Showing posts with label transportation. Show all posts
Showing posts with label transportation. Show all posts

Friday, May 6, 2022

Making Sense of Climate #8 - discussing transportation in a climate ready Franklin - 04/27/22 (audio)

FM #788 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 789 in the series. 


This session of the radio show shares my conversation with Ted McIntyre, Franklin resident and climate activist. We are also joined by Marissa B, from the 350 MA Franklin Node group. We recorded this via the Zoom conference bridge Apr 27, 2022.  

Ted helps me “make sense of climate” and we hope this helps with your understanding as well. Marissa joined Ted and I for this session.

If you have climate questions or Franklin specific climate questions, send them in and we’ll try to answer them in a future session 

The recording runs about 45 minutes, so let’s listen to my conversation with Marissa and Ted McIntyre as he helps us “make sense of climate” regarding transportation in a climate ready Franklin.

Audio file -> https://franklin-ma-matters.captivate.fm/episode/fm-788-making-sense-of-climate-8-04-27-22

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Articles referenced

IPCC - Chapter 5 https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg3/ 

The pdf of the chapter in the 2033 mitigation report

https://report.ipcc.ch/ar6wg3/pdf/IPCC_AR6_WGIII_FinalDraft_Chapter05.pdf

Good2Go - pilot of electric vehicle rental in four locations within Boston

https://www.mapc.org/news/boston-kicks-off-new-electric-vehicle-car-share-program/

Complete streets via MASS DOT https://www.mass.gov/complete-streets-funding-program

Town of Franklin “Complete Streets” https://www.franklinma.gov/engineering/pages/complete-streets 

The day the trolley died - somewhere in the 1920’s  https://franklinobserver.town.news/g/franklin-town-ma/n/57968/hometown-history-12-streetcar-named-expire 

Here is the Westervelt discussion

https://www.drilledpodcast.com/debunking-demand-ipcc-mitigation-report-part-1/

Here is a more pointed analysis

https://braveneweurope.com/timothee-parrique-degrowth-for-the-first-time-in-ipcc-report

See the page that collects the “Making Sense of Climate” episodes ->

https://www.franklinmatters.org/2022/02/making-sense-of-climate-collection.html 

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We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial.  

This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.

How can you help?

  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors

  • If you don't like something here, please let me know

Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.

For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/ or www.franklin.news/

If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com

The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.

I hope you enjoy!

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You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"

Franklin Historical Museum photo of trolley car from back in the day
Franklin Historical Museum photo of trolley car from back in the day

Thursday, May 5, 2022

Conversation with Town Councilor Cobi Frongillo - 05/02/22 (audio)

FM #787 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 787 in the series. 


This session of the radio show shares my conversation with Town Councilor Cobi Frongillo conducted in the Franklin TV/Franklin Public Radio Studio on May 2, 2022. 


We talk about Cobi’s recent conference trip and recent bike ride around Franklin. 


The recording runs about 53 minutes, so let’s listen to my conversation with Cobi as we discuss the conference takeaways, housing, transportation, zoning, and how it applies to Franklin.


Audio file -> https://franklin-ma-matters.captivate.fm/episode/fm-787-conversation-with-cobi-frongillo-05-02-22


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Conference website -> https://yimby.town/ 

Session streaming links -> https://yimby.town/streaming/ 


Day 1 conference thread - https://drive.google.com/file/d/1wHt5Bl16d_q-ZwnBJ57VTI8dpIYIPHQP/view?usp=sharing 


Day 2 conference thread - 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Gson071ISyJ8NzmdYmigBeheJvDMjCRV/view?usp=sharing 


Day 3 conference thread -

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1lXmGwa7roYyLZ96LN33H-fycFGCgEY4I/view?usp=sharing 


Mass Housing Partnership’s “DataTown” highlights for Franklin

https://drive.google.com/file/d/12huqmolj_QI3GK1jOqQZGC4wQswTci2x/view?usp=sharing


Bike ride thread -> 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1DG0iuZH0MmITC6GVDqL_zsZSV--9eq4s/view?usp=sharing 


--------------


We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial. 


This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.

 

How can you help?

  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors

  • If you don't like something here, please let me know


Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.

 

For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/  or www.franklin.news 


If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com


The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.


I hope you enjoy!

------------------


You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"

 

one of the data points from the Mass Housing Partnership’s “DataTown” highlights for Franklin
one of the data points from the Mass Housing Partnership’s “DataTown” highlights for Franklin

Friday, March 25, 2022

Governor wants to reimage downtowns; offers businesses a $4K hiring bonus

“The future of downtowns is going to be different, whether we like it or not,” Gov. Charlie Baker told the breakfast gathering. “We need to start the process of reimagining the placemaking of downtowns so they can thrive and be successful in what will be a slightly different world in many cases and a significantly different world in some cases.”

Baker plans to file an economic development bill to aid downtowns struggling amid the work-from-home pattern that took hold during the pandemic – and seems here to stay, at least in some form. The Legislature deep-sixed a downtown aid package Baker filed last year. Details of the new proposal have not been revealed, but the Globe said Baker expects to propose using a combination of bonding and the $2 billion in unspent American Rescue Plan Act money to fund the plan. "

Continue reading the article online

"FRUSTRATED AT the disconnect in Massachusetts between available jobs and available employees, the Baker administration is offering for-profit and non-profit employers $4,000 for each new worker they hire this year.

The goal of the HireNow program is to give employers an incentive to recruit and train workers who they normally would not bring in for an interview because of their lack of skills. “This is a great opportunity to say there’s no experience needed,” said Rosalin Acosta, the governor’s secretary of labor and workforce development. She unveiled the program along with Gov. Charlie Baker and Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito at a press conference Wednesday at LabCentral, a Cambridge-based incubator in the biotech and life sciences sectors."
Continue reading the article online
 

Saturday, March 19, 2022

Ted McIntyre helps me with Marking Sense of Climate - Part 5 - 03/15/22 (audio)

FM #753 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 753 in the series. 

This session of the radio show shares my conversation with Ted McIntyre, Franklin resident and climate activist. We recorded this via the Zoom conference bridge Mar 15, 2022.  

This is part 5 of a series on Marking Sense of ClimateTed helps me “make sense of climate” and we hope this helps with your understanding as well. 

If you have climate questions or Franklin specific climate questions, send them in and we’ll try to answer them in a future session 

The recording runs about 49 minutes, so let’s listen to my conversation with Ted McIntyre as he helps me “make sense of climate.”

Audio file -> https://franklin-ma-matters.captivate.fm/episode/fm-754-making-sense-of-climate-5-03-15-22

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Links that are our talking points for this episode

Transit system electrification
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2022/03/state-news-roundup-health-care-costs.html

NY Times article on induction cookers -> https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-portable-induction-cooktop/ 

DOER Stretch goals (deadline extended to March 18 to submit input)


Good first step wind bill, but Baker objects over fees…
https://www.bostonglobe.com/2022/03/02/opinion/offshore-wind-is-future-massachusetts/?event=event12
https://www.wickedlocal.com/story/regional/2022/03/04/mass-house-offshore-wind-bill-faces-headwinds-baker/9373537002/
 
Municipal Light Plants (MLP) and the Peabody Peaker
New studies find cheaper to 'buy from market'
Hunger strikers oppose construction


Ukraine…
Debate No-fly zone etc….
Hundreds of millions to Russia every day for gas.
daily payment to Russia for EU gas
https://www.voanews.com/a/despite-sanctions-europe-continues-to-bankroll-russia-for-gas-oil/6465223.html

McKibben’s piece on “heat pumps for peace”   https://billmckibben.substack.com/p/heat-pumps-for-peace-and-freedom?s=r 

If you have a question to raise, you can use this form -> https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/02/ask-franklin-matters-you-ask-question.html
 
Original Climate link = The 13 point article we talk to -> From WBUR -> “What you need to know about the new MASS Climate law” https://www.wbur.org/news/2021/03/26/new-mass-climate-law-faq
 
Mass Climate Action Network -> https://www.massclimateaction.org/recs 
 
--------------

We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial.  

This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.
 
How can you help?
  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors
  • If you don't like something here, please let me know

Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.

For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/ or www.franklin.news/

If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com

The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.

I hope you enjoy!

------------------

You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters" 

NY Times - Wirecutter - induction cook tops (Photo: Michael Murtaugh)
NY Times - Wirecutter - induction cook tops (Photo: Michael Murtaugh)


Tuesday, March 15, 2022

State News Roundup: health care costs; early childhood education; transit system electrification

What this report will mean for the Town budget remains to be seen. We heard last week (Joint Budget Subcommittee meeting) that the Town is expecting to get the new health care rates in a couple of weeks. Both Town and School budgets forecast an increase of 5-8 percent: 

"After years of ever-increasing spending on health care that left policymakers struggling to contain costs, Massachusetts finally found the key to lowering spending on health care: a global pandemic.  
Ironically, spending on health care declined by 2.4 percent in Massachusetts in 2020, an unprecedented drop that can be attributed to fewer people seeking care during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a report released Monday by the Center for Health Information and Analysis."
Continue reading the article online

A logical extension of MA law to include early childhood education in the overall education system to bring about more equity is going to cost.

"MASSACHUSETTS’S EARLY CHILDHOOD education system is unaffordable and inaccessible to too many families, and it will cost an estimated $1.5 billion a year to improve it, according to a report released Monday by a special legislative commission looking at the economics of early education and care.  
The commission, led by Education Committee co-chairs Sen. Jason Lewis and Rep. Alice Peisch, calls for expanding the subsidies available to families while increasing financial support to childcare centers themselves and their workers. But it stops short of calling for universal public pre-kindergarten, as some activists have been calling for. "

Moving the public transit system to reduce the use of fossil fuels is timely and necessary:
"WARNING THAT the pace of electrification underway for the MBTA’s bus fleet is “too slow for the Legislature,” a top senator is newly forecasting that his chamber plans to make the transportation sector a focus in upcoming climate legislation.

Sen. Michael Barrett, who co-chairs the Telecommunications, Utilities and Energy Committee, told leaders of the Baker administration’s transportation secretariat on Friday that he expects a forthcoming Senate bill will make another pass at requiring the T to transition its bus network to full electrification by a specific date.  "
Continue reading the article online

State News Roundup: health care costs; early childhood education; transit system electrification
State News Roundup: health care costs; early childhood education; transit system electrification

Tuesday, March 8, 2022

MBTA Commuter Rail challenges highlighted by incident on Worcester Line


"Tarang Shah of TransitMatters uses a breakdown on the Worcester commuter rail line to provide some valuable lessons on what's still missing as the MBTA tries to provide reliable service." 
Read the article online ->  https://t.co/XMTdcn1Syc  



MBTA Commuter Rail challenges highlighted by incident on Worcester Line
MBTA Commuter Rail challenges highlighted by incident on Worcester Line

Saturday, February 26, 2022

Make it easier: "We humans are organisms, so we do what they do"

As we get into the discussion about what downtown Franklin should be like, we can consider the axiom of biology Jarrett Walker talks of in this article: 

"Induced demand is the observed fact that if you make something easier to do, people will do it more.  For example, if you create new capacity for cars in a place where travel demand is high, the result is more cars.  If you build more capacity to “fix congestion”, you end up back near the same level of congestion you had before.

After decades of observing this pattern, most people, including many road-building authorities, are still reluctant to face what this means.  Part of the problem, surely, is that we’re presenting induced demand as an observed discovery, allowing us to perform quarrels over data, research methods etc.

But induced demand isn’t just an observed fact.  It’s also an axiom of biology, so we are as sure about it as we are of the facts of math.  This means we don’t really need to be doing this experiment over and over, just as we don’t need to keep measuring circles to be sure of the value of pi."
Continue reading the article online

Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Strong Towns Event @ THE BLACK BOX - 11/15/21 (audio)

FM #661 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 661 in the series. 


This session of the radio show shares the Strong Towns Town Hall event with Congressman Jake Auchincloss, State Rep Jeff Roy, Franklin Town Councilor Cobi Frongillo, and Charles Marohn from Strong Towns. 


The event was held at THE BLACK BOX and broadcast via Franklin TV and Zoom. 


After a round of opening remarks, there is a question and answer period with audience participation. Each question asker identifies themselves so you should be able to follow along.

 

The recording runs about 1  hour and 14 minutes, so let’s listen to the Strong Towns Event on Nov 15, 2021. Audio file -> https://player.captivate.fm/episode/9af1799e-c16d-4b73-8329-74515b343b2f



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My notes from the session

https://www.franklinmatters.org/2021/11/recap-strong-towns-event-fostering.html 


More about Strong Towns can be found online -> https://www.strongtowns.org/


--------------


We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial.  


This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.

 

How can you help?

  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors

  • If you don't like something here, please let me know


Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.


For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/ or www.franklin.news/


If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com


The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.


I hope you enjoy!

------------------


You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"

 


Friday, July 16, 2021

MA Legislature Passes Bill Authorizing $350 Million in Funding for Transportation Infrastructure


MA Legislature Passes Bill Authorizing $350 Million in Funding for Transportation Infrastructure

 

 

Massachusetts Legislature Passes Bill Authorizing $350 Million in Funding for Transportation Infrastructure

The Massachusetts Legislature on Thursday passed a bill that will invest $350 million in municipal transportation and selected statewide transportation infrastructure projects.

The bill, An Act financing improvements to municipal roads and bridges, authorizes $200 million for municipal roads and bridges through the chapter 90 program and $150 million to support statewide projects to address congestion, support electric vehicle infrastructure, prioritize bus infrastructure, and improve public transit.

"As travel returns to pre-COVID levels, our transportation system has a vital role to play in getting us back to better," stated Senate President Karen E. Spilka (D-Ashland). "The Chapter 90 proposal advanced by the Senate and House today authorizes $200 million for roads and bridges across our state and makes additional investments in emerging electric vehicle infrastructure which will greatly benefit the Commonwealth's residents. Passage of this legislation is critical to maintaining a transportation system that is sustainable, reliable, accessible and climate resilient. I am grateful to Senators Rodrigues, Boncore, and Feeney as well as Speaker Mariano, Rep. Michlewitz, Rep. Straus, Gregoire and their staffs for their collaboration."

"I would like to thank Chairs Michlewitz, Straus and Gregoire, as well as Senate President Spilka and her colleagues, for their work on the Chapter 90 bill," said Speaker of the House Ronald J. Mariano (D-Quincy). "This bill not only authorizes $200 million for roads and bridges but advances our priorities by investing in projects that municipalities will use to improve our transportation system, such as increased access to transit and specifically buses."

"As we continue building back to our new better, Chapter 90 funding remains an important mechanism through which the state can directly support cities and towns in Massachusetts," said Senator Michael J. Rodrigues (D -Westport), Chair of the Senate Committee on Ways and Means. "Thank you to Senate President Spilka and Senators Boncore and Feeney for their leadership, and to my colleagues in the Legislature for their urgency to direct funding to projects that will make a real difference in their communities and strengthen our local infrastructure across the Commonwealth." 

"These critical funds will ensure that our transportation needs are addressed all across the Commonwealth" said Representative Aaron Michlewitz, Chair of the House Committee on Ways & Means (D-Boston). "I want to thank the Speaker, Chairs Straus and Gregoire, and our colleagues in the Senate for the hard work they put into this legislation, and for continuing to prioritize out transportation system". 

"Public transportation is a public good. The $350 million investment is among the largest Chapter 90 bond bills to date and represents the Legislature's commitment to safe roads, reliable bridges, and modernized transit infrastructure," said Senate Transportation Committee Chair Joe Boncore (D-Winthrop).  "In addition to funding shovel-ready projects, the Chapter 90 bond bill makes statewide investments support public transit, address traffic congestion, and advance electric vehicle infrastructure and fleets." 

"This legislation recognizes that in addition to the backlog of local roads in need of repair, there is an unmet need  for local projects that benefit all modes of transportation, and I am pleased that the legislature was able to provide municipal assistance for road work and expanded funding for towns and cities to advance public transit and reduce congestion," said Rep. Bill Straus (D-Mattapoisett), House chair of the Joint Committee on Transportation. 

"The funding provided through this critical legislation allows our cities and towns the ability to move forward on the necessary repairs and improvements to keep our roads, bridges and infrastructure safe for the residents of our communities," said Representative Gregoire, co-Chair of the Joint Committee on Bonding, Capital Expenditures and State Assets . "I am grateful to Speaker Mariano for the opportunity to play a small part in its passage."

"Today's final enactment of $350 million in Chapter 90 bond authorizations is a smart investment for the Commonwealth," said Senator Paul R. Feeney (D-Foxborough), the Senate Chair of the Joint Committee on Bonding, Capital Expenditures and State Assets. "There is no question our local infrastructure is in dire need of repairs and upgrades. As we recover from the pandemic and businesses and offices re-open, more people are hitting the roads and commuting once again. This comprehensive investment in our transportation infrastructure will put people to work and allow our city and town officials to forge ahead with the critical projects necessary to keep our communities moving along safely."

"The members of the Senate Republican Caucus are pleased to join with our colleagues in passing Chapter 90 legislation that will provide valuable resources to our cities and towns to construct and maintain the roads and bridges all of us depend on every day. Road paving, bridge construction and repair, and similar projects are important to our economy, our safety, and our quality of life, but their costs can be a major challenge for municipal budgets," said Senate Minority Leader Bruce Tarr (R- Gloucester). "The spending authorizations contained in this bill will provide the resources and support needed urgently to respond to that challenge and make those projects possible this year."

"The long-standing state-municipal partnership established under the Chapter 90 program is critical to helping cities and towns meet their transportation infrastructure needs. Today's agreement continues the House and Senate's ongoing commitment to support this important road and bridge program. Combined with the funding increases for targeted municipal transit-related grants, this bond bill will allow cities and towns to focus on addressing some of their most critical transportation needs," stated House Minority Leader Brad Jones (R-North Reading).

The bill includes the following components:

  • $200 million in chapter 90 funding for cities and towns for projects to maintain, improve, and repair roadways, bridges, sidewalks, and bikeways.
  • $25 million for the Municipal Small Bridge Program to support replacement or preservation of structurally deficient local bridges critical to local communities and not eligible for existing federal aid programs.
  • $25 million for the Local Bottleneck Program to address localized traffic bottlenecks and invest in infrastructure to reduce congestion, improve traffic flow, and reduce idling and greenhouse gas emissions.
  • $25 million for Electric Vehicle (EV) infrastructure to support municipalities and regional transit authorities in their efforts to install EV infrastructure and purchase EVs and zero-emission vehicles. 
  • $25 million for Transit-Supportive Infrastructure to create dedicated bus lanes, enhance bus stops and train stations, support passenger safety, upgrade technology and modernize infrastructure to meet demand and increase frequency of public transit services, and improve access to public transit.
  • $25 million for Bus Prioritization and Enhancement Projects to support municipalities in their efforts to create bus rapid transit lanes, construct catenary wires for electric trolley buses, purchase equipment for transit signal prioritization, and make improvements at bus stations and stops.
  • $25 million for Enhancements at Transit and Commuter Rail Stations to support municipalities in their efforts to construct parking lots and structures, drop-off and pick-up zones, electric vehicle charging stations, park-and-ride locations, bicycle parking or bicycle cages, and accommodations for micro-mobility devices.

The bill also includes language clarifying that transportation infrastructure projects are an allowable use of American Rescue Plan Act funds, consistent with U.S. Treasury guidelines. Having been passed by the House and Senate, the legislation now goes to Governor Baker for his signature.