Showing posts with label FY 2023. Show all posts
Showing posts with label FY 2023. Show all posts

Thursday, July 28, 2022

Governor Charlie Baker Signs Fiscal Year 2023 Budget

Governor Charlie Baker today (7/28/22) signed the Fiscal Year 2023 (FY23) budget, a $52.7 billion spending plan that supports the Commonwealth’s communities, families, businesses, and workers. The budget fully funds the continued implementation of the Student Opportunity Act, while expanding proven programs and making record investments in early education and childcare, housing and homeownership, college financial aid, economic and workforce development, behavioral health care and local aid.

The FY23 budget is in balance, does not rely on one-time revenue sources, and does not raise any new taxes or fees; rather, it incorporates $315 million to support permanent tax reductions that are expected to be enacted through separate legislation pending in the Legislature. Several of the expected tax measures were first proposed in the Administration’s FY23 budget plan filed in January, including an increase to the rental deduction cap, expansions of the dependent care and senior circuit breaker tax credits, and estate tax reforms.

“With the Commonwealth in a historically strong fiscal position, the FY23 budget supports tax relief for hundreds of thousands of taxpayers, while making record investments in education and local aid,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “Since coming into office, our Administration has worked closely with the Legislature to ensure the budget is structurally sound and protected from unpredictable economic fluctuations, and I am pleased to sign another budget that maintains this commitment while making investments help Massachusetts’ families and communities grow and thrive.”

“The FY23 budget maintains our Administration’s strong support for the Commonwealth’s cities and towns and expands services in acute areas of need, like housing stability, education and childcare access, workforce development, transportation, substance addiction treatment and behavioral health care,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “This funding will further our work to encourage the economic growth of our communities, promote equitable access to opportunity and support the health and wellbeing of all residents.”

The FY23 budget incorporates an upgraded $39.576 billion base tax revenue forecast, an increase of $2.66 billion above the total FY23 consensus tax projection set in January. This revenue supports a total of $52.7 billion in gross spending, excluding the Medical Assistance Trust Fund transfer, which reflects approximately 9.3% growth in appropriations over Fiscal Year 2022 (FY22).

As enacted, the budget anticipates a sizable deposit into the Stabilization Fund of nearly $1.5 billion, which would increase the balance of the Fund from an already historic high of $6.9 billion to $8.4 billion. This would represent a $7.3 billion increase in the balance of the Stabilization Fund since the Baker-Polito Administration came into office in 2015 – an achievement made possible by the Administration and Legislature’s close collaboration and commitment to responsible management of the Commonwealth’s finances. 

“Fiscal responsibility has been a cornerstone of the Baker-Polito Administration, and we are proud of the work that has been done over the last seven years to bring the budget into structural balance and build up reserves, which will protect the Commonwealth from economic volatility and ensure the continuity of vital government services in the long-term,” said Administration and Finance Secretary Michael J. Heffernan. “We thank our colleagues in the Legislature for their partnership in developing this impactful spending plan that sustains critical supports for the Commonwealth’s communities, families, and workers.”

The revenue upgrade incorporated into the budget also affords a number of substantial one-time transfers and reserves in FY23, including: a $266 million reserve to support MBTA safety and workforce initiatives; a $175 million transfer to a new trust fund dedicated to supporting high-quality early education and care; a $150 million transfer to the Student Opportunity Act Investment Fund; $100 million for a supplemental transfer to the Commonwealth’s Pension Liability Fund; and $100 million for a transfer to the State Retiree Benefits Trust Fund.

Investing in Massachusetts’ Future

The FY23 budget makes record investments in the Massachusetts education system across all levels, from childcare to higher education. It continues to fully fund the implementation of the Student Opportunity Act with a $5.998 billion annual Chapter 70 investment, along with a $67.7 million increase over FY22 for special education circuit breaker reimbursement for cities and towns and a $89.2 million increase in charter school reimbursement funding. The Governor also signed a new one-time investment of $110 million that will support a pilot free school meal program for students in K-12 schools.

In addition to the $175 million trust fund transfer to support high-quality early education and care, the FY23 budget provides a total of $1.184 billion for the Department of Early Education and Care (EEC). Notably, this includes $250 million for grants to help stabilize early education and childcare providers through the pandemic recovery period, $60 million for childcare provider rate increases and funding to support the full implementation of a more equitable parent fee scale that will result in virtually all subsidized families paying a fee that is 7% of their income or less in FY23.

The FY23 budget also provides $1.61 billion for college affordability, degree completion, and workforce readiness. This funding supports more than $190 million in support for financial aid, which includes an expansion of the MASSGrant Plus program that will enable all low-income, in-state undergraduate students to attend public higher education without incurring debt for mandatory tuition and mandatory fees. The budget also includes over $30 million to scale up college and career pathway programs for high school students with a focus on equity and recruitment of high-need student populations.

The budget furthers supports job readiness and efforts to connect students and workers to high-demand career pathways with increased funding for programs within the Executive Office for Labor and Workforce Development (EOLWD). It includes $28.5 million for the YouthWorks Summer Jobs program, $23.9 million in total funding for the Career Technical Initiative, $17 million for the Workforce Competitiveness Trust Fund, and $15 million for MassHire one-stop career centers.

As Massachusetts’ economic recovery continues, the budget supports the Baker-Polito Administration’s focus on promoting equitable growth and opportunity for communities and businesses across the Commonwealth. The budget provides $32.2 million for the Small Business Technical Assistance Grant Program, which supports diverse entrepreneurs and small businesses, along with $20 million for the Community Empowerment and Reinvestment Grant program, $17.2 million for local economic development projects, and $10.7 million to support Massachusetts tourism and hospitality. 

The FY23 budget builds on the Administration’s efforts to promote equality and opportunity for communities of color with more than $50 million across the budget supporting targeted programs and initiatives aligned with the recommendations of the Governor’s Black Advisory Commission (BAC) and Latino Advisory Commission (LAC). The budget also fully funds the Supplier Diversity Office (SDO), which promotes diversity, equity, and inclusion in state contracting and ensures accountability and compliance with diversity goals.

To continue supporting local communities throughout Massachusetts, the FY23 budget increases the Unrestricted General Government Aid (UGGA) investment by $63.1 million above FY22, for a total of $1.231 billion. A further $20.7 million in funding is provided for Community Compact-related programs including best practices and regionalization and efficiency grants.

Recognizing the challenges of the housing market, particularly in the aftermath of COVID-19, the FY23 budget makes investments to create long-lasting improvements in housing stability and access to homeownership. Building on the Eviction Diversion Initiative (EDI), the budget implements major reforms and significantly increases funding for rental assistance, re-housing benefits and housing vouchers. Along with eligibility expansions that will multiply the number of households served and increase benefits, the budget invests a historic $150 million in Residential Assistance for Families in Transition (RAFT), an increase of $128 million (582%) above FY22, and it provides $59.4 million for HomeBASE, a 129% increase vs. FY22. It also supports $110 million for homeless individual shelters, a 90% increase above FY22, and $154.3 million for Massachusetts Rental Voucher Program (MRVP), which will support enhanced benefits and reforms that will give families more housing choice and flexibility.

The budget sustains support for core health care programs and makes investments to expand services for the most vulnerable, while improving access to health care for all residents. Within the $19.480 billion gross / $7.301 billion net MassHealth budget, $115 million will fund nursing facility staffing rate increases and supplemental payments. The MassHealth budget also incorporates a gross increase of $73.2 million to expand the Medicare Savings Program, which will reduce out-of-pocket health care spending and prescription drug costs for approximately 65,000 low-income seniors and disabled individuals.

The MassHealth budget includes $115 million to support the expansion of outpatient and urgent behavioral health services; further FY23 investments in behavioral health care include $20 million for a clinical behavioral health worker loan forgiveness program and a $20 million for a trust dedicated to supporting the expansion of access to and utilization of behavioral health services.

The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated substance addiction issues across Massachusetts, and the FY23 budget continues to ramp up funding to combat this public health crisis. The budget includes $597.2 million in total funding for a wide range of harm reduction, treatment, and recovery programs that support individuals struggling with substance addiction and programs that work to prevent substance addiction through education, prescription monitoring, and more.

The budget also continues efforts to ensure survivors of sexual assault and domestic violence have access to necessary services and supports, a priority of the Baker-Polito Administration. $132 million in total FY23 funding is allocated for services to prevent and treat sexual assault and domestic violence, a 104% increase in funding since FY15.

Outside Sections and Earmarks

As part of the budget-signing, Governor Baker vetoed $475,000 in gross spending, signed 153 outside sections, and returned 41 to the Legislature with proposed amendments.

Notable outside sections returned with amendment include:
  • Adding the most important provisions from the Administration’s dangerousness bill into the section that would provide free phone calls to inmates.
  • Amending an outside section relating to the Children and Family Legal Representation Trust Fund to require that money in the fund may only be spent on expanded guardian ad litem appointments in care and protection cases
  • Requiring the Health Connector to study implementation steps and costs of a Connector Care pilot program
FY23 Budget Highlights:

K-12 Education
  • Fully funds the implementation of the landmark Student Opportunity Act, adding a total of $651.8 million in new spending above FY22:
    • $494.9 million increase in Chapter 70 funding, including an increase in minimum per-pupil aid from $30 to $60, for a total Chapter 70 investment of $5.998 billion
    • $67.7 million increase for special education circuit breaker reimbursement for local cities and towns
    • $89.2 million in additional funding for charter school reimbursement
  • $150 million for a one-time transfer to the Student Opportunity Act investment trust fund
  • $110 million for a pilot free school meal program for students in K-12 schools
  • Over $30 million to scale up college and career pathways
  • $15 million for scholarships and loan forgiveness programs for public school teachers
Early Education and Childcare
  • $1.184 billion for Early Education and Care (EEC), including:
    • $250 million to support continued stabilization of childcare facilities
    • $60 million for center-based childcare provider rate increases
  • In addition to the above funding, a one-time $175 million transfer to a new trust fund dedicated to supporting high-quality early education and care
Higher Education

$1.61 billion for the Department of Higher Education, University of Massachusetts, and state universities and community colleges, including:
  • More than $190 million to support financial aid, including $18 million to support an expansion of the MASSGrant Plus program that will enable all low-income, in-state undergraduate students to attend public higher education without incurring debt for mandatory tuition and mandatory fees and $15 million for financial aid increases at the University of Massachusetts
  • $22 million in financial aid for Massachusetts students attending private institutions
  • $8.8 million for foster care financial aid and fee waiver programs to maintain support for over 1,400 students attending private and public campuses who are currently or were previously in DCF custody and care, or who have been adopted through DCF
Supporting Local Government

Total investment of $1.231 billion in Unrestricted General Government Aid (UGGA) for local cities and towns
  • $20.7 million for Community Compact related programs including best practices and regionalization and efficiency grants, an increase of 63% above FY22, including $5 million for the Public Safety Staffing Grant Program and $3 million for district local technical assistance
Housing and Homelessness

$884.6 million for the Department of Housing and Community Development, a $300.5 million (51%) increase above FY22, which includes:
  • $219.4 million for the Emergency Assistance family shelter system
  • $154.3 million for MRVP to support more than 10,000 vouchers in FY23
  • $150 million for Residential Assistance for Families in Transition (RAFT), an increase of $128 million above FY22
  • $110 million for Homeless Individual Shelters and $5 million to continue an innovative model to create new housing opportunities with wraparound services for chronically homeless individuals
  • $92 million in funding for Local Housing Authorities
  • $59.4 million for HomeBASE Household Assistance
  • $12.5 million for a collaborative program through which the Department of Mental Health provides mental health services and DHCD provides rental assistance
Economic Development
  • $32.2 million for the Small Business Technical Assistance Grant Program for entrepreneurs and small businesses, especially those owned by women, immigrants, veterans, and people of color
  • $20 million for the Community Empowerment and Reinvestment Grant program to support development in socially and economically disadvantaged communities
  • $10.7 million to support the Massachusetts tourism and hospitality sector
Labor and Workforce Development
  • $28.5 million for the YouthWorks Summer Jobs Program to subsidize summer job opportunities and provide soft job skills education for youths
  • $23.9 million in total funding for Career Technical Institutes, which provide pathways to high-demand vocational trade careers, including plumbing, HVAC, manufacturing, and robotics
  • $15 million for MassHire one-stop career centers
  • $600,000 for a new appropriation to expand research and analytics capabilities to enhance data-driven workforce development strategies
Health and Human Services
  • $230 million for Chapter 257 human service provider funding
  • $115 million to expand outpatient and urgent behavioral health services at MassHealth, plus an additional $20 million at the Department of Mental Health for clinical behavioral health worker loan forgiveness
  • $73.2 million gross to expand the Medicare Savings Program, reducing out-of-pocket health care spending and drug costs for approximately 65,000 low-income older adults and disabled individuals
  • $720.4 million for the Executive Office of Elder Affairs, including $24.9 million for grants to Local Councils on Aging, $7.9 million for supportive senior housing, and $2.5 million for geriatric mental health services
  • Fully funds the Turning 22 program at the Department of Development Services and other agencies
  • $1.2 billion for the Department of Children and Families (DCF), an increase of $368.7 million (45%) since 2015, including $13.4 million to support families that are fostering children in DCF care and to encourage recruitment of new foster families
  • $174.2 million in funding for Veterans’ Services and the Chelsea and Holyoke Soldiers’ Homes, which includes a $13.2 million (37%) increase above FY22 for the Chelsea Soldiers’ Home to support the Fall 2022 opening of a new 154-bed state-of-the-art Community Living Center
  • $15 million in grants to local health departments to support municipalities' capacity to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic
Substance Addiction Prevention and Treatment
  • $597.2 million for substance addiction prevention and treatment services across the budget, an increase of $478 million since FY15
Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence
  • $132 million, a 104% increase since FY15, in support of services to prevent and treat victims of sexual assault and domestic violence, including $1.5 million in new investments to combat human trafficking
Promoting Equality and Opportunity
  • More than $50 million supporting the recommendations of the Black Advisory Commission (BAC) and the Latino Advisory Commission (LAC)
Transportation
  • $1.55 billion in total budget transfers for the MBTA
  • $457 million for the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT), including $95 million for snow and ice operations and $3.4 million to support implementation of new funds provided through the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act
  • $266 million for a reserve to support MBTA safety improvements and workforce initiatives
  • $96.5 million for Regional Transit Authorities
  • $11.6 million for the Merit Rating Board
Energy and the Environment
  • $134 million for the Department of Conservation and Recreation, including funding for the Summer Nights program and the Swim Safe Massachusetts program to enhance and promote water safety
  • $45.4 million for Environmental Protection Administration
  • $30.6 million for the Massachusetts Emergency Food Assistance Program
  • $5.4 million for climate change and adaptation preparedness
Criminal Justice and Public Safety
  • $445.1 million for the State police public safety and crime lab operations, including funding to support the 87th and 88th Massachusetts State Police Recruit Training Troops
  • $12.3 million in funding for the Shannon Grant program to fund anti-gang and youth violence prevention efforts
  • $10.4 million to fully fund tuition and fee waivers for National Guard members
  • $11.7 million for the Municipal Police Training Commission to implement bridge academies, expand training capacity, and annualize training requirements such as de-escalation and school resource officer trainings
  • $5.8 million to support the Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) Commission and four other new commissions created in the Police Reform bill
  • Eliminates all parole and probation fees, building upon the 2018 Criminal Justice Reform legislation which eliminated fees for parolees on supervision for less than a year
Securing and Modernizing Government IT

$163.3 million for the Executive Office of Technology Services and Security to support:
  • Management of Cyber Security Operations Center (SOC)
  • Continued migration of applications and infrastructure to cloud, third-party on-premise, and Software as a Service (SaaS)
  • Continuation of EOTSS customer engagement initiative to enhance IT and security service offerings across Commonwealth agencies 
  • IT strategy consulting services in support of priority state agency and cross-secretariat initiatives
  • Business intelligence (BI) and data analytics support for state agencies
  • Centralized software and IT contract compliance program
To view the FY23 budget, click here

Video of the Governor's press conference when he signed the legislation including the follow-up questions from the press present  https://youtu.be/l_81lhjV3zE

Wednesday, July 20, 2022

MA State budget items for Franklin thanks to our Legislative Delegation

Per email from State Representative Jeff Roy:

Here is what was included for Franklin in the State budget for FY23. The delegation has been strongly advocating for each of these pieces and we are happy to share the results:


  • Chapter 70 - $28,885,721
  • UGGA - $2,862,319
  • 0640-0300 (Mass Cultural) - not less than $10,000 shall be expended for the annual cultural festival in the city known as the town of Franklin
  • 0810-1205 (AGO) - not less than $50,000 shall be expended for the SAFE Coalition, Incorporated to provide support, education, treatment options and coping mechanisms for those affected by substance use disorder in the city known as the town of Franklin
  • 2511-0107 (DAR) not less than $50,000 shall be expended for the Franklin Food Pantry, Incorporated building project
  • 2810-0122 (DCR) not less than $8,000 shall be expended for historical preservation, safety enhancements and related work at the Franklin state forest
  • 2810-0122 (DCR) not less than $50,000 shall be expended for replacement of the playground at Fletcher field in the city known as the town of Franklin
  • 7008-1116 (Massachusetts Marketing Partnership) not less than $25,000 shall be expended for the Franklin Downtown Partnership, Inc. to promote economic development in the city known as the town of Franklin
  • 7010-1192 (DESE) not less than $500,000 shall be expended to communities in the Metrowest region, including the city of Framingham and the towns of Ashland, Franklin, Holliston, Hopkinton, Medway and Natick to address mental health needs in schools
  • 7010-1192 (DESE) not less than $5,000 shall be expended for anti-bias curriculum in the city known as the town of Franklin
  • 7010-1192 (DESE) not less than $15,000 shall be expended for the K-5 anti-bias curriculum in the city known as the town of Franklin
  • 7010-1192 (DESE) not less than $70,000 shall be expended for mental health screenings in the Franklin public schools
  • 8000-0313 (EOPSS) not less than $50,000 shall be expended for a Stop the Bleed pilot program to fund the procurement of trauma kits and bleeding control training for school faculty and staff in the towns and towns of Bellingham, Dover, Medfield, Milford, Millis, Needham, Norfolk, Plainville, Sherborn and Wrentham and the city known as the town of Franklin

 

Jeff

 

Jeffrey N. Roy

State Representative

Chair, Committee on Telecommunications, Utilities and Energy

State House Room 43

Boston, MA 02133

617-722-2030 (w)
508-618-7126 (fax)

jeffrey.roy@mahouse.gov

jeffreyroy.com

For those doing the math, aside from Chap 70 & the UGGA (unrestricted local aid), there is $283,000 specifically for Franklin (excluding the unknown portion of the 7010-1192 (DESE) $500,000 and the unknown portion of the 8000-0313 (EOPSS) $50,000 - 'unknown portions' as both of these amounts are grand totals covering several communities and the breakout is not available).

By my view, both the Chap 70 & UGGA (unrestricted local aid) amounts are more than what was put into the Town of Franklin budget approved by the Town Council in May. You can compare to the voting doc in the budget book posted online ->   https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif6896/f/uploads/appendix_a_town_of_franklin_budget_book_fy23_2.pdf

The audio of the May vote by the Town Council and associated documents for the meeting can be found -> https://www.franklinmatters.org/2022/05/town-council-approves-fy-2023-budget.html

MA State budget items for Franklin thanks to our Legislative Delegation
MA State budget items for Franklin thanks to our Legislative Delegation

Tuesday, July 19, 2022

CommonWealth Magazine: "State budget is a lot more than just a spending plan"

"In theory, the budget is the vehicle used to fund state government. In practice, the state budget is frequently used as a catch-all policy vehicle, a way to use a bill that is guaranteed to pass to further policies that for whatever reason have not passed as standalone legislation. This year is no different, with policies included in the fiscal 2023 budget that range from extending universal free school meals to all students regardless of income to requiring sheriffs and corrections officials to provide free calls to incarcerated people. Lawmakers sent the bill to Baker on Monday. 

Some of the provisions have a clear nexus to state spending. But other “outside sections,” as the policies are called, have little connection to the budget itself.  

For example, advocates for certain segments of the Asian community have had a long-running disagreement over what types of demographic information should be collected when a form asks about ethnicity. The concern is that the label Asian-American is overly broad and does not distinguish between distinct ethnic groups.  

An outside section of the budget states that any government agency that collects demographic race and ethnicity data must have separate tabulations for a huge number of subpopulations, including Asian groups (like Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Korean, etc.), Pacific Islander groups (Native Hawaiian, Guamanian, Samoan, etc.), Black groups (African American, Jamaican, Haitian, etc.), Latino groups (Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban), and Whites (German, Irish, English, and so on)."
Continue reading the article online 

“We think that’s important to provide this tax relief immediately”

"THE MASSACHUSETTS SENATE released a $4 billion economic development bill on Monday that includes some key spending differences from a House bill in areas like education, human services, and housing. The House and Senate are largely in agreement on a $1 billion proposal to reduce a slew of taxes, but with two key differences, one related to the estate tax and another to the timing of when the tax breaks go into effect. 

The Senate plans to take up the bill Thursday, leaving just 11 days for the House and Senate to reconcile their differences and get a bill to Gov. Charlie Baker before the legislative session ends."
Continue reading the article online 
 
The legislation doc can be found -> https://malegislature.gov/Bills/192/S2989

MA  Senate Passes Wide-Ranging Transportation Infrastructure Bond Bill
MA  Senate Passes Wide-Ranging Transportation Infrastructure Bond Bill

Monday, July 18, 2022

Beacon Hill recap: Conf Committee reaches agreement on FY 23 budget; Negro Election Day on Gov Baker's desk for approval

"Lawmakers strike deal for $52 billion budget, including more cash for embattled MBTA "

"More than two weeks after their fiscal year started, Massachusetts legislative leaders on Sunday unveiled an agreement on a $52 billion state budget bill they said would dedicate hundreds of millions of additional dollars to the MBTA, sock away more cash in the state’s savings account, and includes $1.8 billion more in spending than either the House or Senate initially approved.

The $51.9 billion spending plan, which lawmakers expect to pass and send to Governor Charlie Baker on Monday, reflects the state’s heady fiscal times, with tax revenues flowing far above estimates and lawmakers simultaneously racing to pass a separate $1 billion tax relief proposal by month’s end."
Continue reading the article online (subscription maybe required)

The details of the Conference Committee report can be found on the MA Legislature page ->  https://www.franklinmatters.org/2022/07/the-conference-committee-report-on-ma.html

"‘African Americans have enriched Massachusetts for centuries’: Mass. lawmakers approve Negro Election Day holiday"
"Decades before the country’s founding, some Black Americans in Massachusetts could participate in a limited form of self-governance. And on Thursday, Massachusetts lawmakers backed a new state holiday to honor that long tradition of civic power.

The bill, which still needs Governor Charlie Baker’s approval, would set aside the third Saturday in July as Negro Election Day, recognizing the adoption of the first Black voting system in Massachusetts in 1741 — when Black people could still be held in bondage by white slaveholders. " 
Continue reading the article online (subscription maybe required)

Legislative leaders beefed up spending across the budget, including setting aside $150 million more for a trust fund to help cover the cost of a $1.5 billion school funding law passed in 2019.JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF
Legislative leaders beefed up spending across the budget, including setting aside $150 million more for a trust fund to help cover the cost of a $1.5 billion school funding law passed in 2019.JESSICA RINALDI/GLOBE STAFF


Sunday, July 17, 2022

The Conference Committee report on MA FY 2023 budget for your reading pleasure

"The House and Senate appoint three members each to a "Conference Committee" to reconcile the differences between the House and Senate proposals. One member of the minority party must be appointed by each branch. The Conference Committee reports a final compromise bill to the House and Senate for a final vote of acceptance in each branch."

From this link -> https://malegislature.gov/Budget/ConferenceCommittee

You can download H.5050  https://malegislature.gov/Bills/192/H5050.pdf

11A Insides ->  https://malegislature.gov/Reports/13689/FY%202023%20Conference%2011A.pdf

11A Outsides ->   https://malegislature.gov/Reports/13690/FY23%20Outside%20Sections%2011A%20FINAL.pdf

The Conference Committee report on MA FY 2023 budget for your reading pleasure
The Conference Committee report on MA FY 2023 budget for your reading pleasure

Friday, July 15, 2022

Beacon Hill Updates: MA House passes economic development bill; agreement in principle reached by conf cmte on State budget

"The Massachusetts House Thursday night passed a massive, wide-ranging economic development bill that infuses $4.2 billion into the state economy in the form of tax relief, investments in health care and environmental programs, and support to businesses, as well as a slew of policy changes and earmarks for local projects and programing.

The bill would be paid for by a combination of $2.8 billion in federal American Rescue Plan dollars and expected state surplus money, and $1.4 billion in money the state borrows through bonds.

Much of the spending is meant to target “communities that were hardest hit by the pandemic,” Representative Aaron Michlewitz, a North End Democrat who is the House’s budget leader, said while presenting the bill Wednesday morning. “This is a well-rounded spending package that will help support major sectors of our economy and help us be more competitive with other states.”


"TWO WEEKS INTO the fiscal year, legislative budget writers have reached an agreement on the fiscal 2023 state budget. 

Ways and Means chairs Rep. Aaron Michlewitz and Sen. Michael Rodrigues issued a joint statement Thursday evening saying House-Senate negotiators have “reached an agreement in principle” resolving the differences between the House and Senate versions of the budget. 

“Staff are currently working to complete the work necessary to finalize the agreement,” Rodrigues and Michlewitz said. “We anticipate a Conference Committee Report being filed in the coming days to ensure that the House and Senate can consider the report on Monday in formal session.” 

Note - the headline on a similar article Thursday initially read "Beacon Hell", a typo caught by an eagle eyed reader and corrected online before the Twitter post went out. Unfortunately all the email subscribers got the 'wrong' version'. Spell check won't catch those mistakes. I need to be more vigilant.


Beacon Hill Updates: MA House passes economic development bill; agreement in principle reached by conf cmte on State budget

Tuesday, July 5, 2022

Notice from the Treasurer/ Collector: FY 23 Real Estate and Personal Property Tax Bills

Notice from the Office of the Treasurer/ Collector:

Treasurer Collector Kerri A. Bertone has mailed the fiscal year 2023 real estate and personal property bills.  Payment is due by August 1, 2022.  Payments received after the due date are charged 14% interest.

Shared from Town of Franklin page ->  https://www.franklinma.gov/home/news/notice-treasurer-collector-fy-23-real-estate-and-personal-property-tax-bills

Notice from the Treasurer/ Collector: FY 23 Real Estate and Personal Property Tax Bills
Notice from the Treasurer/ Collector: FY 23 Real Estate and Personal Property Tax Bills

Sunday, June 12, 2022

Franklin, MA: School Committee - Agenda - June 14, 2022

Franklin School Committee
Municipal Building – Council Chambers
June 14, 2022 - 7:00 P.M.
“The listing of matters are those reasonably anticipated by the Chair which may be discussed at the meeting. Not all items listed may in fact be discussed and other items not listed may also be brought up for discussion to the extent permitted by law.”

Call to Order Ms. Spencer
Pledge of Allegiance 
Moment of Silence

I. Routine Business
A. Review of Agenda
B. Payment of Bills Ms. Spencer
C. Payroll Ms. Stokes
D. FHS Student Representative Comments
E. Superintendent’s Report

II. Guests/Presentations
A. 8th Grade Civics Projects Highlights
B. Norfolk County Sheriff's Office Comfort Dog
C. Space Needs Presentation

III. Discussion/Action Items
A. Davis Thayer Vote
I recommend, pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40, Section 15A, that the School Committee declare that the Davis Thayer Elementary School property is no longer needed for school purposes, and further that the School Committee notify the Town Council of that determination.   https://www.franklinps.net/sites/g/files/vyhlif4431/f/uploads/discussion_action_b_-_dt_vote.pdf
B. Superintendent’s Evaluation
The chair recommends approval of the Superintendent’s Evaluation as discussed.

C. Revised FY23 Budget
I recommend approval of the revised FY23 Budget amount of $70,220,825.00 as discussed.

D. Meal Prices
I recommend increasing the meal prices for the 2022-23 school year as detailed.

E. Refund of Graduating Seniors' Meal Balances
I recommend making an exception to policy EFD for school year 2021-22 to refund meal account balances over $10.00 for graduating seniors with no younger siblings as detailed.
IV. Discussion Only Items
A. none

V. Information Matters
A. School Committee Sub-Committee Reports
B. School Committee Liaison Reports

VI. Consent Agenda
A. Approval of Minutes
I recommend approval of the minutes from the May 24, 2022 School Committee meeting as detailed.
B. Solutions Gift
I recommend acceptance of a check for $275.00 for in-house enrichment as detailed.
C. Music Gifts
I recommend acceptance of two checks totaling $974.00 from the Music Boosters for in-house enrichment as detailed.
D. PCC Gifts
I recommend acceptance of a check for $1600.00 from the Jefferson, JFK, Parmenter & Keller PCC’s for in-house enrichment as detailed.
E. Parmenter Gift
I recommend acceptance of a check for $200.00 from the Parmenter PCC for field trips as detailed.
F. Districtwide Gift
I recommend acceptance of a check for $285.00 from BJ’s Wholesale Club for districtwide in-house enrichment as detailed.

VII. Citizen’s Comments

VIII. New Business
To discuss any future agenda items

IX. Executive Session
a. Pursuant to M.G.L. c. 30A, §21(a)(3) to discuss strategy with respect to collective bargaining with the FEA/RN unit as an open meeting may have a detrimental effect on the bargaining position of the School Committee and the chair so declares.
b. Pursuant to M.G.L. c. 30A, §21(a)(2) to discuss strategy in preparation for negotiations with non-union personnel.


X. Adjournment



Franklin, MA: School Committee - Agenda - June 14, 2022
Franklin, MA: School Committee - Agenda - June 14, 2022

Sunday, June 5, 2022

Franklin, MA: Town Council - agenda - June 8, 2022 at 7 PM

FRANKLIN TOWN COUNCIL
Agenda & Meeting Packet
June 8, 2022 - 7 PM

1. ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE CHAIR
a. This meeting is being recorded by Franklin TV and shown on Comcast channel 11 and Verizon Channel 29. This meeting may be recorded by others.
b. Chair to identify members participating remotely.
2. CITIZEN COMMENTS
a. Citizens are welcome to express their views for up to three minutes on a matter that is not on the agenda. The Council will not engage in a dialogue or comment on a matter raised during Citizen Comments. The Town Council will give remarks appropriate consideration and may ask the Town Administrator to review the matter.
3. APPROVAL OF MINUTES

4. PROCLAMATIONS / RECOGNITIONS
a. Proclamation - Franklin Flyers Youth Hockey Team
b. Proclamation - Franklin High School Theatre Company
 
5. APPOINTMENTS - None Scheduled.
6. HEARINGS - 7:00 pm - None Scheduled.

7. LICENSE TRANSACTIONS
a. License Modification: Change of Hours - PH Franklin, Inc. d/b/a Raillery Public House, Located at 280 Franklin Village Drive, Franklin, MA 02038  https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif6896/f/uploads/7a._raillery_change_of_hours.pdf
b. New Farmer Winery-Farmers Market License - Crave Mead, LLC d/b/a Crave Mead, Located at 7 Main St., Unit 1, Blackstone, MA 01504  https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif6896/f/uploads/7b._farmers_market_license_-_crave.pdf
8. PRESENTATIONS / DISCUSSION
a. Presentation/Discussion: North Grove Priority Development Area Redevelopment Concept -

9. LEGISLATION FOR ACTION
a. Resolution 22-32: Salary Schedule: Full-Time Elected Official - Town Clerk (Motion to Approve
b. Resolution 22-30: FY22 Capital Plan Round 2 (Motion to Approve Resolution 22-30 -
c. Resolution 22-34: Gift Acceptance - Senior Center ($100), Fire Department ($50) (Motion to
d. Resolution 22-35: Cable Funds in Support of PEG Service and Programming per MGL Ch. 44,
§53F3/4 (Motion to Approve Resolution 22-35 - Majority Vote)  https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif6896/f/uploads/9d._22-35_peg_comcast_verizon.pdf
e. Resolution 22-39: Authorizing the Additional Borrowing of Money to Pay Additional Costs of the
Beaver Street Interceptor Replacement Project (Motion to Approve Resolution 22-39 - Two

10. TOWN ADMINISTRATOR’S REPORT - None Scheduled.

11. SUBCOMMITTEE & AD HOC COMMITTEE REPORTS
a. Capital Budget Subcommittee
b. Budget Subcommittee
c. Economic Development Subcommittee

12. FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS

13. COUNCIL COMMENTS

14. EXECUTIVE SESSION
a. Exemption #6: To consider the purchase, exchange, lease or value of real property, because an open meeting may have a detrimental effect on the negotiating position of the public body and the chair so declares.  i. Schmidt’s Farm, Prospect Street

15. ADJOURN

Note:
Two-Thirds Vote: requires 6 votes
Majority Vote: requires majority of members present and voting


Franklin, MA: Town Council - agenda - June 8, 2022 at 7 PM
Franklin, MA: Town Council - agenda - June 8, 2022 at 7 PM

Friday, June 3, 2022

Senator Rausch: MA Senate Budget Roundup



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Senator Rausch State House Briefing   
Part 2, Chapter 16 (May 31, 2022)   


May is always a busy month on Beacon Hill, and I am thrilled and proud to share fantastic news about how I am delivering real results for you and your community. 

In this newsletter, you will find updates on the fiscal year 2023 Senate Budget debate, my commitments to protect abortion care and prevent gun violence, Memorial Day observances, in-person Senior Coffees, and more.

For real-time updates, please follow me on Twitter and Facebook. If you are a constituent and need assistance, please don't hesitate to contact me and my team via phone (617-722-1555) or email (becca.rausch@masenate.gov). We are here to help.   

I wish you and your loved ones strength, health, resilience, and joy.     

Yours in service,  
 
Senator Becca Rausch   

MA Senate Budget Roundup

What is the state budget and how does it work? Watch my explainer here! 

Last week my Senate colleagues and I wrapped up our budget deliberations for fiscal year 2023, allocating nearly $50 billion to support our Commonwealth's families and communities. My team and I worked diligently to elevate the needs of the cities and towns in our district, and we delivered massive results. Our communities received more than $1.6 million in state funding for local priorities like tuition-free full day kindergarten, public safety communications, senior centers, and water quality improvements. I also secured more than $1.5 million in statewide budget amendments, including $1,000,000 for youth mental health supports. 

These amendments built on the strong base budget that prioritizes you, the people who keep this Commonwealth moving forward. We made major investments in schools, childcare, workforce development, and housing while also boosting state aid to communities. 

Here are just a few components of the budget that will yield game-changing impacts for our Commonwealth: 

  • $1.23 billion in state aid to cities and towns (a $63 million increase) 
  • $6 billion in Chapter 70 state funding for public schools, in line with the landmark Student Opportunity Act 
  • Increasing our state's "rainy day" fund to $6.74 billion to ensure stability in times of economic hardship 
  • $250 million for pandemic-related grants to support early education and childcare providers 
  • Numerous boosts for environmental protection, consistent with the Green Budget, including increases for DCR, DEP, climate change adaptation and preparedness, the Ecological Restoration Program, and environmental justice initiatives. 

Through the amendment process, I secured several critically needed statewide funding and policy measures: 

  • $1,000,000 to fully fund Hey Sam,youth mental health support text line run by Samaritans, Inc. The original idea for the helpline came from my Students Speak Legislative Forum after hearing about my young constituents' firsthand experiences with mental illness. I am proud that my chamber and I delivered to help combat the ongoing youth mental health crisis.
  • $200,000 for a statewide car seat recycling pilot program to reduce landfill waste and support Massachusetts families. 
  • $92,000 to conduct survey research on COVID vaccinations for children in Massachusetts to determine barriers to access and strategy to close vaccination gaps. 
  • $300,000 for the MA Womens Suffrage Celebration Coalition of Massachusetts to enhance their educational programming about women's rights, women's suffrage, and women's history in our Commonwealth. 
  • I also co-sponsored an amendment and spoke on the floor about a policy measure to protect people in Massachusetts seeking, accessing, and providing reproductive and gender-affirming health care, consistent with our own state laws. This is critical if (when) the U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade. 
  • In the wake of increased gun violence and racist, antisemitic, Islamophobic, and anti-LGBTQ+ hate crimes, I co-sponsored an amendment that successfully secured $3,000,000 in security grants for community nonprofits and places of worship to protect vulnerable communities against domestic terrorism. Watch my floor speech about combating hate crimes here.  
My speech on the Senate Floor about the youth mental health crisis and the Hey Sam youth text line 

I also delivered for the towns and cities in my district, securing more than $1,600,000 in collaboration with my Senate colleagues for local projects and initiatives that will have real impact in our communities: 

  • $127,000 to fund and implement full-day kindergarten in Wrentham  
  • $110,000 for food pantries in Attleboro and Natick 
  • $125,000 for a feasibility study for a new council on aging facility in Attleboro 
  • $100,000 for economic development in West Natick 
  • $600,000 for urgent property repairs at Elm Bank Reservation in Dover 
  • $100,000 for electric vehicle charging stations in Wellesley 
  • $5,000 to fund anti-bias curriculum in Franklin Public Schools after an increase in local acts of racism, antisemitism, and homophobia 
  • $10,000 for the annual Franklin Cultural Festival 
  • $8,000 for historical preservation and safety upgrades to the Franklin State Forest  
  • $45,000 for facility upgrades for the Milford Senior Center  
  • $25,000 for backup power generators to ensure the resilience and reliability of the Millis Public Safety radio system 
  • $30,000 to replace the lighting management system at the Millis Public Library 
  • $50,000 for a feasibility study to improve transportation options in Needham 
  • $25,000 for technological upgrades to study water pollution mitigation and support community development in Norfolk 
  • $25,000 to repair and expand the Norfolk Council on Aging parking lot 
  • $25,000 for the operations of North Attleboro's WWII Memorial Pool 
  • $50,000 for a new water pumping and treatment station to access a new water source in Plainville 
  • $50,000 to study and improve the water quality of Sherborn's Farm Pond watershed 
  • $25,000 to upgrade lighting in the Wayland High School Fieldhouse 
  • $50,000 for AEDs at town parks in Medfield 
  • $25,000 for cardiac defibrillators for the North Attleboro Fire Department 
  • $25,000 for the Natick 180 Coalition to address addiction and substance use
  • $30,000 for the Veterans Oral History Project in Natick 
My speech on the impact of senseless acts of hate in our communities

It is the greatest honor of my life to serve the cities and towns of the Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex district, and I am grateful for the partnership of our local community members and municipalities to elevate their needs do a statewide level. When we work together, we succeed. 
 
The Senate FY '23 budget now heads to conference committee to reconcile the differences between the House and Senate versions before they head back to our chambers and over to the Governor's desk. Stay tuned!  

This newsletter was shortened for publication here. To view the full contents, follow this link ->   https://mailchi.mp/masenate/monthlynewsletter-16310762