Showing posts with label salary. Show all posts
Showing posts with label salary. Show all posts

Sunday, June 5, 2022

Franklin, MA: Town Council - agenda - June 8, 2022 at 7 PM

FRANKLIN TOWN COUNCIL
Agenda & Meeting Packet
June 8, 2022 - 7 PM

1. ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE CHAIR
a. This meeting is being recorded by Franklin TV and shown on Comcast channel 11 and Verizon Channel 29. This meeting may be recorded by others.
b. Chair to identify members participating remotely.
2. CITIZEN COMMENTS
a. Citizens are welcome to express their views for up to three minutes on a matter that is not on the agenda. The Council will not engage in a dialogue or comment on a matter raised during Citizen Comments. The Town Council will give remarks appropriate consideration and may ask the Town Administrator to review the matter.
3. APPROVAL OF MINUTES

4. PROCLAMATIONS / RECOGNITIONS
a. Proclamation - Franklin Flyers Youth Hockey Team
b. Proclamation - Franklin High School Theatre Company
 
5. APPOINTMENTS - None Scheduled.
6. HEARINGS - 7:00 pm - None Scheduled.

7. LICENSE TRANSACTIONS
a. License Modification: Change of Hours - PH Franklin, Inc. d/b/a Raillery Public House, Located at 280 Franklin Village Drive, Franklin, MA 02038  https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif6896/f/uploads/7a._raillery_change_of_hours.pdf
b. New Farmer Winery-Farmers Market License - Crave Mead, LLC d/b/a Crave Mead, Located at 7 Main St., Unit 1, Blackstone, MA 01504  https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif6896/f/uploads/7b._farmers_market_license_-_crave.pdf
8. PRESENTATIONS / DISCUSSION
a. Presentation/Discussion: North Grove Priority Development Area Redevelopment Concept -

9. LEGISLATION FOR ACTION
a. Resolution 22-32: Salary Schedule: Full-Time Elected Official - Town Clerk (Motion to Approve
b. Resolution 22-30: FY22 Capital Plan Round 2 (Motion to Approve Resolution 22-30 -
c. Resolution 22-34: Gift Acceptance - Senior Center ($100), Fire Department ($50) (Motion to
d. Resolution 22-35: Cable Funds in Support of PEG Service and Programming per MGL Ch. 44,
§53F3/4 (Motion to Approve Resolution 22-35 - Majority Vote)  https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif6896/f/uploads/9d._22-35_peg_comcast_verizon.pdf
e. Resolution 22-39: Authorizing the Additional Borrowing of Money to Pay Additional Costs of the
Beaver Street Interceptor Replacement Project (Motion to Approve Resolution 22-39 - Two

10. TOWN ADMINISTRATOR’S REPORT - None Scheduled.

11. SUBCOMMITTEE & AD HOC COMMITTEE REPORTS
a. Capital Budget Subcommittee
b. Budget Subcommittee
c. Economic Development Subcommittee

12. FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS

13. COUNCIL COMMENTS

14. EXECUTIVE SESSION
a. Exemption #6: To consider the purchase, exchange, lease or value of real property, because an open meeting may have a detrimental effect on the negotiating position of the public body and the chair so declares.  i. Schmidt’s Farm, Prospect Street

15. ADJOURN

Note:
Two-Thirds Vote: requires 6 votes
Majority Vote: requires majority of members present and voting


Franklin, MA: Town Council - agenda - June 8, 2022 at 7 PM
Franklin, MA: Town Council - agenda - June 8, 2022 at 7 PM

Tuesday, August 17, 2021

Mapped | The U.S. States with the Top Tech Salaries in 2021 💵 MA is #5


Mapped | The U.S. States with the Top Tech Salaries in 2021 💵 MA is #5

  FEATURED STORY  
The U.S. States with the Top Tech Salaries in 2021


In America, tech jobs pay about 61% more than the average salary.

Here's a look at which states have the highest tech salaries.

Read more
 
The U.S. States with the Top Tech Salaries in 2021 💵 MA is #5
View the Map
Check out the article -> https://www.visualcapitalist.com/us-states-top-tech-salaries-2021/

Sunday, August 4, 2019

"Teachers eventually get to a living wage, but it takes 20 years to get there"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Paul O’Donoghue, 24, was sporting sunglasses and a Franklin Recreation Camp T-shirt on a humid July afternoon at King Street Memorial Park.

“I can’t complain – I get to play dodgeball and kickball with little kids,” he said.

O’Donoghue has been a camp director for the last four years, earning about $17 an hour. But during the school year, he goes by “Mr. O’Donoghue,” a math teacher at Franklin High School, earning about twice as much.

“I’m in the career that I think I’m meant for,” said O’Donoghue, a second-year teacher and Worcester resident who started at Franklin Recreation as a camper, then as a counselor in 2011. Teachers had a “really big impact” on his life, and he wanted to do the same for his students, he said."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190803/area-teachers-supplement-modest-salaries-with-second-jobs

Details on the Pew Research Center can be found
https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2019/07/01/about-one-in-six-u-s-teachers-work-second-jobs-and-not-just-in-the-summer/

During the school year, roughly a quarter (26%) of male teachers had a second job, compared with 15% of female teachers.
During the school year, roughly a quarter (26%) of male teachers had a second job, compared with 15% of female teachers.

Sunday, March 10, 2019

"Of the 62 public requests filed, only about half were successful"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Sunshine Week: These are the highest-paid employees in the Milford area"
"How much do municipal workers make? 
Across the globe, governments are publishing more of their records online, putting information in the hands of citizens who could help improve the public sector. 
But in the era of big data, when any piece of information seems a Google search away, try finding the salary of your local police chief. 
With more limited resources, cities and towns often lag behind in making their records available to the public. To help narrow the gap, the Daily News will launch an effort today to provide readers more insight into spending in their own backyards."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190310/sunshine-week-these-are-highest-paid-employees-in-milford-area

Editor note: I hesitated to post this as more information is needed for a worthwhile comparison. While the article and payroll tool provides salary and compensation data, it does not provide the context on the size of the community and budget or work load to help make the comparison fair. Simply using the data provided is comparing apples to oranges. As a result of multiple discussions over the years on making the case to position Franklin appropriately with communities of its size and operational scope, this is not an easy task. So while the real picture is not available, be aware, that at least some data is.

I would rather have had the focus on the fact that 55% of the information requests were actually fulfilled. For a Sunshine week impact, there is not a lot of sun shining.

Sunday, December 30, 2018

In the News: minimum age for tobacco products becomes 21; MA cabinet level get pay raise

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

Minimum age for tobacco now 21

"Nearly 14 years after Needham became the first town in the country to ban tobacco sales to people under 21, the higher purchase age for cigarettes and other tobacco products will kick in across the state on Monday. 
Gov. Charlie Baker in July signed a bill imposing new restrictions on tobacco products in Massachusetts, with an effective date of Dec. 31, 2018. 
Along with raising the minimum age for buying tobacco products from its current 18, the law prohibits the sale of tobacco products by pharmacies and bans the use of e-cigarettes in places where state law already prohibits smoking. 
The use of tobacco products including e-cigarettes will also be prohibited on the grounds of any public or private primary, secondary, or vocational school."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20181229/minimum-age-for-buy-tobacco-jumps-to-21-on-monday

For additional information on the minimum age for tobacco products
https://www.mass.gov/massachusetts-tobacco-cessation-and-prevention-program-mtcp

https://twitter.com/MakeSmkngHistry
https://twitter.com/MakeSmkngHistry

Governor's cabinet get pay raise

"Chief Human Resources Officer Ronald Arigo outlined the raises, which are effective Jan. 1, in a memo to the secretaries and their chiefs of staff and human resources directors Friday, a day after salary increases for lawmakers and constitutional officers were announced. 
The 5.5 percent raise will bring the salary for cabinet secretaries up to $170,405.71 from the current $161,522. 
Agency heads and commissioners will not be eligible for the pay hike if they entered their role on or after Jan. 2, 2018. Acting or interim appointees and 120-day appointees are ineligible, Arigo wrote. 
Most members of Baker’s office will also receive the same 5.5 percent increase effective next Tuesday, with recent hires ineligible. According to the governor’s office, staff there have not received the merit pay increases other executive branch managers received over the past four years."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20181229/bakers-cabinet-secretaries-others-to-see-55-percent-raises

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Shhh, I Make More than My Husband



A puzzling thing can happen when wives earn more than their husbands do.

united states census bureau

America Counts: Stories Behind the Numbers

Shhh... I Make More than My Husband

Shhh... I Make More than My Husband

When wives earn more than their husbands do, a puzzling thing can happen: Husbands say they earn more than they are and wives underreport their income.

Read More

New Census Bureau research shows that the incomes couples report on Census Bureau surveys do not always match their IRS filings. The Census Bureau is working to improve the quality of reported earnings by comparing an individual's survey response with their reported response from another source.

The America Counts Team
If you like this story, use the hashtag #AmericaCounts to share it on social media. 

About America Counts

America Counts tells the stories behind the numbers in a new inviting way. It features stories on various topics such as families, housing, employment, business, education, the economy, emergency preparedness, and population. Contact our Public Information Office for media inquiries or interviews. 

Thursday, May 10, 2018

MassBudget: Wages, incomes, and overcoming obstacles to economic opportunity



MassBudget  Information.
  Participation.
 Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center  Democracy.

May 9, 2018
Obstacles on the Road to Opportunity:
Finding a Way Forward



Effective programs that help families make ends meet - like the Earned Income Tax Credit, SNAP, school lunches, and Social Security - cut the number of Massachusetts residents living in poverty by almost half. Such programs also cut the number of children living in poverty by more than half, according to a relatively new measure developed by the Census Bureau.
The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center's new report, Obstacles on the Road to Opportunity: Finding a Way Forward, finds that while effective public programs can help remove obstacles along the road to opportunity, good jobs play a central role in paving that road. While incomes of high-income households have grown considerably over the past several decades, this has not been the case for low and moderate-wage workers.
The report notes that national economic policies have allowed wages to stagnate and that important work support programs are at risk of being cut by the federal government. In some Massachusetts communities, more than one in four children lives below the official federal poverty line. Such conditions and a lack of resources create obstacles to opportunity for children.

MassBudget: Wages, incomes, and overcoming obstacles to economic opportunity

The report will be released today at a forum hosted by the Massachusetts Association for Community Action (MASSCAP). It contains a variety of usable data, including detailed data about municipalities across the Commonwealth. Read the report here.


The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget) produces policy research, analysis, and data-driven recommendations focused on improving the lives of low- and middle-income children and adults, strengthening our state's economy, and enhancing the quality of life in Massachusetts.

MASSACHUSETTS BUDGET AND POLICY CENTER

15 COURT SQUARE, SUITE 700
BOSTON, MA 02108


Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 15 Court Square, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02108

Sent by nberger@massbudget.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact

Friday, July 22, 2016

In the News: workshop to address college stress, salary data research request struggles

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"Citing a desire to lower stress among soon-to-be college students, several local organizations are collaborating on new college transition workshops. 
The sessions - set to take place Aug. 9 and Aug. 16 - will be free to the public, and are the product of a partnership between the Hockomock Area YMCA, Dean College, Franklin public schools, the SAFE Coalition, Community Impact, New Hope and state Rep. Jeffrey Roy, D-Franklin, among others. Both workshops will take place in the Franklin High School lecture hall, and will run from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. 
School Committee member Anne Bergen, who also sits on the YMCA's Board of Managers, said the workshops were designed to meet a perceived need in the about-to-go-to-college group."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20160721/franklin-groups-hope-to-ease-stress-for-new-college-students



"Only two school districts in the area have complied with a researcher's statewide records request for the salaries of teachers and administrators broken down by gender. 
The request, filed by Brigham Young University researcher Joseph Price, is the subject of a recent statewide order from Shawn Williams, supervisor of records. Every district that did not respond, according to the July 13 order, must do so and undergo training in Public Record Law. 
Most area districts didn't respond. Some which did respond requested anywhere from $100 to almost $3,000 to provide the data. 
Price's request was for salary data from 1995 to 2016, divided by gender, job title, education and experience. The data was intended to bolster a national study of the gender pay gap among educators."


Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20160721/local-school-districts-struggle-to-produce-salary-data

Wednesday, February 12, 2014

MassBudget: Job Growth Unrelated to States' Tipped Minimum Wage



MassBudget  Information.
  Participation.
 Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center  Democracy.

The Tipped Minimum Wage & Job Growth

A strong minimum wage helps workers support their families, and it can bolster our economy by increasing the amount of money workers have to spend at local businesses. 

In the case of workers who regularly earn tips, like waiters and hairdressers, employers are only required to pay what's called the "tipped minimum wage," which in Massachusetts is well below the regular minimum wage (it is currently $2.63). The law then requires that for any such worker, the combination of hourly pay and tips must be at least as high as the full minimum wage.
   
Our new factsheet, Job Growth Unrelated to States' Tipped Minimum Wage explores the impact of tipped minimum wage levels on employment in the restaurant and food service job sectors. The new factsheet finds that:  

  • Historically, Massachusetts - with its low tipped minimum wage - has not reliably outperformed high tipped minimum states or the US average for job growth in the restaurant industry

  • Despite Massachusetts low tipped minimum, the restaurant industry itself does not projection strong job growth in Massachusetts over the coming decade, nor meaningfully higher job growth in low tipped minimum states vs. high tipped minimum states generally

  • Tipped workers in states with higher tipped minimum wages have higher earnings and lower poverty rates

 
The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget) produces policy research, analysis, and data-driven recommendations focused on improving the lives of low- and middle-income children and adults, strengthening our state's economy, and enhancing the quality of life in Massachusetts.

MASSACHUSETTS BUDGET AND POLICY CENTER
15 COURT SQUARE, SUITE 700
BOSTON, MA 02108
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Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center | 15 Court Square | Suite 700 | Boston | MA | 02108

Saturday, April 4, 2009

A rose is a rose is a wage increase

Gertrude Stein would roll over if she heard that a wage freeze is not really a wage freeze. Yes, Gertrude is the one who wrote the oft quoted lines:
"Rose is a rose is a rose is a rose"
There are at least four key terms that we should all be aware of and agree on how they are to be used; freeze, increase, step, lane.

Freeze as I want to use it is defined as "a halt of a regular operation"

Step is the increase associated with moving from one salary step to another, usually associated with years of service.

Lane is the increase associated with moving from one classification on a step to another.

Increase is an amount more in one period than in the comparable period.

For example, the salary table may look like this for one year.

Step Bachelor B +15 B+36/M
1 38,010 39,501 41,759
2 39,935 41,813 44,071
3 42,688 44,130 46,387

Someone would get hired with a bachelors degree and start on Step 1 for their first year.

In year 2, they would move to Step 2. (Step as defined above results in an increase from 38,010 to 39,935.)

If they completed 15 credits towards their next degree, in Year 3 they could make a Lane change and move to the B+15 column. So instead of earning 42,688 with a Step change, they would earn 44,130 with a Lane change.

The entire salary table would change from one year to the next based upon contract negotiation. If the union was successful in negotiating a 2.5% increase, then each number in the table would be increased by 2.5% for the next year. The second year table would look like this:

Step Bachelor B +15 B+36/M
1 38,960 40,489 42,803
2 40,933 42,858 45,173
3 43,755 45,233 47,547

Calculate the difference between Bachelor Step 1 in the first table (38,010) and the second table (38,960) the difference is 950 or 2.499% which rounds to 2.5%.

Why do this?
Well according to the information I have received, the wage freezes announced by the town only include the increase from year to year, they do not include the step or lane changes.

So if this is true, don't be too surprised when the budget comes out and the total salary lines are actually higher than last year.

Where did the wage freeze go?

No wonder Shakespeare said "A rose by any other name would smell as sweet"

Sunday, March 8, 2009

"how far can you sacrifice before it doesn't make sense"

By Rachel Lebeaux Globe Correspondent / March 8, 2009

Officials in Franklin, Milford, and Holliston have offered to forgo raises to help close ballooning deficits as tax revenue and state aid to communities plummet. In some cases, administrators are hoping that unionized employees will follow suit.

But unions - particularly those representing school teachers, the largest group of municipal workers in most communities - might not be so quick to follow.

Read the full article on efforts to control budgets with salary freezes in the Boston Globe West section here