Showing posts with label Pew Research. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Pew Research. Show all posts

Wednesday, December 9, 2020

"Survey-based measurement of news consumption is not without its own problems"

From the Pew Research Center comes a study on measuring news consumption:

"Given the increasing complexity and interconnectedness of this news landscape and concerns around overreporting of news consumption, Pew Research Center wanted to explore how best to measure news consumption: Where do currently used survey practices still work and where might changes be in order?

This report is the culmination of this effort and is organized into three sections: Chapter 1 looks at the U.S. public’s familiarity with newer concepts related to news; Chapter 2 examines possible ways to improve survey-based measures of news consumption; and Chapter 3 compares survey results to the use of passive data that comes straight from tracking software news consumers downloaded to their digital devices.

Americans are largely familiar with new technologies but often don’t think of them as news sources."

"Survey-based measurement of news consumption is not without its own problems"
"Survey-based measurement of news consumption is not without its own problems" (Pew Research photo)



Saturday, May 9, 2020

PEW: The State of Trust, Facts, and Democracy

Stat: 59 percent: The percentage of Americans who say they have little to no confidence in the public’s political wisdom.

Story: As the new year—and an election year—begins, we turn to data on our democracy to learn more about how Americans view institutions and civic life today. Host Dan LeDuc speaks with Michael Dimock, president of the Pew Research Center, about the latest research on trust, facts, and democracy in America.

Listen here  https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/articles/2020/01/10/the-state-of-trust-facts-and-democracy

PEW: The State of Trust, Facts, and Democracy
PEW: The State of Trust, Facts, and Democracy

Thursday, October 17, 2019

voters in both parties “not only disagree over plans and policies, but also cannot agree on the basic facts”

We need to do something about this. If we, fellow residents and neighbors within Franklin, can not conduct a civil conversation, we are all in trouble. 

Where do we start? 
 
"Three years ago, Pew Research Center found that the 2016 presidential campaign was “unfolding against a backdrop of intense partisan division and animosity.” Today, the level of division and animosity – including negative sentiments among partisans toward the members of the opposing party – has only deepened.

...

For the most part, Republicans are more likely than Democrats to ascribe negative characteristics to people in the opposing party, with one exception: 75% of Democrats say Republicans are “more closed-minded” than other Americans, while 64% of Republicans say the same about Democrats.

Most partisans view the other side as ‘closed-minded’; Republicans see Democrats as ‘unpatriotic’ Yet Republicans are far more likely than Democrats to view members of the opposing party as unpatriotic. A 63% majority of Republicans say that, compared with other Americans, Democrats are “more unpatriotic.” Just 23% of Democrats say the same about Republicans.

The survey also finds that partisan hostility extends beyond politics. Fewer than half of Democrats (45%) and just 38% of Republicans say that while members of the other party feel differently about politics, they share many of their other values and goals. Majorities in both parties say those in the opposing party do not share their nonpolitical values and goals."

Continue reading the article at the Pew Research Center page
https://www.people-press.org/2019/10/10/partisan-antipathy-more-intense-more-personal/


voters in both parties “not only disagree over plans and policies, but also cannot agree on the basic facts”
voters in both parties “not only disagree over plans and policies, but also cannot agree on the basic facts”

Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Pew Research Center: How random sampling is used in surveys

"Here at Pew Research Center, we are often asked about how we conduct our research. We work hard to make our methodologies transparent and understandable, but we also know that survey mode effects and data weighting aren’t on everyone’s short list of water-cooler conversation topics.

That’s why we’re launching Methods 101, a new occasional video series dedicated to explaining and educating the public about the basic methods we use to conduct our survey research. We hope this effort will make survey methods more accessible, even if you’re not a statistician or pollster. We also hope it will help give our audience the confidence to be savvy consumers of all polls.

Our first video is about random sampling, a concept that undergirds all probability-based survey research. The video explains what it means and why it’s important. We hope you’ll find it useful."
https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/05/12/methods-101-random-sampling/

 https://youtu.be/sonXfzE1hvo




https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/05/12/methods-101-random-sampling/






Sunday, August 4, 2019

"Teachers eventually get to a living wage, but it takes 20 years to get there"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Paul O’Donoghue, 24, was sporting sunglasses and a Franklin Recreation Camp T-shirt on a humid July afternoon at King Street Memorial Park.

“I can’t complain – I get to play dodgeball and kickball with little kids,” he said.

O’Donoghue has been a camp director for the last four years, earning about $17 an hour. But during the school year, he goes by “Mr. O’Donoghue,” a math teacher at Franklin High School, earning about twice as much.

“I’m in the career that I think I’m meant for,” said O’Donoghue, a second-year teacher and Worcester resident who started at Franklin Recreation as a camper, then as a counselor in 2011. Teachers had a “really big impact” on his life, and he wanted to do the same for his students, he said."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190803/area-teachers-supplement-modest-salaries-with-second-jobs

Details on the Pew Research Center can be found
https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/07/01/about-one-in-six-u-s-teachers-work-second-jobs-and-not-just-in-the-summer/

During the school year, roughly a quarter (26%) of male teachers had a second job, compared with 15% of female teachers.
During the school year, roughly a quarter (26%) of male teachers had a second job, compared with 15% of female teachers.