Showing posts with label grants. Show all posts
Showing posts with label grants. Show all posts

Monday, June 10, 2024

"There’s a secret for Mass. cities and towns to win big bucks from Washington: Invest in sustainability"

Via the Boston Globe

"In three years, when the Bennett-Hemenway Elementary School in Natick is outfitted with air conditioning and staff and students will no longer wilt on the hottest days, it will be thanks to two things: a $2 million grant from the US Department of Energy, and Jillian Wilson Martin.

Wilson Martin is the sustainability director for Natick, one of dozens employed by cities and towns across the state. They don’t always do the most exciting work. Increasingly, the job description includes hours of writing grant applications, trying to get a piece of the billions of federal dollars for climate and infrastructure projects pushed by the Biden administration.

But the payoff can be huge.

“You guys. I literally almost passed out when I found out,” Wilson Martin wrote last summer in a joy-filled newsletter announcing the Energy Department grant, as well as a separate $250,000 grant from the state aimed at helping communities adapt to climate impacts. “Those hand cramps paid off!”
Continue reading the Boston Globe article ->  https://www.bostonglobe.com/2024/06/08/science/sustainability-officers-help-deliver-federal-funding/

"There’s a secret for Mass. cities and towns to win big bucks from Washington: Invest in sustainability"
"There’s a secret for Mass. cities and towns to win big bucks from Washington: Invest in sustainability"

Sunday, March 17, 2024

Mass Cultural Council offers Operating Grants (yes, really!)

via Mass Cultural Council 

"Apply Now: Operating Grants for Organizations!

We are proud to announce our Operating Grants for Organizations, which offer multi-year, unrestricted operating funds to nonprofit cultural organizations and cultural affiliates that enrich cultural life across the Commonwealth. 
- Grant amounts start at $6,000 in FY25.
- Deadline: June 13, 2024.

Register for an information session on March 20, 2024 and/or office hours (through early June) to learn more."

Link for additional info -> https://massculturalcouncil.org/blog/new-operating-grants-for-organizations-available/ 

Program guidelines -> https://massculturalcouncil.org/organizations/operating-grants-for-organizations/application-process/

@masscultural

Mass Cultural Council offers Operating Grants (yes, really!)
Mass Cultural Council offers Operating Grants (yes, really!) 

Thursday, February 8, 2024

Franklin's Three Middle Schools Receive Grant to Support STEM Career Learning

 

Superintendent Lucas Giguere is pleased to announce that the Remington Middle School, Horace Mann Middle School and Annie Sullivan Middle School recently received grant funds from the One8 Foundation to offer an expanded curricular program from Project Lead the Way (PLTW) to support STEM career learning.

The One8 Foundation collaborates with partners to identify, support and scale high impact programs, like PLTW, to help schools and teachers prepare students for success.

PLTW is a nonprofit organization that provides a transformative learning experience for PreK-12 students and teachers through coursework in computer science, engineering, and biomedical science. Franklin's three middle schools join more than 12,000 schools across the country offering PLTW programs to millions of students.

“Receiving these grants gives us the opportunity to realize what we imagine for our students," said Director of Curriculum STEM Eric Stark. "By expanding our partnership with the One8 Foundation, our computer science and STEM teachers will join a nationwide community of educators, and our students will gain access to an engaging and rigorous curriculum and high-quality instructional materials."

The grant funds will be used to implement three PLTW Gateway units for the first time in Franklin Public Schools. In the first unit offered, Design and Modeling, students will discover the design process and develop an understanding of the influence of creativity and innovation in their lives. They will be challenged to use and apply what they have learned throughout the unit to design a therapeutic toy for a child who has cerebral palsy.

"We are so excited to be a part of this partnership with Project Lead the Way for the first time,” Superintendent Giguere said. "We are looking forward to seeing our students participate in these programs and how they can apply their skills across the computer sciences, shaping them for real-world experiences."
The second unit that will be offered is Computer Science for Innovators and Makers. Students will discover computer science concepts and skills by creating personally relevant, tangible and shareable projects. Throughout the unit, students will learn about programming for the physical world by blending hardware design and software development. They will design and develop a physical computing device, interactive art installation or wearable, and plan and develop code for microcontrollers that bring their physical designs to life.

The third unit that will be offered is called App Creators. This unit will expose students to computer science by computationally analyzing and developing solutions to authentic problems through mobile app development, and will convey the positive impact of the application of computer science to other disciplines and to society. Students will customize their experience by choosing a problem that interests them in the areas of health, environment, emergency preparedness, education, community service and school culture.

Funds from the grant will also support teacher professional development and the purchase of materials and equipment that will be used in PLTW courses. In addition, as a school with PLTW programming in Massachusetts, each school will have access to a regular set of teacher professional learning opportunities, student project showcases, and connections to industry professionals offered by the Mass Learning Project and the One8 Applied Learning Hub.

“Students are hungry for experiences that allow them to apply what they are learning to solve real-world, meaningful problems," said One8 Foundation President Joanna Jacobson. "Providing equitable access to hands-on applied learning programs that deliver academic gains while building critical thinking and complex problem-solving skills ensures students are engaged and interested in school and prepared for success in this ever-changing world."


About Project Lead The Way
Project Lead The Way (PLTW) is a mission-driven organization that is transforming the learning experience for millions of PreK-12 students and thousands of teachers across the country. PLTW empowers students to develop in-demand, transportable knowledge and skills through pathways in computer science, engineering, and biomedical science. PLTW's teacher training and resources support teachers as they engage their students in real-world learning.


Friday, February 2, 2024

Franklin Food Pantry recognized for promoting energy efficiency and renewable energy across Massachusetts

                   Recognition provides $50,000 in unrestricted funding and volunteer support from Citizens

 

The Franklin Food Pantry, a nonprofit whose mission is to alleviate food insecurity and compassionately empower their community through resources and collaboration, has been named a Citizens' 2024 Champion in Action® for their efforts advancing renewable energy.

Announced jointly by Citizens and NECN, the Franklin Food Pantry will receive $50,000 in unrestricted funding and promotional and volunteer support to propel their work to build a more inclusive and sustainable future for Massachusetts.

"The Franklin Food Pantry is extremely honored to receive the highly competitive Champions in Action Award, which will help fund solar panel installation and allow clients to access supplemental food assistance and programs in an energy-efficient, sustainable building," said Tina Powderly, Executive Director, Franklin Food Pantry.  "Investing in green energy is a priority for our organization and energy generated by solar panels will strengthen The Pantry's financial profile by offsetting future operating costs."

The Franklin Food Pantry offers supplemental food assistance, household necessities, and resource referral programs to more than 1,300 individuals per year. The organization recently moved to a larger facility with a loading dock and warehouse which allows them to easily distribute and ensure equitable access to food and other goods. The Pantry will use the Champion in Action grant to purchase solar panels for the new facility to help reduce operating costs and improve its environmental footprint.

As a Champion in Action, Franklin Food Pantry will benefit from:

  • A $50,000 contribution in unrestricted funds from Citizens
  • Media coverage and public service announcements from NECN
  • Complimentary membership to the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network
  • Volunteer support from Citizens colleagues
  • Public relations and promotional support

"Citizens is committed to driving positive climate impact by reducing our operational emissions, supporting our clients' sustainability journeys, and partnering with community organizations to drive change," said Lisa Murray, President of Citizens Massachusetts. "As one of our 2024 Champions in Action grantees, we are honored to support Franklin Food Pantry's work to create sustainable energy solutions within their organization and across Massachusetts."

 "The Boston stations of NBC and Telemundo are proud to support the work of Champions in Action, which directly elevates the impact of nonprofits throughout the Commonwealth," said Maggie Baxter, VP of Programming and Community for NBC10 Boston, NECN, and Telemundo Nueva Inglaterra.

Citizens' Champions in Action program celebrates and supports local nonprofits with operating budgets under $5 million who are creating lasting change in the communities they serve. Twice a year, a nonprofit in one of seven Citizens' markets is selected to receive funding, promotional and volunteer support to advance programming and services focused on a relevant topic that changes bi-annually.

Since the program's launch 21 years ago, Citizens has awarded more than $10 million in unrestricted grants and promotional and volunteer support to more than 375 Champion in Action nonprofit winners across the bank's footprint. In Massachusetts alone, 62 nonprofits have been honored, receiving more than $1.7 million in funding.

For more information about the Champions in Action program, visit Champions in Action | Be Inspired | Citizens (citizensbank.com). To learn more about Citizens' work driving positive climate impact, visit Driving Positive Climate Impact | Sustainable Banking (citizensbank.com).  

 

About Citizens Financial Group, Inc.  

Citizens Financial Group, Inc. is one of the nation's oldest and largest financial institutions, with $222.0 billion in assets as of December 31, 2023. Headquartered in Providence, Rhode Island, Citizens offers a broad range of retail and commercial banking products and services to individuals, small businesses, middle-market companies, large corporations and institutions. Citizens helps its customers reach their potential by listening to them and by understanding their needs in order to offer tailored advice, ideas and solutions. In Consumer Banking, Citizens provides an integrated experience that includes mobile and online banking, a full-service customer contact center and the convenience of approximately 3,200 ATMs and approximately 1,100 branches in 14 states and the District of Columbia. Consumer Banking products and services include a full range of banking, lending, savings, wealth management and small business offerings. In Commercial Banking, Citizens offers a broad complement of financial products and solutions, including lending and leasing, deposit and treasury management services, foreign exchange, interest rate and commodity risk management solutions, as well as loan syndication, corporate finance, merger and acquisition, and debt and equity capital markets capabilities. More information is available at www.citizensbank.com or visit us on X (formerly Twitter), LinkedIn or Facebook. 


About NBC10 Boston  

Owned by NBCUniversal, NBC10 Boston delivers viewers in the Greater Boston area, Southern New Hampshire and Northeastern Massachusetts NBC's award-winning daytime, primetime and late-night signature programs and local breaking news and information. The station features the most accurate weather in the region with "First Alert Weather" and an exclusive 10-day forecast. Additionally, NBC10 Boston features the market's only daily live lifestyle program, "The Hub Today." The station's investigative units, "NBC10 Boston Responds" and "The Investigators" answer local consumer inquiries and shines a light on questionable practices. NBC10Boston's news coverage and content is also delivered to viewers on-the-go through its dedicated website NBC10Boston.com, a customized mobile app and via Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat. The station has been awarded eleven Edward R. Murrow awards since its launch, including for "Overall Excellence" and "Diversity, Equity and Inclusion." 

 

About the Franklin Food Pantry, Inc.
The Franklin Food Pantry, Inc. offers supplemental food assistance, household necessities, and resource referral programs to more than 1,300 individuals per year. The Pantry relies on donations and grants to purchase items and pay for daily operations, and partnerships with The Greater Boston Food Bank, Lovin' Spoonfuls, and local grocery stores to achieve greater buying power and lower costs. Programs include In-person Shopping, Curbside Pick-up, Emergency Food Bags, Mobile Pantries, Home Delivery, Kids' Snack Bags, Weekend Backpacks, Holiday Meal Kits, Community Gardens, and the Franklin Farmers Market. The Pantry is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization in good standing in Massachusetts, recognized by Charity Navigator as a Four- Star Charity, and awarded GuideStar's Platinum Transparency ranking. The Pantry is located at 341 W. Central St. in Franklin, MA on Route 140. Please visit www.franklinfoodpantry.org for more information.

 

About NECN  

Owned by NBCUniversal, NECN serves as the largest 24-hour regional news network in the U.S.  Since its launch in 1992, NECN has grown to include 3.6 million subscribers in more than 1,050 cities and towns throughout all six New England states. NECN has established itself as an industry leader as the only cable television news station to earn a George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I Dupont- Columbia University Broadcast Journalism Award, among many other accolades. On January 19, 2020, NECN relaunched its entire network targeting a new audience – millennial Women 25-54. As a digital-first network, NECN has changed the way it delivers news, entertainment, and lifestyle content across all platforms.

 

About Telemundo Boston 

Owned by NBCUniversal, Telemundo Boston, WNEU, is a local Telemundo owned station that serves viewers in the Greater Boston area. Telemundo Boston produces 10 hours of local news programming each week. The station's newscast, "Noticiero Telemundo Nueva Inglaterra" (Telemundo New England News) is the #1 Spanish- language newscast in New England airing every weeknight at 5:00 PM, 5:30 PM, 6:00 PM and 11:00 PM and delivers live, local breaking news, weather forecasts and special reports, as well as sports and entertainment information to Spanish-speaking audiences in Boston and in Hartford, Connecticut through a simulcast via WRDM. Audiences can also receive the most-up-to-date news and information across the station's digital and mobile platforms at TelemundoNuevaInglaterra.com, via the "Telemundo Nueva Inglaterra" mobile app, and its social media channels @TelemundoNI. 

 

About NBC Sports Boston 

NBC Sports Boston reaches more than 4 million households in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Programming includes the Boston Celtics, Arbella Early Edition, Boston Sports Tonight, Celtics Post Up, Monday Night Patriots, Quick Slants, Football Day in New England including pre and post-game programs surrounding all Patriots games, CAA football, basketball and more. NBCSportsBoston.com and all of the network's social media channels (@NBCSBoston) provide continuous news, video and in-depth, up-to-the-minute coverage of New England sports. Visit NBCSportsBoston.com for more information. Check local listings for the specific channel location for your area. 


Tuesday, January 9, 2024

EPA Funds Clean School Bus Program - Announces $1B in Grants

"The US has announced nearly $1bn in grants to replace diesel-powered school buses with electric and lower-emitting vehicles.

The Environmental Protection Agency will disburse funds to 280 school districts serving 7 million children across the country in an effort to curb harmful air pollution and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

“Today we’re once again accelerating the transition to electric and low-emission school buses in America, helping to secure a healthier future where all our children can breathe cleaner air,” the EPA administrator, Michael Regan, said in a statement.

Diesel emissions have been linked to higher rates of asthma, cancer and school absenteeism. Communities of color and people living in low-income neighborhoods are more likely to suffer from higher rates of air pollution."
Continue reading on The Guardian web page (subscription may be required)


The details on the 67 grant recipients, 3 of which seem to be MA based. Lawrence, Fall River and a bus service for part of New Bedford. ->   https://www.epa.gov/cleanschoolbus/clean-school-bus-program-awards

EPA Funds Clean School Bus Program - Announces $1B in Grants
EPA Funds Clean School Bus Program - Announces $1B in Grants

Saturday, January 6, 2024

Franklin Cultural District Grant Awards Announced

Hello Everyone, please see the great news about the latest Franklin Cultural District's funding allocations! 

The Franklin Cultural District Committee (FCDC) was honored to receive a $15,000.00 Cultural District Investment grant from the Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) for the 2024 fiscal year. The FCDC decided to utilize some of the MCC grant funds to continue its Artsy Box Project. Additionally, the FCDC issued a request that Franklin Cultural District (FCD) Partners and others submit funding proposals for projects that support the goals of the Franklin Cultural District. 

Fourteen (14) funding requests totaling over $21,500.00 were received. At the December 14, 2023 FCDC meeting all funding requests were carefully evaluated, and the Committee voted to award at least some funding in support of all 14 projects.

The FCDC is pleased to announce the following funding awards:
  • Children’s Museum of Franklin, funding towards the cost of Makerspace Materials
  • Franklin Art Association, funding to cover a portion of the cost of printing a FAA banner
  • Franklin Farmers Market, funding for entertainment during Farmers Markets in June 2024
  • Franklin Food Pantry, funding for the cost of materials/services for a public art project
  • Franklin Lifelong Learning, partial funding for a presentation to parents, and the general public, by Dr. David Murphy “Executive Functions Relevance for Creativity”; Strategies to develop and improve Executive Functions in the home"
  • Franklin Performing Arts Company, partial funding towards the cost of "August: Osage County" 
  • Franklin Porchfest Committee, partial funding of costs associated with initiating and promoting Franklin's inaugural Porchfest event
  • Franklin Public Library, funding towards the cost of the “Irish in America” performance
  • Franklin Public Library, Franklin Historical Museum, and Escape Into Fiction, funding to cover a portion of the cost of planning and implementing Franklin Book Week, “A Community Rediscovery of Ideas, Literature, and the Shared Gift of Language"
  • Jon Mitchell, partial funding towards the cost of his Chamber Opera, Mary Anning: Fossil Hunter.
  • Mary MacMurray, FPS Music Teacher, funding for the “Night of the Arts” 
  • Mary Olsson, partial funding towards the cost of scanning and digitizing 600+/- Historic Glass Plate Negatives, and for a glossy print copy of each image
  • Oak Street Elementary School, partial funding towards the cost of the Cultural Fair this spring on the Oak/HMMS Campus
  • Temple Etz Chaim, partial funding towards the cost of the Israel Dance and Music Program.
Franklin Cultural District
Franklin Cultural District

Note:
The Franklin Cultural District Committee is grateful for the continued support of the Massachusetts Cultural Council and the Town of Franklin. Their contributions are integral to the vitality of the Cultural District and its artists, creatives, businesses, organizations, and institutions.

Massachusetts Cultural Council
Massachusetts Cultural Council







Sunday, December 17, 2023

Finance Committee takes a 'deep dive' (sorta) into the Faculties budget (audio)

FM #1116 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 1116 in the series. 


This session of the radio show shares the Finance Committee meeting held on Wednesday, December 13, 2023. 


They met as scheduled to get an update on the State revenue forecast, take a “deep dive” into the Facilities budget, and get an update on grants for Town and School over the past 10 years.  


6 Finance Committee members participated; 4 in Chambers (Chair Conley, Hamilton, Riley & Nagel), 2 participated remotely (Keophannga & Sansoucy)


Quick recap:

  • State revenue forecast for FY 2024 not meeting expectation, no cuts yet per Governor, does likely mean less revenue for next years budget although local aid is usually one of the last to get affected, something to stay tuned into

  • Budget hearings for May 2024 were confirmed as May 6 for General Government, May 8 for Public safety (Police, Fire, & Dispatch) and DPW (water, sewer, storm water) and Schools on May 15. Proposed meeting calendar to be updated with this decision

  • Deep dive into Facilities

    • Discussion on the list of facilities provided, yes it is facilities not just the buildings

    • Extended discussion on the Upper Union St solar farm which we don't own but for which we own the electrical output and which leads to credits on the Town electrical bill that are used for multiple other electrical improvements, upgrades

    • This turned into a discussion on the heating efficiencies of some buildings; FHS for example was built with better insulation and the walls are R40, vs. the 3 middle school complex buildings are rated R19. This means the heating cots for those buildings are higher due to the less efficient (i.e. insulation factors)

    • While mentioned in passing that the Master Plan Committee has a subcommittee on facilities, and the Schools are working on their long range comprehensive facilities plan, there were no further details added at this time. Members of the School Committee and Central office were present but did not get to provide any additional info

    • The 10 year projection of expenses across the buildings was split evenly between Town and School per Chair Conley. It was not discussed how these expenses would be funded. It was mentioned that the Facilities budget is the first to get hit when a budget shortfall is needed to be adjusted for. Projects get postponed until funding is available (hence the listing of projects that exists, some of which have been awaiting for some time)

  • Discussion on the 10 year report of grants received by the Town and Schools. These made for interesting reading although some of them are not purely "grants" (i.e. the cable access fees are included, they are present due to the accounting for them). One quick take away from the grant report is that the Town has been quite successful over time in obtaining grants and while they will continue to do so, the grant amounts are not sufficient to really make an impact on either the Town or School budget. Averaging approximately 4 million (combined Town & School) on a $150M budget is respectfully valuable but “small change”


The meeting recording runs about an hour & 20 minutes, so let’s listen to the Finance Committee meeting Dec 13, 2023. Audio link -> https://franklin-ma-matters.captivate.fm/episode/fm-1116-franklin-ma-finance-cmte-mtg-12-13-23



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Agenda ->   https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif10036/f/agendas/dec_13_2023_fin_com_agenda.pdf 


Watch the Franklin TV video available for replay https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4WDEAYIeJU 


Public Property & Building, aka “the Facilities Department”

i. FY24 Public Property & Buildings Budget  

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif10036/f/uploads/fy24_public_property_buildings_budget.pdf 

ii. List of Town Owned Buildings  

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif10036/f/uploads/list_of_town_owned_buildings_0.pdf 

iii. December 2020 Kaestle Boos study on school facilities current conditions  

https://www.franklinps.net/sites/g/files/vyhlif4431/f/uploads/franklin_comprehensive_facilities_assessment_-_final_updated_12.1.2020_1.pdf 

iv. Franklin School Department Redistricting Analysis 

https://www.franklinps.net/district/redistricting-analysis 

v. Comprehensive School Facilities Planning Subcommittee  

https://www.franklinps.net/district/school-committee/pages/subcommittees-and-liaisons 

vi. 10-year Capital Facilities Plan    

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif10036/f/uploads/5a._vi_-_facilities_capital_improvement_plan_fy23.12.07.23.xlsx_-_10_year_plan.pdf 

b. Grants discussion

i. Ten-year municipal grants history  

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif10036/f/uploads/5b._i_-_grant_reporting_project_for_fincom_-_town.pdf 

ii. Ten-year school grants history  

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif10036/f/uploads/5b._ii_-_grant_reporting_project_for_fincom_-_school.pdf 


My notes captured via Twitter during the meeting and found in 1 PDF -> https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Vn59WoX94X8yvI0CFWCqw1X6A9m5ePjd/view?usp=drive_link 


Link to Finance Committee => https://www.franklinma.gov/finance-committee 


--------------


We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial.  


This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.

 

How can you help?

  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors

  • If you don't like something here, please let me know


Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.


For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/ or www.franklin.news/


If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com


The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.


I hope you enjoy!

------------------


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Franklin, MA: Finance Committee - Agenda for meeting Dec 13, 2023
Franklin, MA: Finance Committee - Agenda for meeting Dec 13, 2023

Thursday, December 14, 2023

Finance Committee takes a 'deep dive' (sorta) into the Faculties budget (video)

The Finance Committee met as scheduled on Wednesday, Dec 13, 2023. The Franklin TV video is available for replay -> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4WDEAYIeJU

6 members participated, 4 in Chambers (Chair Conley, Hamilton, Riley & Nagel), 2 participated remotely (Keophannga & Sansoucy)

Quick recap:
  • State revenue forecast for FY 2024 not meeting expectation, no cuts yet per Governor, does likely mean less revenue for next years budget although local aid is usually one of the last to get affected, something to stay tuned into
  • Budget hearings for May 2024 were confirmed as May 6 for General Government, May 8 for Public safety (Police, Fire, & Dispatch) and DPW (water, sewer, storm water) and Schools on May 15. Proposed meeting calendar to be updated with this decision
  • Discussion on the list of facilities provided, yes it is facilities not just the buildings
  • Extended discussion on the solar farm which we don't own but for which we own the electrical output and which leads to credits on the Town electrical bill that are used for multiple other electrical improvements, upgrades
  • This turned into a discussion on the heating efficiencies of some buildings; FHS for example was built with better insulation and the walls are R40, vs. the 3 middle school complex buildings are rated R19. This means the heating cots for those buildings are higher due to the less efficient (i.e. insulation factors)
  • While mentioned in passing that the Master Plan Committee has a subcommittee on facilities, and the Schools are working on their long range comprehensive facilities plan, there was not further details added at this time. Members of the School Committee and Central office were present but did not get to provide any additional info
  • The 10 year projection of expenses across the buildings was split evenly between Town and School per Chair Conley. It was not discussed how these expenses would be funded. It was mentioned that the Facilities budget is the first to get hit when a budget shortfall is needed to be adjusted for. Projects get postponed until funding is available (hence the listing of projects that exists, some of which have been awaiting for some time)
  • Discussion on the 10 year report of grants received by the Town and Schools. These made for interesting reading although some of them are not purely "grants" (i.e. the cable access fees are included, they are present due to the accounting for them). One quick takeaway from the grant report is that the Town has been quite successful over time in obtaining grants and while they will continue to do so, the grant amounts are not sufficient to really make on impact on either the Town or School budget. Averaging approximately 4 million (combined Town & School) on a $150M budget is small change

My notes captured via Twitter during the meeting:

Franklin, MA: Finance Committee - Agenda for meeting Dec 13, 2023
Franklin, MA: Finance Committee - Agenda for meeting Dec 13, 2023