Showing posts with label science. Show all posts
Showing posts with label science. Show all posts

Friday, May 28, 2021

"COVID-19 symptoms commonly persisted beyond the acute phase of infection, with implications for health-associated functioning and quality of life"

While COVID-19 restrictions are easing, the disease and lasting effects remain to be reckoned with. 

Via Nature.com:  "Count the cost of disability caused by COVID-19

"The COVID-19 pandemic is well into its second year, but countries are only beginning to grapple with the lasting health crisis. In March, a UK consortium reported that 1 in 5 people who were hospitalized with the disease had a new disability after discharge1. A large US study found similar effects for both hospitalized and non-hospitalized people2. Among adults who were not hospitalized, 1 in 10 have ongoing symptoms 12 weeks after a positive test3. Treatment services for the long-term consequences of COVID-19 are already having to be absorbed into health and care systems urgently. Tackling this requires a much clearer picture of the burden of the disease than currently exists.

Tracking disease cases and deaths has advantages in a health emergency — they are easily collated, and, to some extent, trends can be compared across countries. But continuing the use of such simplified metrics heightens the risks of underestimating the true health impact on a population. It focuses policy and public discourse on the immediate prevention of deaths and on the economic impact of lockdown policies, ignoring the long-term disease-related disabilities that will also affect well-being and productivity."

Continue reading the article online 

Via Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA): "Assessment of the Frequency and Variety of Persistent Symptoms Among Patients With COVID-19"
Question  What are the frequency and variety of persistent symptoms after COVID-19 infection?

Findings  In this systematic review of 45 studies including 9751 participants with COVID-19, the median proportion of individuals who experienced at least 1 persistent symptom was 73%; symptoms occurring most frequently included shortness of breath or dyspnea, fatigue or exhaustion, and sleep disorders or insomnia. However, the studies were highly heterogeneous and needed longer follow-up and more standardized designs.

Meaning  This systematic review found that COVID-19 symptoms commonly persisted beyond the acute phase of infection, with implications for health-associated functioning and quality of life; however, methodological improvements are needed to reliably quantify these risks.
Continue reading the article online 

Monday, April 26, 2021

"You distinguish between science that’s objectively established as true and science on the frontier"

"Neil deGrasse Tyson is perhaps the country’s best-known popularizer of science. The astrophysicist, who is 62, has achieved that status through his ever-expanding body of work in television, podcasting, journalism, social media and books (his latest is the new “Cosmic Queries”) and as director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. 
He has done so at a time when, distressingly, skepticism toward established science has become increasingly widespread. Tyson himself received some scrutiny in 2019 after he was subject to two claims of sexual misconduct, which he subsequently described as misunderstandings. Those claims were investigated by his employers at the museum as well as Fox Broadcasting and National Geographic, which respectively air his series “Cosmos” and “StarTalk”; all three of them decided to continue employing Tyson. 
“We’ve lost confidence in our civic entities,” Tyson says about declining public trust in science. “That’s a strong destabilizing force, and some of that spilled over into the scientific community.”
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2021/04/19/magazine/neil-degrasse-tyson-interview.html

Neil deGrasse Tyson at the Rose Center at the American Museum of Natural History in New York in 2006. He has been the director of the Hayden Planetarium since 1996. Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times
Neil deGrasse Tyson at the Rose Center at the American Museum of Natural History in New York in 2006. He has been the director of the Hayden Planetarium since 1996. Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times


Monday, March 29, 2021

Next year juniors/seniors in high school - check out the CDC Museum Disease Detective Camp


"Do you know a rising high school junior or senior interested in public health? @CDCgov Disease Detective Camp is an incredible experience, and this year it is offering a new, web-based Public Health Academy for remote learners!"

"All students to who will be high-school juniors or seniors during the 2021-2022 school year and at least 16 years old on the first day of the camp session to which they are accepted.

As the CDC Museum remains closed due to COVID-19 precautions, we are not able to predict yet if in-person programming will be available the summer of 2021. If the museum is not reopened for in-person programming, the CDC Museum will offer only online courses. A final decision on in-person programming will be made May 3, 2021; all applicants will be notified of the decision by email."

Details and reg links:  https://t.co/z1Fk2qnM9a
Shared from Twitter: https://twitter.com/dmaccannell/status/1376196094632267778

Next year juniors/seniors in high school - check out the CDC Museum Disease Detective Camp
Next year juniors/seniors in high school - check out the CDC Museum Disease Detective Camp


Tuesday, March 16, 2021

National News: CDC review of documents; AI and the bias issue

"Federal health officials have identified several controversial pandemic recommendations released during the Donald Trump administration that they say were “not primarily authored” by staff and don’t reflect the best scientific evidence, based on a review ordered by its new director.

The review identified three documents that had already been removed from the agency’s website: One, released in July, delivered a strong argument for school reopenings and downplayed health risks. A second set of guidelines about the country’s reopening was released in April by the White House and was far less detailed than what had been drafted by the CDC and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. A third guidance issued in August discouraged the testing of people without covid-19 symptoms even when they had contact with infected individuals. That was replaced in September after experts inside and outside the agency raised alarms."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)


"Hundreds of people gathered for the first lecture at what had become the world’s most important conference on artificial intelligence — row after row of faces. Some were East Asian, a few were Indian, and a few were women. But the vast majority were white men. More than 5,500 people attended the meeting, five years ago in Barcelona, Spain.

Timnit Gebru, then a graduate student at Stanford University, remembers counting only six Black people other than herself, all of whom she knew, all of whom were men.

The homogeneous crowd crystallized for her a glaring issue. The big thinkers of tech say A.I. is the future. It will underpin everything from search engines and email to the software that drives our cars, directs the policing of our streets and helps create our vaccines."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

Tuesday, February 23, 2021

National News Highlights

  • Supreme Court Denies Trump’s Bid to Conceal Taxes, Financial Records - The New York Times
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required) 

  • Fauci: US political divide over masks led to half a million COVID-19 deaths

  • Biden honors covid-19 victims amid staggering toll, signs of hope
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required) 


President Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Harris and second gentleman Doug Emhoff observe a moment of silence at the White House Monday. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)
President Biden, first lady Jill Biden, Vice President Harris and second gentleman Doug Emhoff observe a moment of silence at the White House Monday. (Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)


Thursday, February 11, 2021

JAMA Insights: "Effectiveness of Mask Wearing to Control Community Spread of SARS-CoV-2"

Here's the data: 
"Prior to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the efficacy of community mask wearing to reduce the spread of respiratory infections was controversial because there were solid relevant data to support their use. During the pandemic, the scientific evidence has increased. Compelling data now demonstrate that community mask wearing is an effective nonpharmacologic intervention to reduce the spread of this infection, especially as source control to prevent spread from infected persons, but also as protection to reduce wearers’ exposure to infection.

COVID-19 spreads primarily through respiratory droplets exhaled when infected people breathe, talk, cough, sneeze, or sing. Most of these droplets are smaller than 10 μm in diameter, often referred to as aerosols. The amount of small droplets and particles increases with the rate and force of airflow during exhalation (eg, shouting, vigorous exercise). Exposure is greater the closer a person is to the source of exhalations. Larger droplets fall out of the air rapidly, but small droplets and the dried particles formed from them (ie, droplet nuclei) can remain suspended in the air. In circumstances with poor ventilation, typically indoor enclosed spaces where an infected person is present for an extended period, the concentrations of these small droplets and particles can build sufficiently to transmit infection."'

Continue reading the Article in the Journal of  American Medicine Association (JAMA)  https://t.co/x8sTs9y8Rw


Effectiveness of Mask Wearing to Control Community Spread of SARS-CoV-2
Effectiveness of Mask Wearing to Control Community Spread of SARS-CoV-2


Tuesday, January 19, 2021

Boston Globe: "As the planet warms faster, scientists study controversial ways to lower temperatures"


"As the planet continues to warm at an accelerating rate, scientists are looking into a potential insurance policy, a radical way of curbing climate change by altering the climate system itself.

A team at Harvard University this summer plans to conduct the first of a series of highly controversial tests of what’s known as solar geoengineering, a way to reduce global warming by spreading particles in the atmosphere to reflect sunlight back into space.   
If an advisory board authorizes them to proceed, the scientists plan to travel in June to a remote part of northern Sweden, where they’ll launch a giant balloon into the stratosphere to test whether they can adequately maneuver an instrument-filled gondola suspended below. If all goes well, the team later this year plans for the first time to inject a small amount of calcium carbonate — a common substance found in rocks — into the atmosphere to better understand how the chemical compound might be used to moderate temperatures on the ground."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

Saturday, December 19, 2020

"the meltdown happened one Zoom meeting at a time"

Tracy O'Connell Novick (@TracyNovick) shared a lengthy Slate article on the school re-opening debate.
 
"How the School Reopening Debate Is Tearing One of America’s Most Elite Suburbs Apart"
"It was mid-August. The playgrounds of Brookline, Massachusetts, had finally reopened, and so the news spread fast. Sharon Abramowitz had resigned from the school committee. If a lab wanted to manufacture a school committee member to help the 7,800-student Brookline School District through the COVID crisis, it probably would’ve ended up with Abramowitz. The sociologist-anthropologist-epidemiologist had studied Ebola, written interagency guidelines about what community engagement should look like during a crisis, and, after the district shut down in March, spent 40 hours a week in volunteer meetings on Zoom trying to make a safe reopening feasible. But now she was moving full time to her second home in Vermont.

As summer turned into fall, the school district was melting down. Parents largely wanted their kids learning in person, but it looked like Brookline wasn’t going to pull it off, even though the wealthy town just outside of Boston probably has the highest infectious-disease-expert-per-capita rate in the country. Abramowitz was fed up. “Sorry to be all UNICEF about it,” Abramowitz, who does work for UNICEF, said when we spoke in September, “but education is a fundamental human right for all children.”
Continue reading the article

Tracy's tweet:  https://t.co/Ds3udHGj4l

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Scientific American: “science, health, the environment, evidence-based policy, and reality over disinformation."

From the Boston Globe, an article of interest for Franklin:

"Scientific American, the magazine that has delved into scientific topics for 175 years, is endorsing a presidential candidate for the first time, picking Democrat Joe Biden over Republican incumbent President Donald Trump.

“The evidence and the science show that Donald Trump has badly damaged the U.S. and its people—because he rejects evidence and science,” the magazine’s editorial said. “The most devastating example is his dishonest and inept response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which cost more than 190,000 Americans their lives by the middle of September. He has also attacked environmental protections, medical care, and the researchers and public science agencies that help this country prepare for its greatest challenges.”

The magazine said it was urging people to vote for Biden, “who is offering fact-based plans to protect our health, our economy and the environment. These and other proposals he has put forth can set the country back on course for a safer, more prosperous and more equitable future.”

“It’s time to move Trump out and elect Biden, who has a record of following the data and being guided by science,” the magazine said.

Laura Helmuth, the magazine’s editor-in-chief tweeted that a vote for Biden would support “science, health, the environment, evidence-based policy, and reality over disinformation."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/09/15/nation/scientific-american-makes-its-first-endorsement-its-history-picking-joe-biden/

Scientific American editorial  https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientific-american-endorses-joe-biden/

We’ve never backed a presidential candidate in our 175-year history—until now
"We’ve never backed a presidential candidate in our 175-year history—until now"


Monday, July 13, 2020

"I urge them to listen to the science and act now before it’s too late"

“The fact that the responsibility to communicate this falls on me and other children should be seen for exactly what it is –a failure beyond all imagination” 
I tried summarising the #climatecrisis from my own experiences in 12 chapters. Full text in @TIME

The link to Greta Thunberg's article in Time:  https://t.co/AfAocy7Red?amp=1
The article/essay chronicles her trip to the US via sail boat and then to Davos.

Franklin radar picked this up via Twitter:   https://twitter.com/GretaThunberg/status/1282243518853984259?s=09

Why? There is a small but active climate group here in Franklin, and there is a whole lot of us who pay attention far less often than perhaps we should. I read her article and I found it explains our problem succinctly, more so than anything else I have found. She suggests that we choose to follow the science and even if we do, we have little time left to act. How little? Maybe 6 or 7 years.
.
So as with many things I share here, I present the info, you make the choice to read, or not, and if you read, then maybe you can act upon the info. Greta writes: 
"if you read between the lines you realise that we are facing the need to make changes which are unprecedented in human history."


From Chapter 6:
"So, in short: the temperature increases, the damaging mountain pine beetle survives the winter and dramatically increases in population. The trees die and turn into wildfire fuel which intensifies the wildfires even further. The soot from those fires makes the surface of the glaciers turn darker and the melting process speeds up even faster. 
This is a textbook example of a reinforcing chain reaction, which in itself is just a small part of a much larger holistic pattern connected to our emissions of greenhouse gases. 
There are countless other tipping points and chain reactions. Some have not yet happened. And some are very much a reality already today. Such as the release of methane due to thawing permafrost or other phenomena linked to deforestation, dying coral reefs, weakening or changing ocean currents, algae growing on the Antarctic ice, increasing ocean temperatures, changes in monsoon patterns and so on."
https://time.com/5863684/greta-thunberg-diary-climate-crisis/

Thunberg arrives in New York City after a 15-day journey crossing the Atlantic on Aug. 28, 2019. Courtesy of Greta Thunberg
Thunberg arrives in New York City after a 15-day journey crossing the Atlantic on Aug. 28, 2019. Courtesy of Greta Thunberg

Friday, July 10, 2020

Leave it to Bill Nye

Leave it to Bill Nye, The Science Guy, to make a simple and effective explanation on why to wear a facial covering (mask).



From the Franklin radar via Twitter:
https://twitter.com/ReignOfApril/status/1281206861442801664?s=09

For more about Bill Nye visit his web page  https://billnye.com/

https://twitter.com/ErickHBMC/status/1281129712320839680
https://twitter.com/ErickHBMC/status/1281129712320839680

Friday, April 24, 2020

In the News: Charles River Meadowlands study completed

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"After nearly two years of effort, the Beta Group recently completed a draft study of the Charles River Meadowlands in Bellingham, Franklin and Medway.

“Joining three communities around a shared natural asset, the Charles River Meadowlands, is what this project is all about,” said Kelly R. Carr, senior associate at BETA Group, Inc., the consulting firm that conducted the study.

Dating to early meetings in 2016, the Meadowlands Initiative (www.charlesrivermeadowlands.org) has sought to bring focus and awareness to the hundreds of acres of public wetlands and borderlands controlled by the US Army Corps of Engineers in the three towns.

Originally acquired in the 1970s and 1980s for flood control, and incorporated in the Charles River Natural Valley Storage Area, the region has been gradually walled off from the public by roadways and rapid private development. However, each of the towns has land holdings for conservation and other purposes that abut the federal lands, effectively creating a large natural sanctuary similar in scale to the Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in Concord."

https://franklin.wickedlocal.com/news/20200422/charles-river-meadowlands-study-completed

View a copy of the full report:
https://3c2eb8ef-bdd5-452c-ac1c-90b53ffa5b46.filesusr.com/ugd/2fc87e_2111508ad75f4b71a15471c7c14ec28f.pdf




In the News: Charles River Meadowlands study completed
In the News: Charles River Meadowlands study completed

Monday, March 18, 2019

Annual Family Science Night - March 21

Do you (or kids you know) like fun? Dinosaurs?? Science??? 

Come out to FHS to enjoy all 3 at the same time!! It's going to be a roaring good time! Thursday, March 21 from 6 - 8 PM.


Annual Family Science Night - March 21
Annual Family Science Night - March 21


This was shared via Twitter

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

In the News: EPA pulls scientists before talk; NYC forecast to get flood waters more frequently

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"Scientists at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency contributed research to “The State of Narragansett Bay and Its Watershed,” but at the 11th hour the federal agency canceled presentations that were set to be delivered by three staff members at a workshop on Monday to discuss the 500-page report on current conditions in the bay and future threats that include climate change. 
One of the scientists — Autumn Oczkowski, a research ecologist at the EPA laboratory in Narragansett — was set to deliver the keynote address at the workshop at Save The Bay’s headquarters in Providence. She will be replaced by Robinson W. Fulweiler, an ecosystems ecologist at Boston University, whose research has included a study on rising water temperatures in Narragansett Bay. 
“Narragansett Bay is one of Rhode Island’s most important economic assets and the EPA won’t let its scientists talk with local leaders to plan for its future. 
Whatever you think about climate change, this kind of collaboration should be a no-brainer,” Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., told The Washington Post Sunday night. “Muzzling our leading scientists benefits no one.”

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/zz/news/20171023/epa-cancels-talks-by-3-agency-scientists-at-rhode-island-event

The Blackstone River runs from Worcester to Narragansett Bay and  close by the Slater Mill in Pawtucket, RI where I grew up
The Blackstone River runs from Worcester to Narragansett Bay and
close by the Slater Mill in Pawtucket, RI where I grew up

"Within the next three decades, floods that used to strike the New York City area only once every 500 years could occur every five years, according to a new scientific study released just days before the fifth anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. 
The study, performed by researchers at several universities and published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, primarily blames the predicted change on sea-level rise caused by global warming. 
“This is kind of a warning,” said Andra Garner, a Rutgers University scientist and study co-author. “How are we going to protect our coastal infrastructure?” 
The researchers based their analysis on multiple models that factored in predictions for sea level rise and possible changes in the path of future hurricanes."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/zz/news/20171023/study-nyc-could-see-bad-flooding-every-5-years

Saturday, July 29, 2017

"the problem-solving that goes along with a mission to Mars"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"When Sunita Williams was growing up in Needham, NASA’s space shuttle program, construction of an orbital lab and trips to the moon figured large in the future astronaut’s imagination. 
It’s different for young people now, she says. For them, the shuttle program is old school, the International Space Station (ISS) is an orbital fixture zooming around the earth 16 times a day, and dreams of moon trips have been replaced by imagining trips to — and even colonization of — a more distant frontier: Mars. 
This idea of an attainable Mars is at the center of the Netflix documentary “The Mars Generation,” which is among the films scheduled for screening at the 26th Annual Woods Hole Film Festival starting this weekend."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170728/astronaut-franklin-teen-to-appear-at-woods-hole-film-festival

Article posted earlier:
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2017/07/yeah-its-habitat-but-its-really-just.html


Home page for The Mars Generation
Home page for The Mars Generation

The IMDB page for The Mars Generation   http://www.imdb.com/title/tt6333096/

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

"Yeah, it’s a habitat. But it’s really just a box." (video)

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Josh Rich is a self-described “space nerd”– has been since before he could read – and his passion could one day be something for which astronauts heading to Mars will be grateful. 
That’s because the recent Franklin High School graduate has his sights set on helping get people comfortably to and settled on the red planet, Earth’s closest neighbor. 
Already, Rich is among a group of space visionaries NASA is calling “The Mars Generation,” and he is prominently featured in the recently released Netflix film of the same name. 
“It was filmed two summers ago, when I last went to Space Camp,” said Rich, adding that most films normally take about 18 months to two years to complete."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170710/franklin-student-featured-on-netflix-film





Home page for The Mars Generation
Home page for The Mars Generation

The IMDB page for The Mars Generation   http://www.imdb.com/title/tt6333096/


Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Digital Learning Committee and Science/STEM Presentations

The documents scheduled for presentation and discussion at the Franklin, MA School Committee meeting on Tuesday, May 9, 2017.









Friday, April 7, 2017

Tri-County RVTHS Students Win Massachusetts NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing

Three Tri-County RVTHS Seniors, Adriana Oliveira of Seekonk; Cara Wolfe of Attleboro; and Ashley O'Handley of Plainville, have received the Massachusetts NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing. The award, sponsored by the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT), Bank of America, BATEC, Microsoft, Science Club for Girls, UMass School of Computer Science and Wellesley College, recognizes young high school women for their computing-related achievements and interests as part of an effort to encourage more young women to choose careers in technology. All three Tri-County students plan to continue their education pursuing various degrees in Computer Science.

A total of 32 award-winners were selected from high schools across Massachusetts for their outstanding aptitude and interest in information technology and computing, solid leadership ability, good academic history, and plans for post-secondary education. Each award-winner received two engraved awards, one for the student and one for her school’s trophy case.

“Encouraging young women’s interest in technology careers is critical: our workforce needs their creativity and their innovation,” said Lucy Sanders, CEO and Co-founder of NCWIT.
Tri-County RVTHS Students Win Massachusetts NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing
Tri-County RVTHS Students Win Massachusetts
NCWIT Award for Aspirations in Computing

“Tri-County is proud that three of our students who received this prestigious award,” said Superintendent Stephen Dockray. “Tri-County continues to offer Computer Information Systems as a part of its curriculum, recognizing its value to students’ future success.”

The National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT) works to correct the imbalance of gender diversity in technology and computing because gender diversity positively correlates with a larger workforce, better innovation, and increased business performance. Increasing the number of women in technology and computing also has the potential to improve the design of products and services to better serve a more diverse population, and increase economic and social well-being by providing more women with stable and lucrative careers. Find out more at www.ncwit.org.


Tri-County RVTHS, located at 147 Pond Street in Franklin, is a recipient of the High Schools That Work Gold Achievement Award and serves the communities of Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Norfolk, North Attleborough, Plainville, Seekonk, Sherborn, Walpole, and Wrentham.

Friday, March 17, 2017

In the News: Family science night; police await lab results

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"High school students and teachers worked to kindle scientific curiosity in young minds during Thursday's "Family Science Night" at the school. 
Visitors watched a liquid nitrogen demonstration, controlled robots, took part in forensics demonstrations and learned how a lemon could be a battery - among other things - through the course of the night. 
Science teacher Ann Ritchie said the event, put on by the school's Science National Honor Society, works to give younger children a firsthand look at the scientific concepts that underpin the world as we know it, and hopefully encourages them to explore further. 
"It's really all about the power of experience," she said. "We can talk all day in front of the class about theory and concepts, but to put it in front of the children encourages them to make connections."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170316/franklin-science-night-features-bottles-lemons


"A day after emergency personnel responded to a Stewart Street residence for a chemical incident, police are awaiting the analysis of items removed from the house. 
Deputy Police Chief James Mill said Thursday afternoon that experts were in the process of determining what substances were recovered from the 84 Stewart St. residence. 
Mill said there had not been an arrest related to the matter at this point. He emphasized that the scene is safe at this point. 
According to a Franklin Police Department release, the town fire department responded to a medical emergency at the house at about 8 a.m. Wednesday and personnel noted several chemical items that raised concerns."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170316/police-investigating-chemicals-removed-from-franklin-house


Friday, March 10, 2017

Kids' Corner: Art, Science, Yoga & Cooking Fun



School Bus
Franklin Public Schools                Lifelong Learning Institute
The Center for Adult Education and Community Learning
Art, Science, Yoga, and Cooking Fun
All At Kids' Corner
 
   Kids' Corner Franklin…..
      Where fun and learning meet

   Kids' Corner Franklin, a program of Franklin Public Schools Lifelong Learning Institute and The Center for Adult Education & Community Learning, is a unique collection of after school activities for children with the goal of making learning fun.

   Classes are small, relaxed and designed to encourage children's creativity……a place where fun and learning meet.

   Click on the yellow button below and explore the opportunities we have created just for kids.
                Download Flyer

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FPS- Lifelong Learning | 355 East Central Street, Franklin, MA 02038
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