Showing posts with label historical commission. Show all posts
Showing posts with label historical commission. Show all posts

Thursday, May 20, 2021

FM #545 - Community Preservation Committee Mtg - 05/18/21 (audio)

FM #545 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 545 in the series. 

This session of the radio show shares the Community Preservation Committee meeting held Tuesday, May 18, 2021


The meeting was conducted in a hybrid format: the Committee members were in the Council Chambers, other members joined the public via conference bridge, all to adhere to the ‘social distancing’ requirements of this pandemic period.


Links to the key topics covered here are included in the show notes. The recording runs about 45 minutes, so let’s listen to the Community Preservation Committee meeting held Tuesday, May 18. Audio file = https://player.captivate.fm/episode/33ee06e9-bb5d-4547-a818-de42694a4c65



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Meeting agenda -> 

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif6896/f/agendas/cpc_agenda_for_may_18_2021.pdf


Recreation presentation doc

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif6896/f/agendas/community_preservation_committee_2021_rec.pdf 


Recap of the meeting ->

https://www.franklinmatters.org/2021/05/community-preservation-committee_19.html 


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We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial.  


This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.

 

How can you help?

  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors

  • If you don't like something here, please let me know


Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.


For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/ or www.franklin.news/

If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com


The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.


I hope you enjoy!

------------------


You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"


Rec Director Ryan Jette presenting to the CPC
Rec Director Ryan Jette presenting to the CPC


Tuesday, July 14, 2020

"French Neutrals" - local interest in the French and Indian War - July 20

The Bellingham Historical Commission in partnership with the Bellingham Library will delve into the story of the "French Neutrals" who were relocated to Bellingham and other nearby towns during the French and Indian War (1754 – 1763).

The free presentation, which will be hosted on Zoom, will feature the Bellingham Historical Commission's Vice Chair Steve Joanis and his wife Bronya. The two will, in costume, relate the tale of the Robeshaw and Amerault families - Nova Scotians who were relocated to Wrentham and Bellingham in the late 1750s because the British regarded French speaking Acadians as potential adversaries.

The presentation will use a mix of the historical facts, original documents, and "likely suppositions" to recreate the story of Joseph Robeshaw's life. Joseph was born here as a captive, but stayed to serve in the militia as a citizen soldier during the American revolution.

This is a Zoom event on July 20 from 7:00 to 8:00 PMFollow the Facebook event for updates:  https://www.facebook.com/events/268935604314925/


"French Neutrals" - local interest in the French and Indian War
"French Neutrals" - local interest in the French and Indian War

Thursday, July 2, 2020

"French Neutrals" - local interest in the French and Indian War (a virtual Zoom event)

The Bellingham Historical Commission in partnership with the Bellingham Library will delve into the story of the "French Neutrals" who were relocated to Bellingham and other nearby towns during the French and Indian War (1754 – 1763).

The free presentation, which will be hosted on Zoom, will feature the Bellingham Historical Commission's Vice Chair Steve Joanis and his wife Bronya. The two will, in costume, relate the tale of the Robeshaw and Amerault families - Nova Scotians who were relocated to Wrentham and Bellingham in the late 1750s because the British regarded French speaking Acadians as potential adversaries.

The presentation will use a mix of the historical facts, original documents, and "likely suppositions" to recreate the story of Joseph Robeshaw's life. Joseph was born here as a captive, but stayed to serve in the militia as a citizen soldier during the American revolution.


This is a Zoom event on July 20 from 7:00 to 8:00 PMFollow the Facebook event for updates:  https://www.facebook.com/events/268935604314925/


"French Neutrals" - local interest in the French and Indian War
"French Neutrals" - local interest in the French and Indian War

Saturday, June 20, 2020

Franklin Historical Museum: COVID-19 Archive Project Survey

The Historical Museum is conducting a survey on what we are doing during this pandemic.
"As you well know, we are currently living through an event which will become a dash on historical timelines in future classrooms around the world. It will be a date memorized by history majors and a subject studied by researchers, scientists, and anthropologists alike as they work to understand what happened - how the spread occurred, what our response was, and how people across the globe pulled together to fight, to survive, and to find moments of joy in otherwise uncertain times.

The COVID-19 outbreak has challenged us all in ways we did not know were possible. Many of us have had to endure the unthinkable from losing jobs and suddenly becoming a homeschool teacher to worrying if it’s safe to take a walk down the street. But, it has also sparked some extraordinary and astonishing stories about the human spirit. Neighbors are helping neighbors attain food and toilet paper. Family bonds are growing stronger through video calls and virtual game nights. And, manufacturing companies are finding ways to change gears and produce much-needed medical supplies.

Now is an important time to think about how history is preserved and how what we choose to save will determine how we will be seen by posterity. With this in mind, the Franklin Historical Museum asks that you consider sharing your COVID-19 stories with us. What has quarantine been like? Are you home alone or with family members? What have you done to stay connected to friends and family outside of your household? What have you done to stay entertained? Did you binge watch tv shows and movies? Did you learn a new skill? What were your favorite moments, your most challenging moments? What do you want people to take away from this moment in history?

Stories can be shared using this form and/or by tagging us on social media #franklinstayshome."

Here is the link: https://forms.gle/3ztGoasvjGVz8RXy9

--
Rebecca Finnigan
Archivist
Town of Franklin
80 West Central Street
Franklin, MA 02038
rfinnigan@franklinma.gov


Franklin HIstorical Museum: COVID-19 Archive Project Survey
Franklin Historical Museum: COVID-19 Archive Project Survey

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

"We quickly realized the collection was much more than we had originally hoped for"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"What goes around comes around.

That is certainly the case with a collection of historic images that originated in Franklin, left Franklin, and have now returned to Franklin, giving new meaning to the phrase and leaving local historians elated.

The Franklin Historical Commission has acquired what they are describing as an historical treasure trove -- more than 600 photographic negatives on glass plates, in addition to printed photos, recording scenes of everyday life in the town around the turn of the last century.

The images were among close to 1,000 glass plate negatives that were put up for auction by Coyle’s Auction Inc. of Medway, which also included images captured in Oak Bluffs, Marstons Mills, Plainville, Wrentham, Sheldonville, Medway and Bellingham. The Franklin images comprised the bulk of the items put up for auction."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20200224/treasured-trove-franklin-historians-acquire-hundreds-of-antique-town-images/1

"the glass negatives will be carefully cataloged, scanned and digitized for archival protection and to make them more widely available"
"the glass negatives will be carefully cataloged, scanned and digitized for archival protection and to make them more widely available"

Sunday, August 4, 2019

Are they calling your name? - 7 Committee and Board vacancies waiting to be filled

While some folks are going to take out papers to run for election to one of the committees or boards that are elected, there are other volunteer spots available on committees or boards that are appointed.

When I checked Saturday morning, there were 7 spots open:

  • BOARD OF REGISTRARS (1 vacancies)
  • CULTURAL DISTRICT COMMITTEE (1 vacancies)
  • Design Review Commission (1 vacancies)
  • Finance Committee (2 vacancies)
  • Franklin Cultural Council (2 vacancies)
  • Historical Commission (1 vacancies)
Do you have an interest and talent in one of these areas?

Prepare a cover letter and resume and you can submit online or stop by the Town Administrator's office to do so in person.

The open positions are found online  https://franklinmaboards.vt-s.net/vt.php

Click on the board or committee name and a window will also to allow for an online application.

Committee - Board vacancies waiting to be filled -Are they calling your name?
Committee - Board vacancies waiting to be filled -Are they calling your name?


Saturday, April 20, 2019

Discussion scheduled on future of Old South Meeting Church - Apr 24

A discussion is scheduled at 7:10 PM during the April 24 Town Council meeting regarding the Old South Meeting Church on Washington St. The memo to neighborhood residents from Town Administrator Jeff Nutting is shown here:
"As are well aware the Meeting House at 762 Washington Street has been vacant for a long time. The Town Council will have a discussion on the potential future use of the property at their meeting on April 24, 2019. We would very much like to hear from you on this matter. The intent the meeting is to listen to ideas, suggestions and concerns prior to the Town Council considering any future action on the matter. 
Prior to the meeting the church will be open for viewing 5:00-6:15 PM on April 24, 2019. The meeting to discuss the matter will be held immediately after at 7: 10 PM in the Town Council Chambers. 
The Town did have an architect review the building in 2015 and estimated at the time the cost for the Town (subject to all public bid laws) to bring the building into compliance with all building, wiring, plumbing, handicap accessibility etc. codes would be about $500,000. Since then building construction prices have risen so the cost will be higher. 
The full report can be found at 
https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/franklinma/files/uploads/old_south_meeting_house_on_washington_street_1.pdf
Past discussions with the Historical Commission and others did not lead to any practical suggested reuse given the cost to renovate the building, limited parking, site lines looking west on Washington Street and the limited use the building has had over the years relative to peace and.  
The building does not meet current zoning requirements for residential or commercial use. The current zoning is RRI that requires 200 feet of frontage and 40,000 square feet of land. The only allowed use without a variance from the Zoning Board of Appeals would be for religious or educational use. 
The Town did construct a water booster station in the rear of the property (funds provided from the developer of Oak Hill Condo 's) and will maintain the station no matter what decision is made about the future of the Church. 
We would appreciate your attendance and comments. Please pass this information along to others who may be interested in this matter. I am happen to answer any questions you may have prior to the meeting."


The letter can also be found online
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0wjbnXDBhczV2V6Vkh6NnJWLXM3SHYxeFBySTdNOXV1NUpB/view?usp=sharing

And viewed here




South Meeting House
Old South Meeting House, Washington St

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Franklin Annual Report - 2018: Historical Commission

The Franklin Historical Commission is a volunteer committee appointed by the Town Administrator and ratified by the Town Council. We are dedicated to maintaining, staffing, and operating the Franklin Historical Museum, and to preserving the historical assets of the Town of Franklin. Meetings are held the 2nd Tuesday of the month at 6:30 PM at the museum and are open to the public.

We have up to 7 full-time members with voting privileges along with non-voting associate members.

Members

Mary Olsson, Chair
Phyllis Malcolm,Treasurer
Jeremy Ball, Recording Secretary
Colette Ferguson
Bob Percy
Paul Pisani
Richard Remillard

Associate Members

Mary O'Neill
Kai Olsson

Overview
The Franklin Historical Museum has been in our present location for 8 years now. The museum occupies the old Town Hall Building at 80 West Central Street, just a half block before the fire station, and across the street from the new Horace Mann Square. We continue to work to engage the community and area residents so they rely on the
museum and find it a place to explore and celebrate the Town's heritage, achievements, and unique place in history.

Mission Statement
The Franklin Historical Museum is a center for community engagement, committed to facilitating the exploration of Franklin through a local, regional, and national lens, to a multi-generational audience.

WE ARE OPEN: Saturdays 10AM to 1PM; Sundays 1PM to 4PM; Thursdays 5PM to 8PM. During winter months (beginning of December thru end of March) we are closed on Thursdays.

Museum Hosts
Commission members and volunteers keep the museum open by giving of their time to host at the Museum during our open hours. Our hosts answer questions and share their knowledge of Franklin’s history. (Hosting is also a great way to learn more!) To become a host volunteer, contact any member of the commission.

Some of our events this year:

Town of Franklin Birthday Party
On March 3rd we celebrated the founding of the town by inviting local town residents who share the same birthday with the town. Those birthday celebrants attending were entered into a drawing for a $100 ‘picture of Ben’. And, as with any birthday celebration, cake was served.

Second Sunday Speaker Series
This year we are pleased to announce the founding of our Second Sunday speaker events at the Museum. On the second Sunday of each month, at 1PM, local and regional speakers share their knowledge and insight on various historical and cultural topics.

Appraisal Day
Antiques expert Nancy Wyman hosted another interesting appraisal session at the Museum in April. People discovered more about their ‘finds,’ and learned of their approximate market value.

Art Week
As part of this town-wide celebration, Dennis Ferguson performed on the Museum’s locally manufactured Trowbridge piano. Also performing were the Prolatio Singers, under the direction of Dr. Ferguson. Musician and artist Kai Olsson performed and displayed his paintings.

Little League Display
To recognize the founding of Franklin Youth Baseball in 1953, an informative and interesting display by Elaine Costello was presented in April. Some of the original players attended a kick-off reception in their honor.

Hi-definition Photographs
We are continuing to add to and refine our permanent collection of historic photographs on our iC4K Display Screen, invented and produced by Almont Green Studios of Medway. This display screen allows visitors to view and browse through large format digitized photographs of Franklin’s past.

Wedding Dress Display and Speakers
Returning this year, June through August, was another exquisite wedding dress display, the product of many volunteer hours. To complement the display were two separate event presentations on wedding dresses. The public was invited to submit their wedding photos to be scanned and added to our permanent collection.

Annual Events of the Downtown Partnership
The Commission enjoys being part in the annual events planned by the Downtown Partnership which include the Strawberry Festival, the Harvest Festival, and the Holiday Stroll. The Holiday Stroll is always a fun evening hosted by Mrs. Claus who reads to many wide eyed children.

Social Media
The Museum’s presence in social media continues to grow. Come join the discussion on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FHM02038/).

Wall Calendars
In 2018 we produced calendars of old Franklin photographs and key dates. We plan to produce another for 2019, to be available at the Museum for a nominal fee.

School Participation
We encourage elementary, middle, and high school student visits to the museum to learn about Franklin throughout the course of the year. So many stories to tell! Learning about our town’s history is a wonderful gateway to history as a whole. Teachers are encouraged to contact us to make arrangements to bring their class in for a visit and hosted tour.

Demolition Requests
Under the demolition bylaw passed by the Town Council, the Historical Commission reviews any demolition request of a property built in 1930 or before. We make every attempt to encourage the preservation of any building of historical significance. We have the option to delay the demolition of a building for up to a year so that suitable alternatives can be considered.

This year, the following properties were approved for demolition:

  • 300 W. Central St. 1880
  • 70 E. Central St. 1900

This speaks to the ongoing issue of the disappearance of the Town’s historical assets.

You can read the full Annual Report for 2018 online
https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/franklinma/files/uploads/franklin_2018_town_report.pdf

The archive of prior year annual reports
https://www.franklinma.gov/town-clerk/pages/annual-reports

exterior siding work is nearing completion, next up will be work to repair the cupola
exterior siding work is nearing completion, next up will be work to repair the cupola

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

"When Terrorism Struck Franklin - Feb 28, 1919" (audio)

If you missed the Second Sunday Speaker Series at the Franklin Historical Museum on Sunday, Jan 13, 2019, you can review the slide deck here and while listening to the audio recording below.

Franklin historian, Alan Earls is introduced by Mary Olsson, Franklin Historical Museum.


FM #157
This internet radio show or podcast is number 157 in the series for Franklin Matters.

This recording shares the Second Sunday Speaker Series presentation given on Sunday, Jan 13, 2019.

Franklin historian Alan Earls talks on "When Terrorism Struck Franklin: February 28, 1919"
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2019/01/second-sunday-speaker-series-when.html

The show notes on Franklin Matters will also include the presentation document so you can follow along.

The total recording presentation and the follow up Question and Answer period runs about 55 minutes. Without further ado, here is the audio recording.

Mary Olsson introduces Alan Earls
Mary Olsson introduces Alan Earls

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______________

This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but I can't do it alone. I can always use your help.

How can you help?

In particular, if you have an interest in real estate, zoning or construction, I would like someone to follow the Planning Board, Zoning Board of Appeals, and Conservation Commission meetings. I’ll provide the guidance on note taking and sharing. You need to bring an inquisitive and open mind and willingness to learn and share.

Overall:
  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors
  • If you don't like this, please let me know

Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements.
Thank you for listening.

For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/
If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com

The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana" c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.

I hope you enjoy!

------------------

You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes = search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"


subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters on iTunes
subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters on iTunes

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

"it’s referred to as the Fisher House"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"In 1750, in a backwoods edge of Wrentham, a house was erected. More than two centuries later, it is still standing in what is now part of Franklin. 
But the house, located on Lincoln Street, could be on the verge of potential destruction. 
The Franklin Historical Commission will hold a public hearing next week about the house’s potential demolition and its historic value to the town. The hearing takes place at 6:30 p.m. on Oct. 9 at the Franklin Historical Museum, 80 West Central St. 
Amy Roberson, who owns the house, said she had not heard about the hearing, but as a history buff, she is uneasy about the house’s possible fate. The idea of the house being demolished was news to her, but she said it isn’t surprising due to the house’s condition."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20181001/house-possibly-tied-to-early-franklin-family-subject-of-demolition-hearing

Where is the Fisher house?

Sunday, January 7, 2018

Annual Report 2017: Franklin Historical Commission

The Annual Report is compiled and published each year to be ready for voters to obtain at the November election. A PDF copy is also posted online and available for viewing our downloading. 

The following is a text representation of the printed pages 90-91 (actually 97-98 of 264)


"ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FRANKLIN HISTORICAL COMMISSION.

The Franklin Historical Commission is a volunteer committee appointed by the Town Administrator and ratified by the Town Council. We are dedicated to maintaining, staffing, and operating the Franklin Historical Museum, and to preserving the historical assets of the Town of Franklin. Meetings are held the 2nd Tuesday of the month at 6:30 PM at the museum and are open to the public.

We have up to 7 full-time Commission members with voting privileges along with non-voting associate members.

Members
Mary Olsson, Chair
Phyllis Malcolm,Treasurer
Bob Percy, Recording Secretary
Colette Ferguson
Connie Lawson
Richard Remillard
Jeremy Ball
Associate Members
Mary O'Neill 
Kai Olsson 
Alice Vendetti
Anyone interested in becoming an associate member of
the Historical Commission is encouraged to contact us.

FRANKLIN HISTORICAL MUSEUM
The Franklin Historical Museum has been in our present location for 7 years now. The museum occupies the old Town Hall Building at 80 West Central Street, just a half block before the fire station, and across the street from the new Horace Mann Square. We continue to work to engage the community and area residents so they rely on the museum and find it a place to explore and celebrate the Town's heritage, achievements, and unique place in history.

Mission Statement
The Franklin Historical Museum is a center for community engagement, committed to facilitating the exploration of Franklin through a local, regional, and national lens, to a multigenerational audience.

WE ARE OPEN:
Saturdays 10 AM to 1 PM;
Sundays 1 PM to 4 PM;
Thursdays 5 PM to 8 PM. During winter months (early December thru end of March) we are closed on Thursday evenings.

Museum Hosts
Commission members and volunteers keep the museum open by giving of their time to host at the Museum during our open hours. Our hosts answer questions and share their knowledge of Franklin’s history. To become a host volunteer, contact any member of the commission.


Events this past year:

Town of Franklin Birthday Party
On March 2nd we celebrated the founding of the town by inviting local town residents who share the same birthday with the town. Those birthday celebrants attending were entered into a drawing for a $100 ‘picture of Ben’. And, as with any birthday celebration, cake was served.

Horace Mann Day
Each year we recognize Franklin’s most famous son, Horace Mann, born May 4, 1796. Mann, known as the Father of Education, was a lawyer, statesman, abolitionist, and a great humanitarian. We are proud to celebrate his birthday each year and remember his noble accomplishments.

This year’s celebration was highlighted by the dedication of an oversized statue of Horace Mann across the street in the newly designated Horace Mann Square. Congratulations to all those who helped facilitate this great tribute to Franklin’s favorite son.

Hi-definition Photographs on display
A major addition to the Museum in 2017 was the iC4K Display Screen, invented and produced by Almont Green Studios of Medway. This display screen allows visitors to view and browse through large format digitized photographs of Franklin’s past.

Abraham Megerdichian - Metal Sculptures
Robert Megerdichian, son of former Franklin resident and metal sculptor Abraham Megerdichian loaned many of his father’s sculptures to the Museum and gave two memorable presentations on his father’s passion for producing detailed and finely crafted miniature cars, animals, musical instruments, and countless other miniature sculptures.

Wedding Dress Display and Speakers
Returning this year was another exquisite wedding dress display, the product of many volunteer hours. To complement the display were two separate event presentations on wedding dresses.

Franklin Downtown Partnership Events
The Commission enjoys being part in the annual events planned by the Downtown Partnership which include the Strawberry Stroll, October’s Harvest Festival, and the Holiday Stroll. The Holiday Stroll, in early December, is always a fun evening attended by Mrs. Claus reading to many wide eyed children.

Social Media
The Museum’s presence in social media is growing. In a typical week in February on our Facebook page there were 37 page views, 665 people reached, and 1,106 post engagements.

Wall Calendars
In 2017 we produced calendars of vintage Franklin photographs and key dates. Stop by and pick up your 2018 Franklin Calendar, available at the Museum Gift Shop for a nominal fee.

Area Historical Commissions and Societies Hosted at Franklin Museum
For a second year, the Franklin Historical Museum hosted area Historical Commissions for a meet and greet and informal discussion. It was well attended by the surrounding towns of Wrentham, Bellingham, Norfolk, Plainville, Millis, Foxborough, Medway, and Blackstone. We also enjoyed gathering at Plainville’s An Unlikely Story bookstore this year. It is always a pleasure to meet with our counterparts from neighboring towns.

School Participation
We encourage elementary, middle, and high school student visits to the museum to learn about Franklin throughout the course of the year. So many stories to tell! Learning about our town’s history is a wonderful gateway to history as a whole. Teachers are encouraged to contact us to make arrangements to bring their class in for a visit and hosted tour.

Demolition Requests
Under the demolition bylaw passed by the Town Council, the Historical Commission reviews any demolition request of a property built in 1930 or before. We make every attempt to encourage the preservation of any building of historical significance. We have the option to delay the demolition of a building for up to a year so that suitable alternatives can be considered. The following properties were approved for demolition:

  • 899 Upper Union St. 1850
  • 36 Plain St. 1810

This speaks to the ongoing issue of the disappearance of the Town’s historical assets.

Friends of the Franklin Historical Museum (FFHM)
The Friends, which is the fundraising arm of the museum, work to bring special events and programs to the museum. Donations to this organization are always welcome! Because the Friends is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization, all donations are tax deductible.

We also encourage people to donate items that pertain to the town’s history (such as artifacts, photographs, and written records) at the Museum during our regular hours of operation. These donations to the Friends are also tax deductible.

Thanks goes to members of the community who have helped enrich and deepen our understanding of the town’s history, and we look forward to working on additional projects in the future. We are grateful for your support and look forward to another exciting year!

Respectfully submitted,
The Franklin Historical Commission"

Contact us:
Email: franklinmuseum1778@gmail.com
http://www.franklinma.gov/historical-commission
webpage: http://franklinhistoricalmuseum.org/


You can find the online copy at the Town of Franklin webpage
http://www.franklinma.gov/town-clerk/pages/annual-reports

and specifically for 2017
http://www.franklinma.gov/town-clerk/files/town-annual-report-2017-revised

Annual Report 2017: Franklin Historical Commission
Annual Report 2017: Franklin Historical Commission

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Fashions of The WW II Era - Dec 10

Karen (Ren) Antonowicz of Spirits of Fashion discusses the influence of war and rationing on 1940s Fashions. Despite the restrictions there was still a distinct style and trends that developed in everyday fashion. Join us as she presents dress and style of the WWII era.


Sunday December 10, 1:15 PM

Hours of Operation: Saturday 10-1, Sunday 1-4, Thursdays 5-8. Always Free and handicap accessible

Fashions of The WW II Era - Dec 10
Fashions of The WW II Era

Find out more about the Franklin Historical Museum on the web at
http://franklinhistoricalmuseum.org/

Monday, November 20, 2017

A Remembrance of Alice Wiggin - (1878 - 1966)

Shared by Robert Percy, Franklin Historical Commission:

In 1885, two seven year old girls moved to Franklin, and lived in two newly built houses right next to each other on Crescent St. One was May Fales; the other was Alice Wiggin. They would become fast friends, and remained best friends for the rest of their lives.

Alice Wiggin taught English at Franklin High School for 42 years, starting as a young woman. She had attended Radcliffe College, one of the finest womens’ colleges in the country. By all accounts she was a talented and beloved teacher. The 1929 Franklin High School yearbook, the Oskey, was dedicated to her. In it, her students say:
She is a master of the art of teaching English literature… She is a critic capable of grasping and explaining her subject with clearness and precision by the use of short and simple words… She shows a remarkable breadth of judgment, a patience that never wearies, a quiet enthusiasm which no difficulty can distort or destroy, and great insight which can give richness to literature and new meanings to old dogmas.

This is powerful praise from her students. They go on to say:
As a friend, she loves her pupils for what they are, radiating to them by precept, sympathy and example, what she would have them be. Her creed — “Be a friend; the rest will follow.”
We are here today because of something that happened much earlier. In 1911, an eight year old girl and her four younger siblings were abandoned at South Station in Boston by their mother. This little girl was Sophie Aronofsky, who later came to live with a foster family in Franklin. At first, the soft-spoken Sophie was a student in Alice Wiggin’s English class. 

Because she showed such great promise as a student and as a human being, Alice took a great interest in her, and she came to live at Alice’s house. Alice encouraged Sophie to apply to Radcliffe College, which she attended from 1919 to 1923. Inspired by Alice’s example, Sophie went on to become a high school teacher in Duxbury and Quincy, and teacher of French, Latin, and English in California.

We are honored to have Sophie’s family here today. Sophie’s daughter Sarita Jo Mattson has powerful and loving memories of traveling from California to Massachusetts to stay with Alice multiple times while her mother was battling

cancer: once in 1948 when she was eight, for an entire year in 1952 when she was 12, and again at age 16 in 1956. Alice would also visit Sophie and family in San Diego several times while Sophie was battling cancer there.

Alice had a brilliant and active mind, but she was not the best housekeeper. Items were piled high everywhere, but visitors and neighbors and guests of all kind were always welcome.

In the words of Sarita Jo Mattson, Alice’s house was sort of a mini retirement home. Living with her was another Franklin High School teacher named Doc Fraser. Another was Frank Weaver, a visually impaired piano tuner, along with his wife Florence. The couple lived with Alice for the remainder of their lives. Alice also cared for two other foster daughters: Alice Dutton and Elizabeth Stewart Kubli, and for Sophie’s brother Samuel and sister Lil.

In later life, Alice would read new books for the Town Library and advised them on what to buy. Alice was a good cook and enjoyed cooking and eating. She helped people in need by cooking for them and delivering meals to their houses. She drove neighbors and friends to doctors’ appointments.

Alice passed away from a heart attack in 1966 at the age of 88. The whereabouts of her remains was a mystery for some time. We are honored and humbled that she rests here, in the place she cared so much about, in the town she has done so much for.

Her lifelong friend May lived to be 100, and rests here with her husband, brother… and her dear friend Alice. In this place of remembrance, their close bonds remain.


Union Street Cemetery 
Franklin, MA 
November 18, 2017


A Remembrance of Alice Wiggin - (1878 - 1966)
A Remembrance of Alice Wiggin - (1878 - 1966)

Mary Olsson before the unveiling
Mary Olsson before the unveiling

those who gathered pose for a photo
those who gathered pose for a photo





Alice Wiggin Recognition - 11/18/17


Saturday, November 12, 2016

Franklin Historic Commission to host veterans

The Franklin Historic Commission will host local Franklin veterans on Saturday morning, November 12 from 9:00-10:00AM at the Museum.

State Rep Jeff Roy, Veterans Representative Dale Kurtz, Town Officials and Members of the Town Council will be in attendance to honor the Veterans.

A light breakfast of pastries, donuts, coffee and juices will be served.

The commission hopes that this will be the first annual breakfast for the Veterans.

Franklin Historical Museum, 80 West Central St
Franklin Historical Museum, 80 West Central St 

Thursday, October 6, 2016

"It's a rare find in such condition"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"The Town Council heard on Wednesday evening a report on an extensive categorization and reorganization project that took place at the town historical museum during the summer. 
Historical Commission member Mary Olsson, as well as Allison Anderson, one of the two interns who worked on the project, gave a presentation to the council at its meeting. 
Anderson spoke of the conditions at the museum, noting that while there were many deficiencies, the institution has a great deal of potential."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20161005/franklin-council-hears-historical-museum-report

an exhibit about Franklin's own 3-star general is available near the entrance to the main room of the Historical Museum
an exhibit about Franklin's own 3-star general is available near the entrance to the main room of the Historical Museum

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Live reporting: Historical Commission update

H. PRESENTATIONS/DISCUSSIONS -
- Historical Commission

Mary Olsson

hired two interns for part time work at the museum
Allison Anderson, BA and working on Masters

hired to assess needs of the collection and propose suggestions
more was required than simple inventory
some items were not relevent to the collection, and not enough storage for the items that should be cared for carefully

dependent upon an inventory developed in the 1970's

collection well connected to community
dusting and cleaning needed to create a safe working environment
items exposed to potential damage
permanent and safe storage needed
volunteers do not have the knowledge or expertise to do the inventory and assessment

at least 300 post cards with fully inventory
post card printing blocks are rare and a few were found, they also have post cards made with the blocks

weight of the clothing stacked potentially damaged the items on the bottom of the piles

a rare find of a child's dress from the 1880's in good condition

high quality scans of photos make the images more readily accessible

a guide developed by one of the interns will help future volunteer work

social media is a good way to build interaction with the museum
the Instagram account was linked to Facebook and volume of interactions increased

many weaknesses are highlighted, a part time curator would be worthwhile
the project set up a framework for future work to build upon

continued investment in people and supplies are vital

The historical commission has done good work getting to this point