Showing posts with label nasa. Show all posts
Showing posts with label nasa. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 25, 2022

Tri-County RVTHS Students Present at NASA in Houston; 2 teams selected as semi-finalists

The Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School District is pleased to announce two of the six teams that participated in this year's NASA HUNCH Program were selected as semi-finalists. The NASA HUNCH Program allows vocational students to help develop important features and hardware for the International Space Station (ISS). Each year a set of approximately ten issues that could help astronauts live more functionally or aid in the scientific and engineering capabilities on the ISS are presented in September. Students select an issue, form teams, and work together on a solution. All juniors in the Engineering Program participate. (www.hunchdesign.com)

The students in the NASA HUNCH Program work with mentors, college professors, national companies, engineers from NASA, and other organizations to help hone their ideas. In addition, each student is encouraged to include their work with NASA on their resume. The students' fresh perspective, time, and energy assists the Research and Integration Office out of the Johnson Space Center. This year each student who presented in Houston received a personalized recommendation letter to assist their future endeavors.

Students worked to provide a preliminary design review in February. After this review, teams refine their ideas and have a critical design review which typically takes place in New Jersey. The finalists are invited to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, to present to NASA and anyone interested. This year sixty teams from around the country were invited to Houston to present.

Thomas Ford (Millis), Timothy Harrington (North Attleboro), Joshua Shockley (Wrentham), and Cory George (Seekonk) were finalists with the mockup of a Destiny module built for transport they created. The Destiny module is the primary research laboratory on the ISS. Destiny's research allows scientists to understand our world better and prepare for future space missions. The students were tasked with researching materials within budgeting constraints and creating a mockup to show how the traveling module would assemble and disassemble for easy transport. The team considered structural elements that would be safe for the public to view, interact with, and fit on a flatbed truck.

Nicholas Aguiar (Seekonk), Zachary Blenkhorn (Medway), Joseph Cady (Plainville), and Aidan Juhl (Millis) worked together to create Magnetic Boots for Space X Human Landing System. These boots would allow the astronauts to walk on the outside of the ship instead of floating, which would enable them to maneuver themselves with their feet and carry items with their hands, similar to how they would work on Earth. "We learned you won't get anything done on the first try- it won't be perfect," commented Nicholas Aguiar of Seekonk when asked about the design process.

The teams traveled to Houston to present their projects to NASA in April. The students agreed that having the opportunity to pitch their idea to NASA and "pick the brains of such a knowledgeable group" were highlights of their trip. The students will now wait to hear from NASA to see if their idea will move forward in the design process.

 

L-R: Kristen Magas (teacher-North Attlebor), Timothy Harrington (North Attleboro), Joshua Shockley (Wrentham), Thomas Ford (Millis), Aidan Juhl (Millis),  Joseph Cady (Plainville), Zachary Blenkhorn (Medway), Nicholas Aguiar (Seekonk), Jeffrey McCall (Teacher-Rehoboth)
L-R: Kristen Magas (teacher-North Attleboro), Timothy Harrington (North Attleboro), Joshua Shockley (Wrentham), Thomas Ford (Millis), Aidan Juhl (Millis),  Joseph Cady (Plainville), Zachary Blenkhorn (Medway), Nicholas Aguiar (Seekonk), Jeffrey McCall (Teacher-Rehoboth)

Wednesday, February 2, 2022

WBZ Radio: Tri-County Students Help NASA Build Space Hardware

In case you missed the piece on the Tri-County students working with the NASA HUNCH program on cable ties for the space shuttle, WBZ did a radio piece of this Tuesday.

L to R are: Maxwell Rounds (Franklin), Tony Botteri (Walpole), Rick Hamilton (North Attleboro), Stacy Hale (NASA), Tyler McKinnon (Franklin), James Gingras (Millis), Brian Belanger (Plainville)
L to R are: Maxwell Rounds (Franklin), Tony Botteri (Walpole), Rick Hamilton (North Attleboro), Stacy Hale (NASA), Tyler McKinnon (Franklin), James Gingras (Millis), Brian Belanger (Plainville)

Sunday, January 16, 2022

Tri-County students complete wire ties for NASA HUNCH Program

Tri-County RVTHS’s Engineering majors participate in the HUNCH Designing and Prototyping Competition each year and was proud to have three teams of finalists in 2021. Their hard work and dedication was evident to Stacy Hale, HUNCH Founder, when he selected Tri-County as one of the school’s to participate in a special project, the designing and building of EVA Wire Ties. These wire ties are used on the International Space Station (ISS) when an astronaut goes on a spacewalk for a repair. Wire ties are wrapped around cable bundles used during battery replacements.

Hale visited Tri-County in November of 2019 to work with the students for three days. During this time students learned the specific and critical specifications required for the wire ties and created a computer-aided design (CAD). The students worked alongside Stacy building, inspecting, and performing quality control measures to ensure each piece was the exact size and shape required. 

L to R are: Maxwell Rounds (Franklin), Tony Botteri (Walpole), Rick Hamilton (North Attleboro), Stacy Hale (NASA), Tyler McKinnon (Franklin), James Gingras (Millis), Brian Belanger (Plainville)
L to R are: Maxwell Rounds (Franklin), Tony Botteri (Walpole), Rick Hamilton (North Attleboro), Stacy Hale (NASA), Tyler McKinnon (Franklin), James Gingras (Millis), Brian Belanger (Plainville)


Tri-County was one of a handful of schools selected throughout the country to work on this project. Our students from the class of 2021 and 2022 manufactured approximately 250 wire ties using an assembly line process. Most, if not all, are currently being used on the ISS.

Hale returned to Tri-County to have a storage locker used in the ISS signed. The honor is used to recognize the hard work and dedication during the manufacturing. The storage lockers are filled with goods that are being shipped up to the ISS and then used to send refuse back to Earth.

 

  • What is NASA HUNCH?  

NASA High School Students United with NASA to Create Hardware (HUNCH) Program 

The HUNCH mission is to empower and inspire students through a Project Based Learning program where high school students learn 21st century skills and have the opportunity to launch their careers through the participation in the design and fabrication of real world valued products for NASA.  Find out more on the NASA HUNCH web page -> https://nasahunch.com/

Monday, May 31, 2021

Tri-County Students Selected as Finalists in NASA HUNCH Program

The Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School District is pleased to announce all six teams that participated in this year's NASA HUNCH Program were selected as semi-finalists. The NASA HUNCH Program asks vocational students to help solve problems facing astronauts. Each year a set of approximately ten issues are presented in September. Students select the issue they would like to work on and form teams. All juniors in the Engineering Program participate. (www.hunchdesign.com)

The students in the NASA HUNCH Program work with mentors, college professors, national companies, engineers from NASA, and other organizations to help hone their ideas. In addition, each student is encouraged to include their work with NASA on their resume. The students' fresh perspective, time, and energy assists the Research and Integration Office out of the Johnson Space Center.

This year, the students worked to provide a preliminary design review in February. After this review, teams refine their ideas and have a critical design review. Critical Design Review typically takes place in New Jersey but was held remotely this year. The finalists are invited to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, to present to NASA and anyone interested. 
 
This year the students will be presenting virtually but, Kristen Magas, an Engineering Teacher, hopes this will give them a wider audience of people who typically wouldn't be able to attend the presentation in person. "I wish these kids could have the experience of going to Houston to work with NASA, hopefully being recognized and having a chance to present virtually to anyone at Johnson Space Center will be memorable," says Kristen Magas, Engineering Technology Instructor.

The three teams of finalists include:
  • Matt Gorton (Seekonk), John Greener (North Attleboro), Rick Hamilton (North Attleboro), Emily Anne Matheson (Medway), Tyler Fiore (North Attleboro), Shriya Sivakumar (Seekonk), Kyle Hughes (North Attleboro) created a No Heat Shield, allowing a package to reenter the atmosphere without burning up safely. In addition, this team was able to work with a local fire department to drop test their prototypes from the top of a fire truck ladder and got licensed as HAM radio operators to test their radio transmitter.
  • Owen Fedele (Medway), Lucas Celeste (North Attleboro), Nolan Angliss (Franklin) designed a Lunar Food Bite Dispenser to allow astronauts to eat while on long spacewalks with ease. This trio was selected as finalists last year as well.
  • Anthony Botteri (Medway), Max Rounds (Franklin), James Gingras (Millis), Brian Belanger (Plainville), Tyler McKinnon (Franklin) (with help from Elijah DePaolo (North Attleboro) and Eric Conway (Millis) collaborated on the Lunar Dust Baffle to help keep lunar soil on habitats to protect astronauts from radiation and micrometeorites. This team pulled together their various strengths and made an incredible impact.
The teams presented their projects to NASA in late April. Next steps include one team developing their idea or blending ideas to create a solution. Through the HUNCH Program, Tri-County designed hardware for storage lockers used in space by the Advanced Manufacturing students.

 
Lunar Food Bite Dispenser
Lunar Food Bite Dispenser

Lunar Dust Baffle
Lunar Dust Baffle

No Heat Shield
No Heat Shield

 

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Tri-County NASA-HUNCH Team Designs Device to Travel to Space

Three students in the Engineering Technology Program and their instructor at Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School traveled to Houston, TX last week from April 15 through April 17, 2019 to present a device they designed to NASA engineers and astronauts as part of the HUNCH program.

High School Students United with NASA to Create Hardware or HUNCH is an innovative school-based program that partners NASA at Johnson Space Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, Langley Research Center, Goddard Space Flight Center, Glenn Research Center, Kennedy Space Center, and AMES Research Center with high schools in states across the nation. The partnership involves students fabricating real-world products for NASA as they apply their Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) skills as well as learning to collaborate and administer a project in teams and think creatively.

Five juniors Averi Ayre of North Attleboro; Katie Dion of North Attleboro; Colin Donoghue of Walpole; Eric Kugler of North Attleboro; and Jacob Lipson of Franklin designed, The Tool Pouch, an organized tool storage box that they hope will be used to solve a tool storage problem on the International Space Station. The project has made it to the Final Design and Prototyping Review scheduled at NASA’s Johnson Space Center at Rocket Park in Houston. If selected, their designs will likely be used by NASA astronauts in Space. This is the fourth year Tri-County’s team attended the event.

NASA began HUNCH 13 years ago with schools in Texas, and later expanded to some schools in the Midwest. In 2011, they added a school from the Northeast. NASA enlisted the help of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to identify the school, and they recommended Tri-County.

The Design and Prototyping HUNCH Program is a way for students of all skill levels to develop innovative solutions to problems posed by life on the International Space Station. Many of the projects are items personally requested by the International Space Station crew to help ease living conditions aboard the station, giving students the opportunity to really make an impact on the lives of astronauts. Other projects come from Flight Crew Systems and Operational groups at NASA that need more idea development.


Tri-County RVTHS, located at 147 Pond Street in Franklin, is a recipient of the High Schools That Work Gold Achievement Award and serves the communities of Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Norfolk, North Attleboro, Plainville, Seekonk, Sherborn, Walpole, and Wrentham.
In photo from l-r are: Eric Kugler, Jacob Lipson, Katie Dion, Averi Ayre, Colin Donoghue, and Mrs. Magas
In photo from l-r are: Eric Kugler, Jacob Lipson, Katie Dion, Averi Ayre, Colin Donoghue, and Mrs. Magas

Friday, September 12, 2014

In the News: Tri-County NASA connection


For another year, a select group of Tri-County Regional Vocational High School students have been named official employees of NASA, joining other schools from across the country to design and build technology that may one day be used on the International Space Station. 
NASA accepted Tri-County into the High School Students United with NASA to Create Hardware (HUNCH) program in 2011, and for the past three years, teams of science and engineering students have been developing projects to test in zero gravity.  
Tri-county Regional Voc Tech
Tri-county Regional Voc Tech
Last April, six seniors traveled to Ellington Field in Houston, Texas, to try out their mass flow meter — a device that measures the mass flow rate of a fluid as it moves through a tube — aboard a zero gravity plane. 
This year, 15 seniors and 22 juniors will start new projects or continue work they started last year, such as a mixer for fresh foods that must work in zero gravity.
Continue reading the article in the Milford Daily News (subscription maybe required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/article/20140912/NEWS/140918556/1994/NEWS