Showing posts with label PFAS. Show all posts
Showing posts with label PFAS. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 20, 2021

A Message from the Franklin Fire Department - PFAS & Foam

A Message from the Franklin Fire Department - PFAS & Foam

July 19, 2021

To: Franklin Residents
From: Chief McLaughlin, Franklin Fire Department

Re: PFAS and Foam

Recently, the Franklin DPW published the 2020 Drinking Water Report, in which the topic of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) was explained. As stated, one of the possible sources of groundwater contamination may come from the use of “legacy” firefighting foams, which routinely contained 2% - 5% PFAS by volume; specifically, Class B AFFF, which is used to extinguish burning hydrocarbons or flammable liquids.

As your fire department, we just wanted to make you aware that this topic has not been ignored by the Franklin Fire Department, the Massachusetts Department of Fire Services (DFS), or the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP). In 2018, in consultation with the Massachusetts Department of Fire Services, MassDEP chose to implement a foam “take-back” program to assist fire departments in removing these foams from current stockpiles and ensuring they are properly disposed of, rather than used during trainings or firefighting and subsequently released into the environment.

MassDEP’s program targeted foams manufactured before 2003, as manufacturers stopped production of suspect foams in 2002. Recognizing the challenges proper disposal would present to the budgets of most municipalities, MassDEP decided to fund the disposal of these legacy foams through its Massachusetts Chapter 21E / Bureau of Waste Site Cleanup (BWSC) capital funding, consistent with programmatic goals of “pollution prevention” and elimination of “threats of release” of hazardous materials. Under the “take-back program,” MassDEP offered to pay for foam removal and disposal; the local fire departments were responsible for replacing the foam with safer foam alternatives. As part of this take-back program, Franklin Fire was able to dispose of approximately fifty (50) gallons of outdated foam, at no expense to the townspeople.

As the take-back program progressed, many fire departments requested confirmation that current Class B AFFF foam was safe. While these foams often contain some amount of PFAS, it is at lower levels than legacy foam and includes PFAS that are more stable (so-called “short chain”) and expected to have less of an impact on the environment. New “Fluorine Free Foam,” aka “F3” foam, is just now entering the main-stream market. Currently, the majority of Franklin Fire apparatus, that carry foam, carry these newer F3 foams.

Shared from the Town of Franklin  page

The Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) referenced in the letter above

A Message from the Franklin Fire Department - PFAS & Foam
A Message from the Franklin Fire Department - PFAS & Foam


Wednesday, June 9, 2021

Flea-Control Products Found to Be Infested With Forever Chemicals


Popular pet flea collars and treatments contain high levels of toxic PFAS chemicals, ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌  ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌
Flea-Control Products Found to Be Infested With Forever Chemicals

Popular pet flea collars and treatments contain high levels of toxic PFAS chemicals, according to laboratory test results posted today by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility. 
 
PFAS (per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances) are associated with a variety of ailments, including suppressed immune function, thyroid disease, testicular and kidney cancers and liver damage.
 
Popular flea and tick products were sent to a certified lab, which found that:

  • Frontline Plus for Dogs, a popular topical flea and tick product, contains 2,390 parts per trillion (ppt) of four different PFAS, including GenX. Frontline is a liquid pesticide applied between the pets' shoulder blades once a month; it spreads throughout the skin and fur.  
  • Seresto flea and tick collars contain 250 ppt of a long-chain PFAS. Seresto is a plastic band impregnated with insecticides and other ingredients that are released over time and coat an animal's fur. 

 
By comparison, the EPA has yet to promulgate legal limits but has established a 70 ppt lifetime health advisory for two types of PFAS (PFOA and PFOS) in drinking water. Leading scientists have called for a drinking water safety limit of 0.1 ppt for PFOA.
 
After testing by PEER revealed PFAS levels of 250-500 ppt in Anvil 10+10, a widely used, aerially sprayed insecticide, the EPA asked states with existing stocks of Anvil to discontinue its use in order to minimize risks to both the environment and human health.  
 
"EPA's oversight of pest control products is beyond negligent," said PEER science policy director Kyla Bennett, a scientist and attorney formerly with the EPA. "EPA insists that pesticides do not contain PFAS as deliberately added ingredients, yet PFAS are on both EPA's approved list of inert ingredients and are active ingredients in a number of pesticide products. On one hand, EPA declares the urgent need to control the spread of PFAS, while its other hand facilitates the spread of PFAS through lax pesticide regulation."  
 
One major concern is that people can be exposed to these products though their skin by petting and playing with their pets and children face even greater risk through their frequent hand-to-mouth behavior. 
 
A recent study found dogs and cats are highly exposed to PFAS and often exposed to concentrations well above the minimum risk level identified for humans.
 
The troubling findings regarding PFAS in flea-control products comes after documents obtained from the EPA revealed the agency has received more than 75,000 complaints linking the Seresto flea collar to harms ranging from skin irritation to nearly 1,700 pet deaths. Yet the agency has taken no action in response to the reports such as recalling the product or issuing a nationwide warning to the public of its potential dangers. 
 
The Center for Biological Diversity filed a formal legal petition last month urging the EPA to cancel the registration of the Seresto collar, which is also linked to nearly 1,000 incidents of harm to humans.
 
"The trust the public puts in our regulatory agencies is being blatantly violated by the EPA's pesticide office," said Nathan Donley, environmental health science director at the Center for Biological Diversity. "The lack of transparency here is dumbfounding. Not only are we finding out that these products are associated with high levels of harm, but they include dangerous ingredients that are not even being disclosed."
 
Often referred to as "forever chemicals" because they don't break down and can accumulate in humans, PFAS can be found in some food packaging and a wide variety of industrial and household products — including nonstick materials, cleaning products and firefighting foams.

Ph: (202) 265-PEER (7337) · Fax: (202) 265-4192
All content © 2017 Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility
962 Wayne Ave, Suite 610, Silver Spring, MD 20910



Tuesday, May 25, 2021

PFAS: "State environmental officials say they’re constantly reevaluating their standards"

"In Wayland, local officials had been distributing cases of bottled water to 1,400 households a week — nearly a third of the suburb’s residents — and may have to seek a new water source that could cost more than twice the town’s annual budget.

Facing similar contamination in their drinking water, Natick officials plan to spend millions of dollars on a high-tech filtration system. In Wellesley, after shutting down the primary well that provided water to half their residents, officials are contemplating strict water-use limits for the first time.

“We’re definitely concerned,” said David Cohen, Wellesley’s public works director. “We’ll take all the steps we need to to address this.”

Continue reading the article online  (subscription may be required)
https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/05/23/science/more-communities-are-finding-toxic-chemicals-their-drinking-water/

So what are Franklin's test results per the MA Energy & Environmental Affairs Data Portal? 
 
I selected "Franklin Water Department"  and "Town of Franklin" and Contaminant Group of "PFAS" with the reporting period of Jan 1, 2020 through Apr 30, 2021 to get the results in this link


 
It is good to see test results for our water system (no surprise). I won't characterize the specific results as good or bad. I'll let the Town report on the details.
 
what are Franklin's test results
what are Franklin's test results

 
 

Wednesday, November 18, 2020

PFAS from a new angle

From The Guardian, an article of interest for us in Franklin:
"The successful uptake of any vaccine for Covid-19, a crucial step in returning a sense of normalcy after a year ravaged by the coronavirus pandemic, could be hindered by widespread contamination from a range of chemicals used in everyday products.

Small amounts of per- and polyfluoroalkyl (or PFAS) chemicals are commonly found in the bodies of people in the US, as well as several other countries. These man-made chemicals, used in everything from non-stick pans to waterproof clothes to pizza boxes, have been linked to an elevated risk of liver damage, decreased fertility and even cancer.

But scientists warn some of these chemicals can also cause another little-known but potentially significant defect by reducing the effectiveness of certain administered vaccines. This impediment could cast a shadow over efforts to roll out a Covid-19 vaccine to enough people that restrictions on day-to-day life are eased.

“At this stage we don’t know if it will impact a corona vaccination, but it’s a risk,” said Philippe Grandjean, an adjunct professor of environmental health at the Harvard School of Public Health. “We would have to cross our fingers and hope for the best.”

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

Tuesday, October 13, 2020

495/MetroWest Partnership: New PFAS Drinking Water Standard: Presentation and Q&A with MassDEP

The 495/MetroWest Partnership will host representatives from the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for a presentation regarding the Commonwealth's new PFAS drinking water standard, to be followed by a Question & Answer period.

Presenters will include:

  • Kathleen M. Baskin, P.E., Assistant Commissioner, Bureau of Water Resources
  • Damon Guterman, Senior Analyst, Drinking Water Program

This event will take place virtually via Zoom on Wednesday, October 21st, at 8:30 AM.  Click here to register:   https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ViP3UiofT4KWbJONfsmp4w

Background

In January 2019, DEP announced its intention to initiate the process to develop a drinking water standard, known as a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL), for a group of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS). 

On December 27th, 2019, proposed revisions to the drinking water regulations were published in the Massachusetts Register, marking the start of the formal public comment period.  

The revised PFAS regulation was published on October 2nd, 2020:


Click here to access a redlined version, highlighting changes implemented since the draft regulations were released in 2019

For more background information regarding DEP's development of a PFAS drinking water standard, click here  https://www.mass.gov/lists/development-of-a-pfas-drinking-water-standard-mcl

495/MetroWest Partnership: New PFAS Drinking Water Standard: Presentation and Q&A with MassDEP
495/MetroWest Partnership: New PFAS Drinking Water Standard: Presentation and Q&A with MassDEP



In the News: "A Millis drinking water source tested positive for PFAS"

From the Milford Daily News, an article of interest for Franklin: 

"The D’Angelis Water Treatment plant is offline after the town found elevated levels of a group of state-regulated, man-made chemicals in its drinking water.

The chemicals - called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, regularly abbreviated to PFAS - are stain- and water-resistant, and used to coat everything from clothing and furniture to food packaging and non-stick cooking surfaces.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the chemical may cause a wide variety of health problems, from increased risk of kidney or testicular cancer to high blood pressure and pre-eclampsia in pregnant women. Studies are preliminary.

Millis residents should have received a booklet in the mail Friday, explaining when the testing took place and what the town has done. The booklet emphasizes that the town is not in violation of the state’s drinking water regulations."

Sunday, October 11, 2020

"Talk Franklin" discussion on phishing incident, election prep, and PFAS testing

FM #363 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 363 in the series. 

This session of the radio show shares my "Talk Franklin" conversation with Town Administrator Jamie Hellen and Marketing and Communications Specialist Anne Marie Tracey. We had our conversation via conference bridge to adhere to the ‘social distancing’ requirements of this pandemic period.

We talk about: 

Phishing
  • Insurance coverage
  • Internal controls changed
Election prep
  • Ballots mailing
  • Drive thru hours, etc
PFAS testing
  • By April 2021
Meetings
  • Senior Coffee Hour – Oct 15
  • EDC listening session  - Oct 19 #thinkFranklinfirst
  • School Committee – Oct 13

Links to the key topics covered here are included in the show notes. The recording runs about 45 minutes, so let’s listen to my conversation with Jamie and Anne Marie.  Audio file = https://player.captivate.fm/episode/139589c7-00c0-4654-9e10-ae99825a695

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Town Clerk page  https://www.franklinma.gov/town-clerk

Business listening sessions  https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif591/f/uploads/business_listening_flyer_-_final_2_1_1.pdf 

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We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial.  

This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.
 
How can you help?
  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors
  • If you don't like something here, please let me know

Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.

For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/

If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com

The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.

I hope you enjoy!

------------------

You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"

 

"Talk Franklin" discussion on phishing incident, election prep, and PFAS testing
"Talk Franklin" discussion on phishing incident, election prep, and PFAS testing

Friday, October 9, 2020

MA sets PFAS limits for drinking water

Via the Mass Municipal Association (MMA) which reports

"The Baker-Polito administration on Sept. 24 announced final regulations establishing a maximum contaminant level for PFAS compounds detected in drinking water.

The enforceable standards for public drinking water systems impacted by per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) – limited to 20 parts per trillion for the sum of six compounds – are largely aligned with the draft regulations the administration filed last December, on which the MMA commented.

PFAS, known as “forever chemicals,” are a class of manmade chemical compounds considered hazardous to public and environmental health. PFAS have been used since the 1950s in the manufacture of stain-resistant, water-resistant, and non-stick coatings and common consumer products such as food packaging, outdoor clothing, carpets, leather goods, ski and snowboard waxes, and more. The chemicals are also found in firefighting foam and other fire retardants, and have been detected in water and soil sources at or near several military bases and airports in Massachusetts.

The new regulations require public water suppliers to test for the six compounds, called PFAS6, and to take remedial actions when amounts exceed the limit. According to the administration, using the sum of six compounds provides for a higher degree of protection against the harmful effects of the chemicals."

Continue reading the article online  https://www.mma.org/state-establishes-pfas-limits-for-drinking-water-provides-grants/

MMA comments on proposed regulations https://www.mma.org/advocacy/mma-submits-comments-on-draft-pfas-regulations-warning-of-exorbitant-costs/

MA sets PFAS limits for drinking water
MA sets PFAS limits for drinking water



Saturday, January 25, 2020

“Everyone’s really exposed to a toxic soup of these PFAS chemicals”

While the MA DEP is making the rounds seeking public input on proposed regulations, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has come out with a report showing the problem might be more than estimated.
"The contamination of US drinking water with manmade “forever chemicals” is far worse than previously estimated with some of the highest levels found in Miami, Philadelphia and New Orleans, said a report on Wednesday by an environmental watchdog group. 
The chemicals, resistant to breaking down in the environment, are known as perfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. Some have been linked to cancers, liver damage, low birth weight and other health problems. 
The findings here by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) show the group’s previous estimate in 2018, based on unpublished US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data, that 110 million Americans may be contaminated with PFAS, could be far too low."
Continue reading the article online 
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jan/22/us-drinking-water-contamination-forever-chemicals-pfas

The link to the EWG report  https://www.ewg.org/research/national-pfas-testing/

Video link = https://youtu.be/R_D0tbKQGis




Saturday, January 11, 2020

EPA "has a long history of failing to act"

Via the Environmental Working Group:

"This week the House voted overwhelmingly to pass H.R. 535, the PFAS Action Act, which President Trump has threatened to veto.

The bill would set deadlines for the Environmental Protection Agency to reduce ongoing releases of toxic fluorinated chemicals, known as PFAS, and to set a drinking water standard for two notorious PFAS chemicals.

“It’s never been clearer that it’s time for Congress to set tough deadlines to reduce PFAS releases into the air and water, set PFAS drinking water standards, and clean up legacy PFAS pollution,” said EWG Senior Vice President for Government Affairs Scott Faber. “If the Trump administration won’t take the necessary steps to protect the public from PFAS, it’s up to Congress to act."

In other news about the PFAS Action Act, EWG broke down EPA’s history of inaction when it comes regulating PFAS and told the story of a military firefighter pushing for Congress to act on the PFAS crisis."

Continue reading the article online
https://www.ewg.org/news-and-analysis/2020/01/ewg-news-roundup-110-trump-threatens-derail-pfas-action-california-fails

Related links

H.R. 535, the PFAS Action Act
https://www.ewg.org/release/ewg-applauds-historic-bipartisan-pfas-vote

Trump threatens veto
https://www.ewg.org/release/trump-threatens-veto-after-missing-key-pfas-drinking-water-deadline

EPA's history of inaction on PFAS
https://www.ewg.org/news-and-analysis/2020/01/it-s-time-end-epa-s-long-history-failing-act-forever-chemicals

Environmental Working Group
Environmental Working Group

Saturday, January 4, 2020

Franklin Issue on the 2020 'Watch List': new PFAS regulations from MA DEP

As we enter 2020, there are several issue that I will be keeping an eye out for. In no particular priority order, this first one carries over from 2019. The proposed MA DEP regulations are open for review. Public hearings are scheduled throughout the State during January to review the proposed regulations. You can find the schedule at the end of the MMA article linked to and quoted below. Alternatively:
"Public comments on the draft regulations will be accepted by email to program.director-dwp@mass.gov through Feb. 28"

From the Mass Municipal Association (MMA):
"On Dec. 13, the Baker-Polito administration and the Department of Environmental Protection announced their intent to file two regulations related to PFAS, a class of manmade chemical compounds considered hazardous to public and environmental health. 
While many chemicals have been identified as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, the MassDEP regulations pertain to six targeted PFAS compounds. 
The first regulation, filed by MassDEP, mandates cleanup by parties found responsible for groundwater contamination of 20 parts per trillion (ppt) or more of the sum of the six PFAS compounds. The cleanup rule also establishes PFAS limits specifically for soil contamination. Massachusetts is one of only a few states that have established formal PFAS cleanup standards. 
The second regulation is a draft rule that would establish a maximum contaminant level for drinking water at the same 20 ppt of the sum of the six PFAS compounds. In a press release, the MassDEP notes that the proposed maximum contaminant level for drinking water “covers a larger subgroup of compounds than any other state and provides a greater deal of protection, particularly for sensitive subgroups.”
Continue reading the article online
https://www.mma.org/state-files-regulations-regarding-pfas-contamination/

Why?

As an update to the previously shared listing on the "turf issue":

What we know:

What we don’t know:

  • What happened to the Conservation Commission mitigation measures from when the field was first installed (in 2004?)?
  • Where was the old carpet and bags of unused infill taken?
  • What will the Federal agencies do with PFAS and the recent revelations (if anything)?

Related Links

TA Statement 12/4/19 meeting

TA Statement 10/16/19 meeting

Pantherbook article 12/11/19

bags of the acrylic coated infill ready for install at FHS in August 2017

Sunday, December 15, 2019

Pantherbook: "Toxic Turf at Beaver Pond?"

Via Pantherbook:
"Have you ever played on the field at Beaver Pond in Franklin, MA? Many kids have. Little do they know, discarded turf from the field has been decomposing in the pond’s wetlands for over two years."
Continue reading the Pantherbook article online
https://franklinpanthers.us/top-stories/2019/12/11/toxic-turf-at-beaver-pond/

The Pantherbook posting was prescient as the Boston Globe published this:
"Amid growing concerns about toxic chemicals in the water supply, state regulators Friday announced significant new limits on the human-made compounds in drinking water and approved new requirements ordering polluters to clean up contaminated soil and ground water. 
The long-awaited rules come as environmental officials acknowledge that the per- and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals, known as PFAS, have been found in a growing number of communities across the state. 
The chemicals, which have been linked to cancer, low infant birth weights, and a range of diseases, have been found so far in 28 of 37 municipal water systems that have provided test results to the state Department of Environmental Protection, officials said this week. Of those, 12 found that the amounts exceed the proposed standards for drinking water."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/12/13/massachusetts-issues-new-standards-for-forever-chemicals-water-supply/dz25i9Sk92QfiDl5TeSJFL/story.html

And as an update to the previously shared listing on the "turf issue":

What we know:


What we don’t know:


  • What happened to the Conservation Commission mitigation measures from when the field was first installed (in 2004?)?
  • Where was the old carpet and bags of unused infill taken?
  • What will the Federal agencies do with PFAS and the recent revelations (if anything)?


bags of the acrylic coated infill ready for install at FHS in August 2017
new turf carpet being installed at Beaver St field in 2017
new turf carpet being installed at Beaver St field in August 2017

Friday, December 6, 2019

FM #184 - Town Administrator's Report to Town Council - 12/4/19

FM #184

This internet radio show or podcast is number 184 in the series for Franklin Matters.

This recording shares Town Administrator Report segment from the Town Council meeting held on Wednesday, Dec 4, 2019.

Updates on:

  • New Board of Health Director, Cathy Liberty replacing David McKearnery who is retiring
  • Cindy Souza, of Animal Control is also retiring sometime in January
  • Update the turf field issue now that the DEP letter has arrived
  • Open Meeting Law special session on Dec 11
  • Thanks to the DPW and others for the look of the Town Common
  • Thanks to the DPW for their work on the first and long snow fall this week
  • Update on the Spring St issue raised by the Cochran’s in the Citizen Comments section


Maybe I am getting lazy, maybe it is just worth a try, Jamie’s update from each Town Council meeting is not covered in detail by my notes (and yes, I strive to get better on that) so I thought it important to share the audio of his report to the Town Council in a timely manner. The Town generally publishes an “Actions Taken” doc to highlight the recorded votes. So rather than wait for the full minutes to be approved and available, I’ll share the audio segment of the TA Report.

The statement runs approx 9 minutes.

Link to DEP letter as mentioned
https://drive.google.com/file/d/15WMp_zZiMXs_7MfpUQJd5hgtaVbrlkY_/view?usp=sharing

https://www.hipcast.com/podcast/Hc0j5J4X




What we know about the "turf issue":



What we don’t know:


  • What happened to the Conservation Commission mitigation measures from when the field was first installed (in 2004?)?
  • Where was the old carpet and bags of unused infill taken?
  • What will the State and/or Federal agencies do with PFAS and the recent revelations (if anything)?

-------------

This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but I can't do it alone. I can always use your help.

How can you help?

Overall:
  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors.
  • If you don't like this, please let me know.

Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements.
Thank you for listening.

For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/
If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com

The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana" c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.

I hope you enjoy!

------------


The prior statement by Jamie Hellen can be found online


------------------

You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"


search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"
search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"