
🎯 Norfolk - Norfolk Police Station! 14 Sharon Ave, Norfolk

SAFE Coalition coordinates for take back the meds day - Apr 22 in Franklin, Millis, & Norfolk
SAFE Coalition coordinates for take back the meds day - Apr 22 in Franklin, Millis, & Norfolk

Wednesday, October 26, 2022

SAFE Coalition schedules take back your medications day - Oct 29

Get those old medications our of your house and disposed of properly!
Join us October 29th - it could save a life!

shared from Instagram -> https://www.instagram.com/p/CkHb2GSLV7Y/

SAFE Coalition schedules take back your medications  day - Oct 29
SAFE Coalition schedules take back your medications  day - Oct 29

Saturday, October 15, 2022

Medication take back day at SAFE Coalition - Oct 29

"ITS BAAAAAACK! 
Let’s get those medications out of your house and DISPOSED OF PROPERLY!"



Medication take back day at SAFE Coalition - Oct 29
Medication take back day at the SAFE Coalition - Oct 29

Friday, October 9, 2020

New England Journal of Medicine: "Dying in a Leadership Vacuum"

 The New England Journal of Medicine writes the following editorial:

"COVID-19 has created a crisis throughout the world. This crisis has produced a test of leadership. With no good options to combat a novel pathogen, countries were forced to make hard choices about how to respond. Here in the United States, our leaders have failed that test. They have taken a crisis and turned it into a tragedy.

The magnitude of this failure is astonishing. According to the Johns Hopkins Center for Systems Science and Engineering,1 the United States leads the world in Covid-19 cases and in deaths due to the disease, far exceeding the numbers in much larger countries, such as China. The death rate in this country is more than double that of Canada, exceeds that of Japan, a country with a vulnerable and elderly population, by a factor of almost 50, and even dwarfs the rates in lower-middle-income countries, such as Vietnam, by a factor of almost 2000. Covid-19 is an overwhelming challenge, and many factors contribute to its severity. But the one we can control is how we behave. And in the United States we have consistently behaved poorly.

We know that we could have done better. China, faced with the first outbreak, chose strict quarantine and isolation after an initial delay. These measures were severe but effective, essentially eliminating transmission at the point where the outbreak began and reducing the death rate to a reported 3 per million, as compared with more than 500 per million in the United States. Countries that had far more exchange with China, such as Singapore and South Korea, began intensive testing early, along with aggressive contact tracing and appropriate isolation, and have had relatively small outbreaks. And New Zealand has used these same measures, together with its geographic advantages, to come close to eliminating the disease, something that has allowed that country to limit the time of closure and to largely reopen society to a prepandemic level. In general, not only have many democracies done better than the United States, but they have also outperformed us by orders of magnitude."

Continue reading the editorial online  https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe2029812

New ENgland Journal of Medicine: "Dying in a Leadership Vacuum"
New England Journal of Medicine: "Dying in a Leadership Vacuum"


Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Franklin Library: Myths & Miracles of Victorian Medicine - March 21

Myths & Miracles of Victorian Medicine, Thursday, March 21, 6:30 PM

"Prepare to gasp, cringe and chuckle, as you discover the primitive practices juxtaposed with the scientific advancements that characterize Victorian medicine. 
Janet Parnes of Historical Portrayals by Lady J will escort you through topics that include hygiene, patented “remedies”, kitchen-cupboard concoctions, pregnancy protocols, disease-prevention myths, dentistry and discoveries that paved the way for medicine as we know it today. 
The result is a light factual look at medicine at the time of corsets, calling cards and decorum!"

Franklin Library: Myths & Miracles of Victorian Medicine - March 21
Franklin Library: Myths & Miracles of Victorian Medicine - March 21

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Franklin Historical Museum: "The Cultural Construction of American Medicine" - Feb 10

Our Second Sunday Speaker Series continues on Sunday February 10 with Rob Lawson, Professor of History, Dean College, presenting "The Cultural Construction of American Medicine."

With support from the National Endowment of Humanities and Dean College Department of Humanities, R.A. Lawson, Ph.D. will discuss the history of medicine with a view to understanding differences.

The production of medical knowledge and the practice of medicine, historically, were seen as positive pursuits in which authoritative figures made objective discoveries and applied them dispassionately to their patients. This mirrored widespread beliefs about the sciences in general. Increasingly, however, historians have come to understand medicine as a socially-constructed human behavior that is not purely objective in process or experience. In this lecture, Lawson will explore how the production of, attitudes about, and outcomes from medicine have changed over time.

Professor Lawson, along with Professor David Dennis and Professor Jessica Pisano, are co-project directors on a grant the college earned from the NEH – the Making Humanities Matter initiative. The grant will help develop the History of Science and History of Medicine curriculum at the college. This lecture is derived from their research.

There is still time to purchase your 2019 FHM calendar, full of photos and facts from Franklin’s history. Calendars are available in the museum gift shop for $5.00 each, while they last.

Anyone interested in volunteering at the museum is invited to attend a meeting Sunday, February 3rd at 12 Noon at the museum. Over the course of the year we have need for hosts, researchers, data entry specialists or people to assist in special projects. Join us and share your skill sets.

The Franklin Historical Museum is located at 80 West Central Street in downtown Franklin. We are wheelchair accessible, admission is always free, and donations are always welcome. Visit us and find your history.

Franklin Historical Museum: "The Cultural Construction of American Medicine" - Feb 10
Franklin Historical Museum: "The Cultural Construction of American Medicine" - Feb 10