Showing posts with label disability. Show all posts
Showing posts with label disability. Show all posts

Wednesday, April 6, 2022

Liturgy of Easy Walks: a conversation with Marjorie Turner Hollman - 03/28/22 (audio)

FM #764 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 764 in the series. 


This session shares my conversation with local area author Marjorie Turner Hollman. Our conversation was conducted via conference bridge to adhere to the ‘social distancing’ requirements of this pandemic period.


We had an easy conversation catching up with Marjorie since we had last talked in Sep 2020. Marjorie has just released a new book now, My Liturgy of Easy Walks. More of a memoir than an easy walk guide, she gets into the back story on how and why she developed easy walks in a series of essays as she recovered. 


Let’s listen to my conversation with Marjorie which runs about 20 minutes.

Audio file -> https://franklin-ma-matters.captivate.fm/episode/fm-764-liturgy-of-easy-walks-with-marjorie-turner-hollman-03-28-22


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Links to 


The video links to our walk and conversations around the Sculpture Park in Franklin

https://youtu.be/IBYcPoNICv0   and Choate Park in Medway https://youtu.be/aGrspVpaMs4 


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We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial


This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.

 

How can you help?

  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors

  • If you don't like something here, please let me know


Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.

 

For additional information, please visit https://www.franklinmatters.org/ or www.franklin.news/ 


If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com


The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.


I hope you enjoy!

------------------


You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio with your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"

 

Liturgy of Easy Walks: a conversation with Marjorie Turner Hollman
Liturgy of Easy Walks: a conversation with Marjorie Turner Hollman

Thursday, December 16, 2021

Citizen Comment - about "punitive exclusionary consequences on disabled student"

If you listened/watched the School Committee meeting Tuesday (12/14/21), one of the parent comments was hard for me to follow but could be summarized as:

"Parent with policy issue, allowing schools to use punitive exclusionary consequences on disabled student for having symptom of a disability that they knowingly failed to support while claiming to be instituting restorative practices"

Did get a handout from the parent to share here:

 

Citizen Comment - about "punitive exclusionary consequences on disabled student"
Citizen Comment - about "punitive exclusionary consequences on disabled student"

Thursday, November 4, 2021

“People with disabilities continue to face barriers to voting"

Picked up on a Twitter thread about voting issues disabled folks on Tuesday. Yes, since it was election day, and voting was in progress, the thread was timely.

  • Hi, I’m a disabled voter in Massachusetts - my disability is multifaceted, but one physical presentation is loss of fine motor skill, or the ability to write. I get by in the world thanks to technology. Here are obstacles I and other disabled voters face in Massachusetts
  • I’m a busy parent, and I didn’t fill out the application for an absentee ballot by October 13th this year Obstacle 1 - disabled people must be vigilant about dates that are sometimes hard to find in fine print on websites
  • Obstacle 2 - disabled people must fill out a form (which can be done electronically, with one exception - more on that in a sec), And get it back to the their local election office on time JUST to receive a ballot.
  • Obstacle 3 - that signature. Even though most cities and towns allow for electronic submission and typed answers into the form, MA requires that everyone must provide a  “wet” signature (lol ew ). For me, this is the real obstacle.
  • Alt text for above image: Picture of a text heavy form with the following highlighted: sign your application with a “wet” signature. Application signed with a mouse, stylus, or finger are also acceptable; typed signatures are not.
  • My signature today is legible, however it is wildly different than it looked 18 months ago. The loss of my writing is something I’ve had to grieve, and the state of MA tells me: “Typed Signatures are not acceptable,” right there on the website! Not. Acceptable.
  • Obstacle 4 - We, the disabled voters of MA, must then fill out our paper ballots, sign them, get them into envelopes (no easy task), and send back in time for them to be counted. We are expressly prohibited from returning a ballot to our polling place on Election Day.
  • Text for this image: another text heavy document with the following highlighted: Once you receive your ballot, please return as soon as possible to ensure that it arrives in time to be counted. Ballots CANNOT be returned to the polling location on Election Day.
  • OK so there are the big four obstacles outlined by the state - for me, it’s something I can overcome; I will go to the polls, and I’ll cast a ballot.  I am extremely lucky, and one more MS relapse could take these options away from me.
  • But I did some more research, and it looks like The city of Boston has amazing accessibility tools!  https://www.boston.gov/news/accessible-voting-announced-ahead-november-2-municipal-election 
  • Everything can be completed online, even down to the vote itself, including that pesky signature! In Boston the language is changed to, voters may sign electronically. I was so thrilled to see this happening in Boston!
  • But something was confusing on the website. Why are these accessibility tools only Valid through 2025? And then it hit me. The city of Boston provides excellent accessibility for voting because it was sued by several disability rights groups for violating article 2 of the ADA.
  • None of these wonderful tools were given to disabled voters; disabled voters fought, and won, the right to vote without the significant obstacles I outlined above.
  • So, we have a lot of work to do Massachusetts. When you head to the polls today, try to notice how many obstacles you encounter along the way. And when you get home, check out the amazing work of @BostonCIL and @ACBofMA and @DLCMA, Who fought and won.   
  • Sorry adding the place where you can find all the legal info about voting in Boston. Photo is of text heavy legal document that is also available on the link attached. thank you for reading!  https://www.dlc-ma.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/BAV-Settlement-Agreement-9.8.2021-fully-executed.pdf 


Coincidentally, I found in my inbox on Tuesday that NIST is looking for input and comment to address this disability issue nationally: "NIST Draft Publication Addresses Removing Barriers for Voters With Disabilities" https://www.nist.gov/news-events/news/2021/10/nist-draft-publication-addresses-removing-barriers-voters-disabilities


Direct link to draft out for comment -> https://nvlpubs.nist.gov/nistpubs/SpecialPublications/NIST.SP.1273-draft.pdf 


The chapter headings for the draft are shown as follows:

2. SYSTEMIC BARRIERS TO AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR VOTING ACCESSIBILITY

3. VOTER REGISTRATION AND THE NATIONAL VOTER REGISTRATION FORM

4. VOTING BY MAIL

5. VOTER TECHNOLOGY

6. POLLING LOCATIONS

7. POLL WORKER TRAINING


I heartily encourage reading and submitting comments as appropriate. Together the process needs to work for all of us.


Full twitter thread can be found here (I copied the text and links but not the emoticons...)  https://twitter.com/Moms4Markey/status/1455612963327459329

“People with disabilities continue to face barriers to voting"
“People with disabilities continue to face barriers to voting"


Friday, June 18, 2021

People with ALS Can Get Social Security Disability Benefits Sooner

May was Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Awareness Month. ALS is a progressive disease with no known cure. It advances rapidly and attacks the nerve cells responsible for controlling voluntary muscles. On average, 1,000 people with ALS apply for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits every year.

The ALS Disability Insurance Access Act of 2019 eliminates the required five-month SSDI waiting period for ALS applicants approved for benefits on or after July 23, 2020. The new law, however, does not affect our disability application or determination process.

This past month, we made the ALS claims processing even faster. Our system now automatically eliminates the five-month waiting period for ALS disability insurance claims. Previously, we had to prepare manual awards and send them to our Processing Centers for action—which took much more time. Now, we can help people with this debilitating disease in just a matter of days.

To give a real life example, a claimant with ALS recently submitted to us an online disability application. Using an electronic health exchange, we were able to collect sufficient medical evidence for the claimant and processed the claim in just two days. To learn more about how this process works, please visit our Disability Benefits Approval page (https://www.ssa.gov/benefits/disability/approval.html. 


Saturday, April 3, 2021

Social Security Admin: New Fact Sheets Added to Your Online Statement


Social Security Matters
   
 

04/01/2021 03:00 PM EDT

Your Social Security Statement, available on my Social Security, tells you how much you or your family can expect to receive in disability, survivor, and retirement benefits. We've added new fact sheets to accompany the online Statement. These new fact sheets provide clarity and useful information, based on your age group and earnings situation. They […]
Social Security Matters

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Senate Passes Bill to Increase Higher Education Opportunities for People with Disabilities

Today (July 28, 2020), the Massachusetts State Senate passed legislation which removes existing barriers for students with intellectual disabilities, autism spectrum disorders or other developmental disabilities so they can attend public institutions of higher education. The bill, which passed with bipartisan support, honors the spirit of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which was signed into law 30 years ago this week by President George H.W. Bush.

Under An Act Creating Higher Education Opportunities for Students with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, students would not be required to pass the MCAS, have a high school diploma, meet minimum requirements for academic courses, or take college entrance exams in order to access inclusive academic, social, and career development opportunities on college campuses with their peers. In addition, the bill also makes clear that strengthening access to higher education for students with disabilities is a goal of the Commonwealth's higher education system.

"We have made great strides in Massachusetts to provide inclusive opportunities for persons with disabilities, but there is always more work to be done," said Senate President Karen E. Spilka (D-Ashland). "I appreciate the overwhelming support for advancing this bill and look forward to seeing it make its way through the legislative process. I would like to thank Senators Rodrigues, Lovely and Gobi for their attention to this important issue."

"As we honor the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Senate's passage of this bill today marks another important step towards removing barriers, creating access and opening doors of opportunity and possibility for individuals with disabilities," said Senator Michael J. Rodrigues (D- Westport) Chair, Senate Committee on Ways and Means. "I applaud Senator President Spilka for her support and leadership, Senator Lovely for her commitment to this critical issue, and our partners—school districts and public higher education institutions—for their collaborative efforts to ensure full inclusion of individuals with disabilities within our Commonwealth."

"A little more than thirty years after the Americans with Disabilities Act became U.S. law, I am proud that the Senate has expanded this legacy by passing An Act Creating Higher Education Opportunities for Students with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities," said Senator Joan B. Lovely (D-Salem). "Breaking down barriers to higher education for persons with developmental and intellectual disabilities so they can enroll in college courses and participate in extracurricular activities represents a right and long overdue step for young people of all abilities. I am excited to see all of the great changes that will result if this bill becomes law, and am deeply appreciative to Senate President Spilka and Ways & Means Chair Rodrigues for their visionary leadership."

"The opportunity to attend one of our many state community colleges, colleges and universities and the further opportunities that creates in life is something that many people strive for. All students deserve that regardless of their abilities," said Senator Anne Gobi (D-Spencer), co-chair of the Joint Committee on Higher Education.

"As we celebrate the 30th anniversary of the groundbreaking Americans With Disabilities Act, I commend Senate President Spilka, Chairman Rodrigues, Speaker DeLeo, House Speaker Pro Tempore Haddad and their colleagues in the Legislature for creating opportunities in higher education for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities," said University of Massachusetts President Marty Meehan. "This legislation builds on the university's ongoing efforts to expand access to higher education through innovative programming."

"Now, on the 30th anniversary of the ADA, the strongest civil rights law in the nation for people with disabilities, we at the MDSC applaud Senate President Spilka, Chair Rodrigues, Senator Lovely and members of the Massachusetts State Senate for passing Senate Bill S. 2844, which will open doors of opportunity for students with intellectual disabilities to gain access to higher education opportunities in an inclusive college setting," said Maureen Gallagher, Executive Director of the Massachusetts Down Syndrome Congress. "For too long, public school options for students with intellectual disabilities transitioning to adulthood have been limited and the passage of this bill removes those existing barriers and ensures that people with intellectual disabilities have access to higher education that will lead to more opportunities for meaningful integrated employment and a fulfilling life in the community."

"We are proud that many community colleges are already experienced with inclusive concurrent enrollment programs, and know first-hand that participating students gain life skills and education that increase their ability to live more empowered, independent, and inclusive lives," said Tom Sannicandro, Director of the Massachusetts Association of Community Colleges. "This bill creates a life changing opportunity by breaking down barriers to higher education for students with disabilities. We are happy to see the bill move forward to expand this critical program to more students in Massachusetts."

"MAC applauds the Senate, our public higher education institutions, and school districts for working together to enact legislation that will remove barriers and provide access," said Julia Landau, Senior Project Director of Mass Advocates for Children. "With this bill, persons with intellectual disabilities and autism will be able to participate in college and gain the skills necessary to successfully live and work in the community."

"Advocates for Autism of Massachusetts strongly supports Senate passage of S. 2844, to provide college access for individuals with disabilities," said Michael J. Borr, President and Chair of AFAM. "This higher education initiative can significantly change the trajectory of life for a young adult with autism. Participating in college courses alongside their peers, provides people with autism needed opportunities for growth and community inclusion. The CDC estimates that 2.21% of adults are diagnosed with autism and approximately 80% are unemployed.  Many of these individuals would benefit greatly from the skill sets and much improved employment outcomes that this legislation provides."

Building on the success of the Massachusetts Inclusive Concurrent Enrollment Initiative (MAICEI) grant program, the bill codifies that program, which enables school districts and public institutions of higher education to partner together to offer inclusive concurrent enrollment initiative options for students with disabilities ages 18 to 22. Since 2007, over 1,200 students with disabilities have taken advantage of the opportunity to participate academically and socially in the life of participating colleges in Massachusetts through the MAICEI program.

In response to the challenges facing school districts and public higher education institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Senate bill ensures no additional costs are placed on a school district beyond the existing obligations already required under state and federal special education law.

Furthermore, the bill also ensures that colleges are not required to bear any additional costs of providing individual supports and services for students with severe intellectual disabilities, severe autism spectrum disorders, or other severe developmental disabilities who attend the college through the MACEI initiative.

Finally, the bill delays the implementation of the requirements placed on our school districts and higher education institutions within the bill until the 2021–2022 school year.

The bill now heads to the Massachusetts House of Representatives.

Senate Passes Bill to Increase Higher Education Opportunities for People with Disabilities
Senate Passes Bill to Increase Higher Education Opportunities for People with Disabilities

Monday, July 27, 2020

"Many other barriers also have yet to be broken"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"There are about 56,000 people living in Massachusetts nursing homes, but about 10,000 to 20,000 of them could be living in their own homes. 
That’s according to Paul Spooner, director of the MetroWest Center for Independent Living, who said finding a place to live at home with care - and affording it - remains a problem for people with disabilities 30 years after the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed on July 26, 1990. 
The act doesn’t guarantee private housing, but nine years after it was passed, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Olmstead v. L.C. decision because of it. 
The decision was made on June 22, 1999, and ruled that the unjustified segregation of people with disabilities is discrimination because it violates the ADA, and that individuals have a right to live in their community when appropriate instead of in an institution. But how people with disabilities can afford to live on their own outside living with others - like in institutions and nursing homes - remains a question."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20200726/looking-at-americans-with-disabilities-act-30-years-later--and-during-global-pandemic?rssfeed=true

handicap parking was added to the Town Common (High st shown) and Unions St just last year
handicap parking was added to the Town Common (High st shown) and Unions St just last year
Frank Falvey was the one who asked the question and ended up getting handicap parking at the Town Common. We recorded a radio show (podcast)episode) to capture the event and how it developed.
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/01/fm-197-frank-falvey-handicap-access-on.html

Friday, April 17, 2020

DAV Provides COVID-19 Financial Aid To Qualified Vets

DAV Provides COVID-19 Financial Aid To Qualified Vets

Thank you, DAV for supporting service-connected disabled veterans by establishing the COVID-19 Relief Fund to help veterans who've lost their jobs or income during this crisis. 

THANK YOU FOR A CENTURY OF SERVICE TO VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES!

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/franklinma/files/uploads/memo_-_covid-19_relief_fund.pdf

https://twitter.com/DAVHQ/photo
https://twitter.com/DAVHQ/photo

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Franklin Disabilities Commission: Ability Summit - April 18

The Franklin Disabilities Commission is holding an Ability Summit on Saturday, April 18 from 12 PM - 3 PM at the Franklin Senior Center. 

All are welcome! 

Please see the attached flyer for more details and contact information.

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/franklinma/files/uploads/20200306111229537.pdf





Franklin Disabilities Commission: Ability Summit - April 18
Franklin Disabilities Commission: Ability Summit - April 18

Friday, January 31, 2020

FM #197 - Frank Falvey - Handicap access on the Town Common

FM #197

This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 197 in the series, that we are now developing in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm).

Frank Falvey, creator of two music programs for Franklin TV / Franklin Radio sat with me recently at the Franklin studio.

Frank initiated the creation of the two new handicap parking spots at the Town Common. We sat to discuss how this came to be. Our conversation then stayed within the handicap and access realm to cover parking passes and the accessibility issues at the downtown Franklin/Dean MBTA station.

Listen to our conversation, approximately 35 minutes


https://www.hipcast.com/podcast/HyVQ5HLX




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Links and answers to some of the questions or topics raised during our conversation:

- MA disability placard info can be found online at the MA.gov page https://www.mass.gov/how-to/renew-your-temporary-disability-placard
note: permanent cards are auto renewed, temporary are not

- American Disabilities Act (ADA) was first published in 1990 and updated recently https://www.ada.gov/2010_regs.htm

- The MBTA meeting was held in December 2019. The meeting was held Tuesday, Dec 17 - I was recording the FinComm meeting that night and missed it. Jeff Roy shared the presentation doc which I then posted to the FM web page later that week
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2019/12/franklin-line-meeting-powerpoint.html

- GATRA - Greater Attleboro Taunton Regional Authority http://www.gatra.org/ (you can get there from the "Explore Franklin" link on the Town of Franklin home page)


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This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but I can't do it alone. I can always use your help.

How can you help?
  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors
  • If you don't like this, please let me know

Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements.
Thank you for listening.

For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/
If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com

The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana" c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.

I hope you enjoy!

------------------

You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"

One of the new handicapped parking spots on the Town Common, this one at the corner of High St and Main St
One of the new handicapped parking spots on the Town Common, this one at the corner of High St and Main St


Saturday, June 29, 2019

HMEA receives two grants

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Horace Mann Education Associates recently announced that it has been awarded a $25,000 Learn to Earn Initiative grant from the Baker-Polito administration to design a career training program for unemployed or underemployed young adults with disabilities in the southern Worcester County region of Massachusetts.

HMEA will serve as the lead agency on the pilot initiative in partnership with the Central Massachusetts Employment Collaborative, Work Without Limits of UMass Medical School’s Commonwealth Medicine division, and the MassHire Central Region Workforce Board. Employer partners include Sodexo USA, Cumberland Farms and the Worcester Public Schools.

LTE is a comprehensive approach to providing individuals who are receiving assistance from public benefit programs with the supports, skills, and credentials they need to gain and retain employment in occupations for which employers have persistent demand."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190628/stronghorace-mann-receives-learn-to-earn-initiative-grantstrong

We support over 4000 people with #autism & developmental #disabilities across 110 #Massachusetts communities.
We support over 4000 people with & developmental across 110 communities.

"Horace Mann Educational Associates was awarded a one-year grant for $35,000 from Tufts Health Plan Foundation as part of its smart data efforts for better health care.

This is one of 15 new community investments totaling nearly $1.9 million that reflect the Foundation’s commitment to advancing policies and practices that support healthy aging, including addressing gaps in food access, housing, transportation and community safety.

HMEA is the lead convener of 30 organizations supporting older people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The grant will support HMEA’s work to build health care Quality Measures into an electronic information system, create benchmarks across pilot agencies and convene a learning community to improve collaboration among human service organizations and health care providers. This electronic system is a key asset needed to help these organizations collaborate with health care providers serving older people with disabilities."

https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190628/stronghorace-mann-receives-grant-from-tufts-healthstrong

For more about HMEA and the good work they do, visit https://www.hmea.org/

Sunday, May 6, 2018

Emergency Preparedness Training for Persons with Disabilities - May 10

A special event for Emergency Preparedness Training Event for Persons with Disabilities has been scheduled for May 10 from 2:00 - 3:30 PM at the Franklin TV Studios.

RSVP by May 8 to confirm attendance by calling 508-298-4023.

** The Disability Commission would like to also note that each participant will receive a backpack from the Massachusetts Office on Disability with a great amount of emergency supplies

Additional details in the flyer on the Town of Franklin page
http://www.franklinma.gov/sites/franklinma/files/news/event_for_the_disabled.pdf

or here



Emergency Preparedness Training Event for Persons with Disabilities - May 10
Emergency Preparedness Training Event for Persons with Disabilities - May 10


Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Emergency Preparedness Training Event for Persons with Disabilities - May 10

A special event for Emergency Preparedness Training Event for Persons with Disabilities has been scheduled for May 10 from 2:00 - 3:30 PM at the Franklin TV Studios.

RSVP is required to confirm attendance. Please call 508-298-4023 by May 8.



Additional details in the flyer on the Town of Franklin page
http://www.franklinma.gov/sites/franklinma/files/news/event_for_the_disabled.pdf

or here



Emergency Preparedness Training Event for Persons with Disabilities - May 10
Emergency Preparedness Training Event for Persons with Disabilities - May 10


Thursday, January 11, 2018

Franklin SEPAC: January Workshop - Non-Verbal Learning Disabilities - Jan 18


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Franklin_SEPAC_Logo
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January 2018

Happy New Year!!

January Workshop

Non-Verbal Learning Disabilities

By Dr. Joseph Moldover

Children with these disorders may have trouble interpreting non-verbal cues like facial expression or body language and may have poor coordination, but are strong verbally.

Dr. Moldover is a neuropyschologist practicing independently in Wellesley, MA. He evaluates and treats children and adolescents with learning disorders, developmental disorders, neurological injuries and psychiatric disabilities.  Dr. Moldover frequently works with individuals diagnosed with ADHD/ADD, neurological and psychiatric disorders and cognitive disabilities. He is a graduate of the Institute for Graduate Clinical Psychology at Widner University. 


Thursday, January 18th at 7:00 PM
3rd Floor Training Room
Franklin Municipal Building 
We look forward to seeing you there. 

Parent Support Group
When: Thursday, January 25 at 7:00 PM
Where: Cole's Tavern
, 553 Washington Street, Franklin

We will be providing monthly opportunities for parents/caregivers to get together in a relaxed environment to share stories, make connections and learn from one another.  

The mission of the Franklin Special Education Parent Advisory Council (SEPAC) is to promote a network for parents of children with disabilities and provide a forum to share information and discuss matters of relative interest and concern regarding our children. This group provides regular forums for Pupil Personnel Services and parents to share information and discuss pertinent issues; develops, maintains and shares tools and a resource guide; and raises awareness of children with special needs.

We host monthly workshops educating parents on special-needs topics. We also hold support groups, fun meet-ups for the kids and donate educational supplies to the Franklin Public School Special Education programs. We are a volunteer-run organization and need donations to help alleviate the costs of the above-mentioned programs. We receive our primary funding through an annual "Evening of Comedy" fundraiser that we host in April.


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We are always looking for feedback and ways that we can help meet the needs of our community here in town.  Please don't hesitate to reach out to us via email at franklinsepac@gmail.com, follow us on Facebook at @franklinsepac, and now on Twitter at @franklin_sepac.
Stay updated about our workshops, support groups and events. Get social with us!



Franklin Special Education Parent Advisory Council
355 East Central St.
Franklin, Massachusetts 02038
US

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