Showing posts with label flu. Show all posts
Showing posts with label flu. Show all posts

Saturday, October 1, 2022

Franklin Residents: sign up for the Flu Clinic - October 12, 2022 at the Senior Center

Flu Clinic - October 12, 2022

Hosted by the Franklin Health Department

The Franklin Health Department will host a Flu Clinic on October 12th, 2022 from 1:30pm - 4:30pm at the Franklin Senior Center. Reserve your spot today here:  https://home.color.com/vaccine/register/franklin

Shared from Town of Franklin page ->   https://www.franklinma.gov/home/news/flu-clinic-october-12th-2022

Franklin Residents: sign up for the Flu Clinic - October 12, 2022 at the Senior Center
Franklin Residents: sign up for the Flu Clinic - October 12, 2022 at the Senior Center

Wednesday, September 14, 2022

Flu Clinic for Seniors (65+) October 12th, 2022

Flu Clinic for Seniors (65+) October 12th, 2022

The Franklin Department of Health is hosting a Flu Clinic for Seniors (ages 65+) on October 12th. The event will be held from 1:30pm - 4:30 PM at the Franklin Senior Center.

You may register here: https://home.color.com/vaccine/register/franklin?caledar=7d53f3ff-f19a-471b-a616-db77d3a80110 or by calling 508-613-1334.

Shared from ->  https://www.franklinma.gov/home/news/flu-clinic-seniors-65-october-12th-2022


Flu Clinic for Seniors (65+) October 12th, 2022
Flu Clinic for Seniors (65+) October 12th, 2022

Thursday, September 8, 2022

Schedule to get your flu shot at the Franklin Senior Center Oct 12

The Franklin Senior Center will be hosting a Flu Shot Clinic on October 12 from 1:30 PM to 4:30 PM.

Schedule to get your flu shot at the Franklin Senior Center Oct 12
Schedule to get your flu shot at the Franklin Senior Center Oct 12

Friday, August 19, 2022

Flu Clinic scheduled for Oct 12 at the Franklin Senior Center

Flu Clinic

A Flu Clinic is scheduled for Oct 12 at the Franklin Senior Center from 1:30 PM to 4:30 PM




Flu Clinic scheduled for Oct 12 at the Franklin Senior Center
Flu Clinic scheduled for Oct 12 at the Franklin Senior Center

Friday, August 5, 2022

Are you up to date on your vaccinations, including COVID-19 boosters?


Catch up on vaccines to protect yourself against serious illness.
Medicare dot gov logo

Stay up to date on your vaccines

It's especially important to stay up to date on your vaccines. Vaccines protect you from serious illness and can even keep you out of the hospital.

Talk with your doctor about which vaccines may be right for you, many of which Medicare covers: 

  • COVID-19 vaccines and booster shots. Staying up to date with your COVID-19 vaccines (including getting all recommended boosters when eligible) will keep you best protected from severe COVID-19 illness.
  • One flu shot per flu season. The CDC recommends getting your flu shot by the end of October to stay protected throughout flu season.
  • Two different pneumococcal shots. Medicare covers the first shot at any time and a different, second shot if it's given at least one year after the first shot.

Visit Medicare.gov to see what other vaccines Medicare covers, and talk with your doctor about staying up to date on your vaccines.

Sincerely,

The Medicare Team

Wednesday, April 20, 2022

"We are two months into the outbreak now, and the safety protocols haven’t worked"

"The price of eggs has soared in recent weeks in part because of a huge bird flu wave that has infected nearly 27 million chickens and turkeys in the United States, forcing many farmers to “depopulate” or destroy their animals to prevent a further spread.

The virus has impacted many different bird species, including penguins and bald eagles. But its spread among poultry has been tremendous, particularly among chickens raised for their eggs.

On Friday, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced yet another outbreak, this one in two flocks in Idaho, making that the 27th state in which the virus has been found since February. 

The illness affects commercial birds, hobbyists’ backyard chicken flocks and wild birds, and is spread via secretions and leads to paralysis, swelling and diminished egg production. There have been no human cases of these avian influenza viruses detected in the United States."
Continue reading the article (subscription may be required)

Weekly average price for a dozen large eggs, Grade A
Weekly average price for a dozen large eggs, Grade A


Wednesday, October 6, 2021

Medicare Reminder: It's time to get your flu shot


Stay safe this flu season — get your flu shot.
Medicare dot gov logo
"Stopping the flu starts with you." Medicare.gov linked image.

It's time for your flu shot. The CDC warns this upcoming flu season could be severe, so it's more important than ever to protect yourself against the flu. The best way to protect yourself and keep you from spreading the flu to others is to get vaccinated.

The CDC recommends getting your flu shot by the end of October to stay protected throughout flu season. And, you can get a flu shot and a COVID-19 vaccine at the same time.

Learn More

Remember, Medicare covers the flu shot, so you pay nothing out-of-pocket.

Sincerely,

The Medicare Team

Sunday, February 21, 2021

Remember H1N1? There are more, one is H5N8

"A H5N8 strain of bird flu has been detected in humans for the first time, among seven workers who were infected at a Russian poultry plant in December.

There is no evidence of the strain being transmitted between humans, but Russia has reported the transmission to the World Health Organization.

The workers now feel well, and “the situation did not develop further”, according to Dr Anna Popova, head of consumer health watchdog Rospotrebnadzor. She said the workers had been infected during an outbreak of the strain at the plant."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required) 

Tuesday, October 6, 2020

In the News: "decided a drive-through flu clinic would be safest"

From the Milford Daily News, an article of interest for Franklin:

"Cities and towns have been hosting seasonal flu vaccination clinics for decades. But in 2020, as the coronavirus pandemic continues to rage, some health departments are viewing those annual clinics as dry runs for the eventual distribution of a COVID-19 vaccine.

“I am sure that some medical providers, pharmacies, doctor’s offices, they will all be doing it eventually,” Framingham Health Director Sam Wong said of coronavirus vaccine distribution. “But for a good part of the population, I think it’s still going to fall to the local health departments.”

Wong’s guess is based on precedent.

“Looking back on H1N1, it was the local health department that organized and conducted the vaccination for H1N1,” he said. “Even back then, we used our regular seasonal flu clinic operation as a model for the H1N1 clinic. There’s a similarity here.”

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required) https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20201005/metrowest-area-health-departments-are-viewing-flu-clinics-as-dry-runs-for-covid-19-vaccine-distribution?rssfeed=true

Franklin has a flu clinic today at the Senior Center and plans are underway for a second one to be scheduled. Listen to my conversation with Health Director Cathleen Liberty to get all the details  https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/10/fm-355-town-of-franklin-health-director.html

 


 

 

 

Thursday, October 1, 2020

FM #355 - Town of Franklin Health Director Cathleen Liberty - 9/29/20 (audio)

FM #355 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 355 in the series.

This session of the radio show shares my conversation with Franklin’s Health Director Cathleen Liberty. We had our conversation via conference bridge to adhere to the ‘social distancing’ requirements of this pandemic period.

We covered the following topics in our conversation

  • COVID-19 recap
    • It’s here, it will be, follow the protocols: facial coverings/masks, social distance, hand hygiene, etc.
  • Halloween
    • MA DPH and CDC guidance out
  • Flu shots
    • Important esp now
    • Clinic at Senior Center (slots full already) maybe a second one stay tuned...
  • EEE
    • Low risk so far here

The conversation runs about 35 minutes, so let’s listen to my conversation with Cathleen.  Audio file = https://www.hipcast.com/podcast/HN21x5GK



--------------
Town of Franklin Health Dept page https://www.franklinma.gov/health-department
If you have a question, you can call the Health Dept at (508) 520-4905


The audio of the Health Dept presentation to the Town Council
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/09/fm-350-town-council-mtg-91620-audio.html

The Town Council video of the Health Dept presentation (not yet released for replay but when it is you can find it here)  https://franklintv.vod.castus.tv/vod/?nav=playlists%2Fplaylists%2FTown%20Council.m3u8

Prior recordings
We did record two session back in March 2020, early in the pandemic stages

https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/03/fm-232-franklin-ma-health-director.html
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/03/fm-224-health-director-cathleen-liberty.html

We also did a recording jointly with Board of Health Chair Bridget Sweet
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/05/fm-259-board-of-health-c-liberty-b.html

We also did one in May where we talked about questing and insect borne diseases
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/05/fm-271-franklin-health-director.html


--------------

We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm).

This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.
 
How can you help?

  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors
  • If you don't like something here, please let me know

Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.
 
For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/
If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com

The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.

I hope you enjoy!

------------------

You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters" 

Town of Franklin Health Director Cathleen Liberty
Town of Franklin Health Director Cathleen Liberty


Tuesday, September 29, 2020

MMA: "The flu shot is even more important this year"

From the Mass Municipal Association

"In the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, public health officials and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are urging everyone over the age of 6 months to get an influenza vaccine this year.

Both the flu and COVID-19 are respiratory illnesses that can lead to hospitalization for pneumonia and other serious – sometimes life-threatening – complications.

According to research conducted over multiple flu seasons, people who get the flu vaccine and still get sick have a 37% lower risk of being admitted to the hospital for treatment and an 82% lower risk of admission to an intensive care unit. Due to the risk of contracting COVID-19 in the hospital, it’s particularly important this year to keep flu cases out of hospitals.

After getting the flu shot, it takes about two weeks for the body to develop protection against the flu. That’s why it’s a good idea to get the vaccine before the flu starts to spread in your community."


MMA: "The flu shot is even more important this year"
MMA: "The flu shot is even more important this year"

Friday, September 18, 2020

In the News: get your flu shot now; COVID-19 vaccine will be a wait

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
 

"Think of the doctors and nurses dealing with COVID-19 on a daily basis.

That was Gov. Charlie Baker’s message Thursday after he got a flu shot at a Roslindale CVS and pressed Massachusetts residents to get vaccinated against the flu this fall, which he said will be critical to prevent overburdening the state’s health care system with the flu and COVID-19, which share many symptoms.

Baker has mandated that students in Massachusetts, from pre-school to college, and kids who participate in child care programs, must get their flu vaccine by the end of 2020 but said Thursday that it’s important that others elect to get a flu shot too. The governor said health care workers began talking with his team about a month ago about what it would mean to have flu activity peak at the same time as a second surge of COVID-19 cases. April’s surge in COVID-19 cases came after the bulk of activity associated with the last flu season.

“The point they made to us at that time was from a diagnostic point of view, from a care delivery point of view, from a capacity point of view, having the flu and COVID-19 surge in the commonwealth at exactly the same time would be an incredibly difficult situation for them to manage their way through and they urged us to step up our game — which is already pretty good relative to most of the states around the country — on flu vaccines,” Baker said."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required) https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20200918/baker-flu-shot-push-based-on-health-care-feedback?rssfeed=true

 

"FOR MONTHS, a quarantine-weary, virus-ridden nation has been waiting for a COVID-19 vaccine. It’s become the endgame, the antidote to all the death and economic destruction the virus has caused. Massachusetts’s final reopening stage, referred to as the “new normal,” is predicated on having an effective treatment or vaccine.

But experts are beginning to rein in the sky-high expectations, warning that a vaccine will not be the silver bullet that allows us to suddenly remove our masks and once again hug our friends.
“I don’t think we’re going back to normal any time soon, vaccine or no vaccine,” said Shira Doron, hospital epidemiologist at Tufts Medical Center. “It’s not going to be like everyone gets vaccinated on Monday, nobody has to wear masks Tuesday.”

Todd Ellerin, director of infectious diseases at South Shore Health, echoes that caution. “Many experts don’t think that the vaccine alone is going to get us out of the pandemic,” he said. "

Gov Baker's press conference on Thursday:  https://youtu.be/kUOGMYLhVYs 

Getting a flu shot is more important than ever this year

The best way to protect against the flu is to get the flu shot.
medicare dot gov

Why it's important to get your flu shot this year

Now more than ever, we all need to do our part to prevent the spread of illnesses. The best way to protect yourself from getting the flu and keep you from spreading it to others is to get vaccinated.

Once per flu season, flu shots are covered for people with Medicare, when you get it from your doctor, pharmacy, or other health care provider that accepts Medicare or your Medicare plan.

All places offering flu shots should be following CDC guidance to ensure you have a safe place to get vaccinated. This includes that patients wear a face covering and maintain social distance in areas like waiting rooms. Visit CDC.gov for more information on how to safely get a flu shot during the pandemic.

Sincerely,

The Medicare Team

For additional info = https://www.medicare.gov/coverage/flu-shots






Friday, September 4, 2020

FM #340 Board of Health Mtg - 9/02/20 (audio)

FM #340 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 340 in the series.


This session shares the Board of Health meeting held on Wednesday, Sep 2, 2020. The meeting was conducted via conference bridge to adhere to the ‘social distancing’ requirements of this pandemic period.


Vice-Chair Tim Cochrane opened the meeting and reviewed the usual protocol for conduct of such remote meetings. Chair Bridget Sweet did join the call as it started and also left at 5:30 PM (about 30 minutes in).


The show notes contain links to the meeting agenda, the Board of Health page, and my notes from the meeting. 


The meeting runs about 45 minutes, so let’s listen to the Board of Health meeting.


Audio file = https://www.hipcast.com/podcast/HrcKgsTK

--------------


Meeting agenda

https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/08/franklin-ma-board-of-health-agenda-sep.html 


My meeting notes

https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/09/board-of-health-recap-sep-2-2020.html 


Board of Health page  https://www.franklinma.gov/health-department 


--------------

We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial


This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.

 

How can you help?

  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors

  • If you don't like something here, please let me know


Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.

 

For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/

If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com


The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.


I hope you enjoy!

------------------


You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"

 

M #340 Board of Health Mtg - 9/02/20 (audio)
M #340 Board of Health Mtg - 9/02/20 (audio)

Wednesday, September 2, 2020

"When people stopped wearing masks in 1919 there was a resurgence"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin: 

"Just as Linda Hixon and Shawn Driscoll were finishing their book, “The Grip: The 1918 Pandemic and a City Under Siege,” last winter, another pandemic hit.

They believe that after more than 100 years have passed, the United States should have learned more about how to protect itself from COVID-19.

“I’d have to say we’ve learned nothing from the 1918 pandemic,” Hixon said. “We should have and we can, but we didn’t.”

Driscoll said the 1918 flu pandemic should have taught everyone that local, state and federal governments need to work together to implement safety measures, and decide when to shut down and reopen businesses and schools. But somehow it didn’t.

“I don’t think we’re truly taking the lessons that need to be learned from 1918-19 and applying them to the 21st century,” he said."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)


Monday, August 31, 2020

In the News: some protest against State flu shot requirement; case clusters arising from smaller gatherings

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Hundreds rallied outside the Massachusetts State House on Sunday to protest the state’s mandate for all of the Commonwealth’s students to receive a flu shot by the end of the year.

A sizable crowd had gathered on Beacon Street by 10 a.m.

People who were scheduled to speak at the protest told NewsCenter 5′s Josh Brogadir that they do not want to be known as “anti-vaccine,” but they do want to be able to make that decision for their children on their own.

On Aug. 19, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health announced that flu shots will now be required for all students in the state’s schools, from child care through colleges. Students older than six months will have to be vaccinated by Dec. 31, unless either a medical or religious exemption is provided."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

"Images of packed beaches, lakes and bars have made the rounds on traditional and social media for much of the summer, drawing scorn from those concerned about the coronavirus spreading among those crowds.

Less prominent but also troubling are the growing instances of case clusters arising from smaller gatherings.

Contact tracing yields information about the sources of infections as the USA, by far the world leader in total COVID-19 cases and deaths, grapples with how to keep its population safe while propping up a flagging economy. More than 182,000 Americans have been killed by the disease.

The hasty reopening of businesses across much of the nation after the spring shutdown was largely blamed for a summer surge in infections, but social functions of various sizes among relatives, friends and co-workers may have been a contributing factor as well."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

Thursday, August 20, 2020

In the News: "Flu shot to be required for students"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin: 
"Students across all levels of schooling in Massachusetts will now be required to receive flu vaccines, a new mandate that state public health officials described as a step to reduce the impact of flu-related and respiratory illnesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The immunizations will be required from the age of 6 months on for attendees of Massachusetts child care programs, pre-schools, K-12 schools, and colleges and universities, the Department of Public Health announced Wednesday.

Students will need to get their flu vaccines by Dec. 31 for the 2020-21 flu season, unless they have a medical or religious exemption.

Home-schooled K-12 students and college students “who are completely off-campus and engaged in remote learning only” will also be exempt, DPH said."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

Mass. Public Health (@MassDPH) tweeted at 6:01 PM on Wed, Aug 19, 2020:
A flu shot is now required for all children  6 months and older who attend Massachusetts child care, pre-school, K-12, and colleges and universities. Learn more: https://t.co/VGTRYv0qHC https://t.co/mWCjsZhv94
Franklin radar picked up
(https://twitter.com/MassDPH/status/1296205702625730562?s=03)

MA DPH requirements

In the News: "Flu shot to be required for students"
In the News: "Flu shot to be required for students"

Tuesday, January 28, 2020

"flu season hasn’t even peaked"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"Influenza rarely gets the sort of attention that coronavirus has, even though flu has already sickened at least 13 million Americans this winter and killed 6,600 people. In a bad year, the flu kills up to 61,000 Americans.

There’s a deadly virus spreading from state to state. It preys on the most vulnerable, striking the sick and the old without mercy. In just the past few months, it has claimed the lives of at least 39 children.

The virus is influenza, and it poses a far greater threat to Americans than the coronavirus from China that has made headlines around the world.

“When we think about the relative danger of this new coronavirus and influenza, there’s just no comparison,” said Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of preventive medicine and health policy at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee. “Coronavirus will be a blip on the horizon in comparison. The risk is trivial.”

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20200126/coronavirus-terrifies-us-but-another-virus-has-already-killed-6000-in-us

Can flu be treated?

Yes. There are prescription medications called “antiviral drugs” that can be used to treat flu illness. CDC recommends prompt treatment for people who have flu infection or suspected flu infection and who are at high risk of serious flu complications, such as people with asthma, diabetes (including gestational diabetes), or heart disease.
Find out more about flu and treatments at the Centers for Disease Control
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/treatment/whatyoushould.htm

What You Should Know About Flu Antiviral Drugs
What You Should Know About Flu Antiviral Drugs