Showing posts with label STEM. Show all posts
Showing posts with label STEM. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 25, 2022

Tri-County RVTHS Students Present at NASA in Houston; 2 teams selected as semi-finalists

The Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School District is pleased to announce two of the six teams that participated in this year's NASA HUNCH Program were selected as semi-finalists. The NASA HUNCH Program allows vocational students to help develop important features and hardware for the International Space Station (ISS). Each year a set of approximately ten issues that could help astronauts live more functionally or aid in the scientific and engineering capabilities on the ISS are presented in September. Students select an issue, form teams, and work together on a solution. All juniors in the Engineering Program participate. (www.hunchdesign.com)

The students in the NASA HUNCH Program work with mentors, college professors, national companies, engineers from NASA, and other organizations to help hone their ideas. In addition, each student is encouraged to include their work with NASA on their resume. The students' fresh perspective, time, and energy assists the Research and Integration Office out of the Johnson Space Center. This year each student who presented in Houston received a personalized recommendation letter to assist their future endeavors.

Students worked to provide a preliminary design review in February. After this review, teams refine their ideas and have a critical design review which typically takes place in New Jersey. The finalists are invited to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, to present to NASA and anyone interested. This year sixty teams from around the country were invited to Houston to present.

Thomas Ford (Millis), Timothy Harrington (North Attleboro), Joshua Shockley (Wrentham), and Cory George (Seekonk) were finalists with the mockup of a Destiny module built for transport they created. The Destiny module is the primary research laboratory on the ISS. Destiny's research allows scientists to understand our world better and prepare for future space missions. The students were tasked with researching materials within budgeting constraints and creating a mockup to show how the traveling module would assemble and disassemble for easy transport. The team considered structural elements that would be safe for the public to view, interact with, and fit on a flatbed truck.

Nicholas Aguiar (Seekonk), Zachary Blenkhorn (Medway), Joseph Cady (Plainville), and Aidan Juhl (Millis) worked together to create Magnetic Boots for Space X Human Landing System. These boots would allow the astronauts to walk on the outside of the ship instead of floating, which would enable them to maneuver themselves with their feet and carry items with their hands, similar to how they would work on Earth. "We learned you won't get anything done on the first try- it won't be perfect," commented Nicholas Aguiar of Seekonk when asked about the design process.

The teams traveled to Houston to present their projects to NASA in April. The students agreed that having the opportunity to pitch their idea to NASA and "pick the brains of such a knowledgeable group" were highlights of their trip. The students will now wait to hear from NASA to see if their idea will move forward in the design process.

 

L-R: Kristen Magas (teacher-North Attlebor), Timothy Harrington (North Attleboro), Joshua Shockley (Wrentham), Thomas Ford (Millis), Aidan Juhl (Millis),  Joseph Cady (Plainville), Zachary Blenkhorn (Medway), Nicholas Aguiar (Seekonk), Jeffrey McCall (Teacher-Rehoboth)
L-R: Kristen Magas (teacher-North Attleboro), Timothy Harrington (North Attleboro), Joshua Shockley (Wrentham), Thomas Ford (Millis), Aidan Juhl (Millis),  Joseph Cady (Plainville), Zachary Blenkhorn (Medway), Nicholas Aguiar (Seekonk), Jeffrey McCall (Teacher-Rehoboth)

Thursday, November 7, 2019

“We live in the hub of the robotics universe”

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"The site of a long-vacant drug manufacturing plant on Otis Street is getting a new life.

Amazon.com Inc. announced plans on Wednesday to construct a $40 million Amazon Robotics Innovation Hub at the former AstraZeneca site at 50 Otis St. and bring 200 new jobs to town. The 35,000-square-foot facility will be in addition to the Amazon Robotics facility in North Reading that will together serve as the e-commerce giant’s epicenter of robotics innovation.

“We are going to completely re-do that site,” said Tye Brady, Amazon Robotics chief technologist, in a phone interview with the Daily News. “I can guarantee it’s going to be a world-class, state-of-the-art facility.”

The innovation hub will feature corporate offices, research and development labs and manufacturing space. The new location will allow Amazon Robotics to grow its engineering, manufacturing, support and test teams in the state. Crews will design, build, program and ship robots all under the same roof that will improve delivery speeds for customers around the world, said Brady."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20191106/amazon-to-build-robotics-innovation-hub-at-former-astrazeneca-site-in-westborough

This is good news. There are robotics groups in local schools. There is also the robotics group that has moved into the Red Brick School to utilize that facility for their robotics activities.

For more info about 4H Alarm Robotics 2079 visit their page   https://www.alarmrobotics.com/

The Alarm 2079 robotics team is a competitive high school robotics team
"The Alarm 2079 robotics team is a competitive high school robotics team"

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Tri-County Regional's Summer STEAM Camp Now Accepting Registrations

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School's summer camp program, "Tri-County Summer STEAM Camp" is now accepting registrations.

Tri-County's licensed teachers use their industry expertise to teach campers about everything from Engineering Technology to Cosmetology. During the week-long camps, students will learn how to program a video game, build like an engineer, or cook like a chef. These creative activities allow campers to refine valuable STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) skills during the summer months.

Tri-County Steam Camp
Tri-County Steam Camp
"Experiencing life at camp has profound positive effects on children and is the perfect time to enjoy activities of interest while continuing to learn," said Jean George, Director of Vocational Education at Tri-County. "Tri-County Summer STEAM Camp offers campers opportunities to have fun and become familiar with various career pathways in innovative and engaging ways."

Tri-County camps include: Art Adventures Camp, Cosmetology Camp, Cyber Camp, "Hey Mom and Dad, Let Me Cook Dinner!" Camp, Kerbal Space Program Camp, and Robots, Robots, Everywhere Camp. Full camp descriptions are available on the high school's website. Camps will be offered in five, one-week sessions beginning on July 9th and ending on August 3rd. The cost of each camp is $210.
Enrollment in each program is limited to students entering grades 6, 7, and 8 in September 2018. Students living in the Tri-County District are given preference for enrollment. Early registration is highly recommended as the camps are expected to fill up. All programs are subject to adequate enrollment.

A completed registration form and payment in full must be received in order to be registered. To learn more or to register, visit www.tri-county.us/summercamps.

Tri-County RVTHS, located at 147 Pond Street in Franklin, is a recipient of the High Schools That Work Gold Achievement Award and serves the communities of Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Norfolk, North Attleboro, Plainville, Seekonk, Sherborn, Walpole, and Wrentham.

Sunday, April 15, 2018

School Committee Recap - April 10, 2018

This is the summary of the School Committee meeting held on Tuesday, April 10, 2018.

Acknowledgement of the tragic passing of FHS senior Jack Sewell and support for students available.

Work on the high school field concession stand will begin soon and appropriate preparation are being taken to minimize disruption. Superintendent Ahern distributed a letter to the community later in the week and that letter was shared here.
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2018/04/franklin-public-schools-concession.html  

Superintendent Ahern's report to the community can be found online
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1fk6ZJwGggl1juIOdMYAxI4a_OdBXWbYM/view?usp=sharing

In the Discussion - Action section of the meeting, the School Committee formally approved the budget for Fiscal Year 2019. The budget is scheduled for review by the Finance Committee (6:00 PM - Apr 24) before going to the Town Council for their cursory hearings and vote.

Dr Joyce Edwards presented an update on STEM and digital learning. The presentation copy is shared here. Photos of the presentation pages can be found on the live reported notes below.




An update on School Safety was presented. Franklin Police Sgt. Mark Manocchio joined Peter light and Sara Ahern for this presentation and discussion. The presentation and discussion focus on the overall process. It was (as most security discussions are right to be) light on details. The coordination and collaboration of the many parties is good. They also conduct a review and make adjustments after each incident. This is as much as can reasonably be expected for a public forum. Revealing more than this is not a good practice.

(Note: the safety presentation has not yet been made available on the Schools webpage. I did capture photos of each page and they can be viewed in the School safety link below)

My notes reported live during the meeting can be found here:


Dr Joyce Edwards presented an update on STEM and digital learning
Dr Joyce Edwards presented an update on STEM and digital learning

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

In the News: STEM learning at the YMCA; snow/ice budget status; candidates for new DESE commissioner

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"STEM learning doesn’t usually come to mind when thinking about the YMCA, but in Franklin, they’re changing the rules. 
The Bernon Family Branch of the Hockomock Area YMCA is taking a stab at STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) with a new technology lab, club and after-school program. 
“We saw an opportunity to take a lead,” said Executive Director Scott Martin. “We found a way to offer this to kids who did not have access to it before.” 
With programming to 3D print design, the YMCA’s tech lab is a vibrant place to keep the mind engaged, but still have fun."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20180116/franklin-ymca-branch-debuts-stem-program


"With two months remaining in the winter season, snow and ice budgets from nearby municipalities are being chipped away because of the persistent cold. 
Though all towns have access to emergency funds in the events of the budget runs dry, the monetary concern is still there. 
Franklin
Total: $950,000
Spent: $500,000
Remaining: About $400,000
 
“It’s New England, we’ve come to expect this,” said Deputy Town Administrator Jaime Hellen. “Our team is prepared and we’re ready to tackle any challenge. We’ll just have to wait and see what happens.”

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20180116/snow-ice-budgets-melting-away


"The superintendent and receiver of the Lawrence school system and educators from New York and Texas are the finalists to become the next education commissioner in Massachusetts, the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education announced Monday. 
Lawrence receiver Jeff Riley, Penny Schwinn, chief deputy commissioner of academics for the Texas Education Agency, and AngĂ©lica Infante-Green, deputy commissioner of the Office of Instructional Support P-12 in New York State Education Department, will be interviewed next week by the Board of Elementary and Secondary Education. 
The board hopes to recommend a candidate to Education Secretary James Peyser later this month.

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20180116/state-three-finalists-for-education-commissioner

Friday, September 29, 2017

Information meeting Oct 5 for Destination Imagination

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"An information meeting about Destination Imagination (DI) in Franklin will be held on Oct. 5, 7 p.m., in the pre-school room at the Franklin YMCA, 45 Forge Hill Road, Franklin, to learn more about DI and all that the program has to offer children. 
Franklin Destination Imagination is a 501c3 non-profit organization that operates this after school enrichment program open to all kids from 2nd grade through high school in Franklin. 
Also check out www.destinationimagination.org.

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required) 
http://franklin.wickedlocal.com/news/20170926/time-to-sign-up-for-destination-imagination-in-franklin

Destination Imagination Twitter image
Destination Imagination Twitter image

Saturday, July 29, 2017

"the problem-solving that goes along with a mission to Mars"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"When Sunita Williams was growing up in Needham, NASA’s space shuttle program, construction of an orbital lab and trips to the moon figured large in the future astronaut’s imagination. 
It’s different for young people now, she says. For them, the shuttle program is old school, the International Space Station (ISS) is an orbital fixture zooming around the earth 16 times a day, and dreams of moon trips have been replaced by imagining trips to — and even colonization of — a more distant frontier: Mars. 
This idea of an attainable Mars is at the center of the Netflix documentary “The Mars Generation,” which is among the films scheduled for screening at the 26th Annual Woods Hole Film Festival starting this weekend."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170728/astronaut-franklin-teen-to-appear-at-woods-hole-film-festival

Article posted earlier:
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2017/07/yeah-its-habitat-but-its-really-just.html


Home page for The Mars Generation
Home page for The Mars Generation

The IMDB page for The Mars Generation   http://www.imdb.com/title/tt6333096/

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

"Yeah, it’s a habitat. But it’s really just a box." (video)

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Josh Rich is a self-described “space nerd”– has been since before he could read – and his passion could one day be something for which astronauts heading to Mars will be grateful. 
That’s because the recent Franklin High School graduate has his sights set on helping get people comfortably to and settled on the red planet, Earth’s closest neighbor. 
Already, Rich is among a group of space visionaries NASA is calling “The Mars Generation,” and he is prominently featured in the recently released Netflix film of the same name. 
“It was filmed two summers ago, when I last went to Space Camp,” said Rich, adding that most films normally take about 18 months to two years to complete."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170710/franklin-student-featured-on-netflix-film





Home page for The Mars Generation
Home page for The Mars Generation

The IMDB page for The Mars Generation   http://www.imdb.com/title/tt6333096/


Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Digital Learning Committee and Science/STEM Presentations

The documents scheduled for presentation and discussion at the Franklin, MA School Committee meeting on Tuesday, May 9, 2017.









Sunday, March 19, 2017

Tri-County Regional Opens Summer Camp Registration

Tri-County Regional’s summer camp program, “Tri-County Summer STEAM Camp” is now accepting registrations.

Tri-County’s licensed teachers use their industry expertise to teach campers about everything from Engineering Technology to Cosmetology. During the week-long camps, students will learn how to program a video game, build like an engineer, or cook like a chef. These creative activities allow campers to refine valuable STEAM skills during the summer months.

“Parents and teachers agree, summer is the perfect time to enjoy activities that interest our children and continue authentic learning,” said Jean George, Director of Vocational Education at Tri-County. “Tri-County Summer STEAM Camp offers opportunities to have fun and become familiar with 21st century careers.”
http://www.tri-county.tc/Summer-Camps
http://www.tri-county.tc/Summer-Camps

Several of Tri-County’s most popular camps, including Minecraft Camp and Engineering Camp, will be offered once again this year. We are introducing an Art Adventures Camp that will offer students to learn about graphic design. Full camp descriptions are available on the high school’s website.

Camps will be offered in five, one-week sessions beginning on July 17 and ending on August 18. The cost of each camp will be $210. Enrollment in each program is limited to students entering grades 6, 7, and 8 in September 2017. Students living in the Tri-County District are given preference for enrollment. Early registration is highly recommended as the camps are expected to fill up. All programs are subject to adequate enrollment.

A completed registration form and payment in full must be received in order to be registered. To learn more or to register, visit http://www.tri-county.tc/Summer-Camps.

Tri-County RVTHS, located at 147 Pond Street in Franklin, is a recipient of the High Schools That Work Gold Achievement Award and serves the communities of Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Norfolk, North Attleborough, Plainville, Seekonk, Sherborn, Walpole, and Wrentham.

Friday, February 24, 2017

"There's a real hunger for answers"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"With a goal of encouraging interest in science among young people, Franklin High School's "Family Science Night" will look to build on the success of past events. 
This year's event - on March 16 from 6 to 8 p.m. - will be the third for the school, and will consist of demonstrations and applications of scientific concepts. 
Science teacher Ann Ritchie said there will be some perennial favorites - such adding cornstarch and water to create a substance that seems to be neither solid nor liquid - as well as some new attractions. 
"There will be lots of opportunities to make things," she said. "We're very exited about a station called 'Ask a Scientist.' Thirty-six scientists from the area will be coming throughout the evening, and they'll be taking questions from the public."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170223/franklin-high-school-science-night-coming-in-march




Sunday, October 2, 2016

In the News: early voting begins Oct 24, STEM classes get questions rolling

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"All registered voters will be able to vote before Election Day for the first time ever in Massachusetts. 
Early voting will begin on Oct. 24 and continue through Nov. 4. Prior to the enactment of this new law, the only way a registered voter was allowed to vote prior to Election Day was through absentee voting. Although absentee voting will still be available for registered voters who qualify, only those who will be absent from their city or town on Election Day, or have a disability or religious belief preventing them from going to the polls, will be legally allowed to vote by absentee ballot. 
Unlike absentee voting, early voting is permitted for every registered voter."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20161001/early-voting-to-begin-oct-24



"Questions filled Jim Schliefke’s seventh grade science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) classroom at Horace Mann Middle School in Franklin Wednesday afternoon. 
Students asked Schliefke about a team activity to design a remote-controlled cargo carrier that could carry balls and plastic cubes around the room. 
“Some of them are realizing right now that they can’t do what they thought,” Schliefke noted as he walked around. 
Although it’s not a new addition to Schliefke’s course this year, the project is a prime example of the trial-and-error teaching style more schools around MetroWest and the Milford region are trying to use."


Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20161001/schools-teachers-see-growth-and-changes-in-stem-classes

Horace Mann Middle School shares the building with Oak St Elementary School
Horace Mann Middle School shares the building with Oak St Elementary School

Friday, August 12, 2016

Attention Students: Open Call for Verizon Innovative Learning App Challenge Submissions Now Open to Franklin Residents


Verizon Issues Call to Massachusetts Students for the Best Problem-Solving App Ideas

Fifth Annual Verizon Innovative Learning App Challenge Opens for New Submissions;
Deadline is November 18

Fifth Annual Verizon Innovative Learning App Challenge
Fifth Annual Verizon Innovative Learning App Challenge

WHAT: The Verizon Innovative Learning app challenge – the no-coding-skills-needed contest that gives middle and high school students a chance to bring their problem-solving app ideas to life – is now accepting new app ideas for the 2016-2017 competition.

Winning student teams will be chosen from each state, earning a $5,000 grant for their school or organization and free tablets for each team member. Then the Best In State teams will compete for the ultimate prizes: an additional $15,000 for their organizations, and chance to turn their app ideas into real, working smartphone apps that will be made available for download.

Now in its fifth year, thousands of students across the U.S. have participated in the app challenge - gathering teams, dreaming up ideas, and creating concepts for mobile apps that could solve problems in their schools and communities.

Past winners have been featured at the White House Science Fair and even gone on to sell their completed apps for cash.

Students can submit ideas from Aug. 1 - Nov. 18, 2016, and the winners will be named in January and February 2017.

For more information on how to register for the Verizon Innovative Learning app challenge, or to download the completed apps, visit www.verizon.com/appchallenge. Follow us on Twitter (@VerizonGiving) and Facebook (www.facebook.com/verizonfoundation).

WHY: The app challenge, part of Verizon Innovative Learning, was developed to give all students, regardless of their technology experience or access to technology, a chance to make a difference, and to help spark their interest in STEM subjects and careers.

Over the past 10 years, for example, STEM jobs have grown three times faster than other jobs. STEM jobs are expected to grow by 1 million by 2022 to a total of more than 9 million jobs.

The app challenge provides hands-on, experiential learning that can equip students with the in-demand skills of the future and empower them to envision brighter futures for themselves as business owners, app inventors, coders, technology professionals and more.

The 2016-17 Verizon Innovative Learning app challenge is open for new submission August 1 – November 18, 2016.

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Reminder: Family Science Night at Franklin High School

Family Science Night - Franklin High School 
From 6:00 to 8:00 PM

A community service project by the FHS Science National Honor Society

Tuesday, June 9, 2015

Live reporting: Team Horace Mann Middle School


c. Horace Mann Update – Shawn Fortin, Kaitlyn Demers




(note the slide set needs to be updated as it doesn't include all the photos from the trips)


STEM is not putting students in front of computers
we do love technology, but we do not loose the 'forest for the trees'
challenged the Science Dept to create three small field trips
actually did 5 with a couple of more coming before the year end
several small field trip - single class
secret is to get students excited about science

nurture STEM, provide opportunities that could not be achieved in the classroom

Museum of Science brought a program on heat to the classroom
MIT, actually at Mass General Hospital - beefed up the background on genetics before the trip, looking for signs of life
Mystic Aquarium - biology focused
Harvard Museum of Natural History
Signal Rock Farm - sheep farm, further into genetics

trips were made based upon the interests of the children
kids made the choice

used a simplified application process

the students took turns explaining what they learned from each of the trips
one of the activities was to dissect a squid at Mystic

O'Malley - 
outstanding student presenters, not easy to sit and present to the School Committee
a science trip is important, we live in a culturally diverse area and it is easy to do and well worth it, connecting the schools and community. I also believe in bringing the experts into the school house

Jewell - 
applaud the kids for the presentation, it was great
my father had raised sheep and breed one of his own
DNA is on file for each soldier to help with their identification
it is exciting for you to see that

  • heard about Dr Carr via the network and worked to make the connection
  • Mystic Aquarium is a convenient and good location with manageable traffic
  • Museum of Science, if they could do what they do at the museum, here, it would be worthwhile; did provide some pre-planning to ensure a good fit and interaction
  • a lot of it was trial, if it works, we'll do it again