Showing posts with label DEP. Show all posts
Showing posts with label DEP. Show all posts

Thursday, October 29, 2020

Franklin receives $18,000 from Sustainable Materials Recovery Program (SMRP)

The Baker-Polito Administration today (Oct 28, 2020) announced $3.2 million in grant funding to 269 municipalities and regional solid waste districts through the Sustainable Materials Recovery Program (SMRP). The grants will help communities across the Commonwealth maximize their recycling, composting and waste reduction programs.
 
“Some of the most important environmental protection work happens every day in communities throughout Massachusetts through local recycling and solid waste programs,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “With this assistance, we are ensuring that local officials, residents and small business owners can continue protecting the Commonwealth’s neighborhoods and natural resources.”
 
“Under the Sustainable Materials Recovery Program, municipalities and solid waste districts are working even harder to improve recycling programs and reduce waste, which has resulted in a seven percent increase in funding over last year,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “With these grants, our administration and our local partners are making a difference in communities across the Commonwealth.”
 
Under SMRP, 227 communities qualified for the Recycling Dividends Program (RDP) and will receive payments ranging from $2,450 to $97,500. The RDP recognizes municipalities that have implemented policies and programs proven to maximize materials reuse and recycling, as well as waste reduction. Communities that earn RDP payments must reinvest the funds in their recycling programs for things such as new recycling bins or carts, public education and outreach campaigns, collection of hard-to-recycle items and the establishment of recycling programs in schools, municipal buildings and other public spaces.
 
“The Baker-Polito Administration is currently working to finalize the Commonwealth’s Solid Waste Master Plan for the next decade, which will establish aggressive goals to reduce our waste disposal and increase recycling,” said Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Kathleen Theoharides. “We are pleased to offer this assistance to help communities cycle resources back into our economy and support local businesses throughout the collection, processing and manufacturing chain.”
 
As part of this SMRP grant round, 42 municipalities that did not apply for or qualify for an RDP payment will be awarded a total of $45,250 for a Small-Scale Initiatives Grant. These population-based grants range from $500 to $2,000 each and help communities purchase modest, but critical recycling materials and outreach tools needed to sustain their existing recycling program or to facilitate new, low-cost initiatives. Each of these SMRP programs are administered by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP).
 
“These new funds give communities the opportunity to make critical investments in their recycling programs, capturing more materials that can be reused, and helping them to reduce their waste disposal costs,” said MassDEP Commissioner Martin Suuberg. “This is another example of MassDEP’s commitment to building strategic partnerships with our local communities.”
 
The RDP was rolled out in 2014 under MassDEP’s Sustainable Materials Recovery Program, which was created by the Green Communities Act of 2008. The Act requires that a portion of the proceeds from the sale of Waste Energy Certificates (WECs) be directed to recycling programs approved by MassDEP. The SMRP initiative has provided more than $41.6 million in recycling programs since 2010.
 
Twelve municipalities earned a payment of at least $50,000: Cambridge at $97,500; New Bedford at $91,000; Boston at $80,000; Springfield and Worcester at $71,500; Brockton, Lowell, Newton and Quincy earning between $60,000 and $70,000; and Brookline, Chicopee and Lynn earning between $50,000 and $60,000. Nine municipalities are first-time recipients of Recycling Dividends Program funds.

“Massachusetts’ commitment to sustainable practices is one of the reasons our quality of life is so high here,” said Senate President Karen E. Spilka (D-Ashland). “I am thrilled that so many communities in my district and across the Commonwealth have shown success in their recycling programs and will receive additional resources to continue investing in that success.”
 
“Massachusetts residents are committed to recycling and these grants will go a long way to promote and increase recycling in homes, municipal buildings and industry,” said State Senate Minority Leader Bruce Tarr (R-Gloucester). “I am delighted that communities in our area and across the state are being recognized and supported for their efforts.”

“Promoting recycling and reducing the amount of waste that ends up in landfills is critical to protecting the environment, not only today but also for future generations,” said House Minority Leader Bradley H. Jones, Jr. (R-North Reading). “The Sustainable Materials Recovery Program provides an important funding source to help communities expand their recycling and composting efforts, and I am thrilled to see that three of the towns in my district will share in the latest round of funding awards.”
 
“Increasing sustainable consumer practices and improving recycling programs are important steps in fighting climate change and bettering the health of our planet,” said State Representative Smitty Pignatelli (D-Lenox), House Chairman of the Joint Committee on the Environment, Natural Resources, and Agriculture. “The grants awarded by the Sustainable Materials Recovery Program go far in improving recycling systems at the local level, which translate into better overall results at the state level. The six communities in my district that are receiving funds through this program will be well served by the improvements these grants will facilitate.”

“To have this grant money come back to the district is great, especially due to the fact that Amesbury and Newburyport are communities that demonstrate the importance of environmental consciousness,” said State Representative James Kelcourse (R-Amesbury). “This funding will help these cities continue to lead in establishing creative, new recycling efforts, and to push forward on a path toward a more sustainable future.”
 
See a list of the 269 RDP and Small-Scale grant awards here (https://www.mass.gov/doc/list-of-2020-first-round-municipalregional-grant-awards-october-2020/download).
 
The WEC payments received by MassDEP are deposited into the SMRP Expendable Trust, which is used to fund grants, technical assistance and educational outreach to help communities, businesses and institutions increase recycling and reduce waste.
 
MassDEP is responsible for ensuring clean air and water, safe management and recycling of solid and hazardous wastes, timely cleanup of hazardous waste sites and spills and the preservation of wetlands and coastal resources. 

Franklin receives $18,000 from Sustainable Materials Recovery Program (SMRP)
Franklin receives $18,000 from Sustainable Materials Recovery Program (SMRP)


Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Town of Franklin, MA: status moves to Level 3- Critical Drought

Franklin is included in the updated Level 3- Critical Drought region of Massachusetts. 
"Due to five months of below normal rainfall, Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Secretary Kathleen Theoharides today declared a Level 3 – Critical Drought in the Southeast Region of the Commonwealth. The other six regions across the state — the Western, Connecticut River Valley, Central, Northeast, Cape Cod, and Islands regions— remain at a Level 2 – Significant Drought, unchanged from last month’s declaration. Responding to increasingly severe drought conditions in some of the Commonwealth’s river basins, Secretary Theoharides also declared a Level 3 – Critical Drought in the Charles River and Millers River watersheds."
 
Find the press release and additional information here https://t.co/ePS4ROsLcx  
 
Shared from Twitter:
 
Available on Town of Franklin page: 
Town of Franklin, MA: status moves to Level 3- Critical Drought
Town of Franklin, MA: status moves to Level 3- Critical Drought

Tuesday, October 13, 2020

495/MetroWest Partnership: New PFAS Drinking Water Standard: Presentation and Q&A with MassDEP

The 495/MetroWest Partnership will host representatives from the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for a presentation regarding the Commonwealth's new PFAS drinking water standard, to be followed by a Question & Answer period.

Presenters will include:

  • Kathleen M. Baskin, P.E., Assistant Commissioner, Bureau of Water Resources
  • Damon Guterman, Senior Analyst, Drinking Water Program

This event will take place virtually via Zoom on Wednesday, October 21st, at 8:30 AM.  Click here to register:   https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ViP3UiofT4KWbJONfsmp4w

Background

In January 2019, DEP announced its intention to initiate the process to develop a drinking water standard, known as a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL), for a group of Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS). 

On December 27th, 2019, proposed revisions to the drinking water regulations were published in the Massachusetts Register, marking the start of the formal public comment period.  

The revised PFAS regulation was published on October 2nd, 2020:


Click here to access a redlined version, highlighting changes implemented since the draft regulations were released in 2019

For more background information regarding DEP's development of a PFAS drinking water standard, click here  https://www.mass.gov/lists/development-of-a-pfas-drinking-water-standard-mcl

495/MetroWest Partnership: New PFAS Drinking Water Standard: Presentation and Q&A with MassDEP
495/MetroWest Partnership: New PFAS Drinking Water Standard: Presentation and Q&A with MassDEP



In the News: "A Millis drinking water source tested positive for PFAS"

From the Milford Daily News, an article of interest for Franklin: 

"The D’Angelis Water Treatment plant is offline after the town found elevated levels of a group of state-regulated, man-made chemicals in its drinking water.

The chemicals - called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, regularly abbreviated to PFAS - are stain- and water-resistant, and used to coat everything from clothing and furniture to food packaging and non-stick cooking surfaces.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the chemical may cause a wide variety of health problems, from increased risk of kidney or testicular cancer to high blood pressure and pre-eclampsia in pregnant women. Studies are preliminary.

Millis residents should have received a booklet in the mail Friday, explaining when the testing took place and what the town has done. The booklet emphasizes that the town is not in violation of the state’s drinking water regulations."

Friday, October 9, 2020

MA sets PFAS limits for drinking water

Via the Mass Municipal Association (MMA) which reports

"The Baker-Polito administration on Sept. 24 announced final regulations establishing a maximum contaminant level for PFAS compounds detected in drinking water.

The enforceable standards for public drinking water systems impacted by per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) – limited to 20 parts per trillion for the sum of six compounds – are largely aligned with the draft regulations the administration filed last December, on which the MMA commented.

PFAS, known as “forever chemicals,” are a class of manmade chemical compounds considered hazardous to public and environmental health. PFAS have been used since the 1950s in the manufacture of stain-resistant, water-resistant, and non-stick coatings and common consumer products such as food packaging, outdoor clothing, carpets, leather goods, ski and snowboard waxes, and more. The chemicals are also found in firefighting foam and other fire retardants, and have been detected in water and soil sources at or near several military bases and airports in Massachusetts.

The new regulations require public water suppliers to test for the six compounds, called PFAS6, and to take remedial actions when amounts exceed the limit. According to the administration, using the sum of six compounds provides for a higher degree of protection against the harmful effects of the chemicals."

Continue reading the article online  https://www.mma.org/state-establishes-pfas-limits-for-drinking-water-provides-grants/

MMA comments on proposed regulations https://www.mma.org/advocacy/mma-submits-comments-on-draft-pfas-regulations-warning-of-exorbitant-costs/

MA sets PFAS limits for drinking water
MA sets PFAS limits for drinking water



Saturday, January 25, 2020

“Everyone’s really exposed to a toxic soup of these PFAS chemicals”

While the MA DEP is making the rounds seeking public input on proposed regulations, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has come out with a report showing the problem might be more than estimated.
"The contamination of US drinking water with manmade “forever chemicals” is far worse than previously estimated with some of the highest levels found in Miami, Philadelphia and New Orleans, said a report on Wednesday by an environmental watchdog group. 
The chemicals, resistant to breaking down in the environment, are known as perfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. Some have been linked to cancers, liver damage, low birth weight and other health problems. 
The findings here by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) show the group’s previous estimate in 2018, based on unpublished US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data, that 110 million Americans may be contaminated with PFAS, could be far too low."
Continue reading the article online 
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jan/22/us-drinking-water-contamination-forever-chemicals-pfas

The link to the EWG report  https://www.ewg.org/research/national-pfas-testing/

Video link = https://youtu.be/R_D0tbKQGis




Saturday, January 4, 2020

Franklin Issue on the 2020 'Watch List': new PFAS regulations from MA DEP

As we enter 2020, there are several issue that I will be keeping an eye out for. In no particular priority order, this first one carries over from 2019. The proposed MA DEP regulations are open for review. Public hearings are scheduled throughout the State during January to review the proposed regulations. You can find the schedule at the end of the MMA article linked to and quoted below. Alternatively:
"Public comments on the draft regulations will be accepted by email to program.director-dwp@mass.gov through Feb. 28"

From the Mass Municipal Association (MMA):
"On Dec. 13, the Baker-Polito administration and the Department of Environmental Protection announced their intent to file two regulations related to PFAS, a class of manmade chemical compounds considered hazardous to public and environmental health. 
While many chemicals have been identified as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, the MassDEP regulations pertain to six targeted PFAS compounds. 
The first regulation, filed by MassDEP, mandates cleanup by parties found responsible for groundwater contamination of 20 parts per trillion (ppt) or more of the sum of the six PFAS compounds. The cleanup rule also establishes PFAS limits specifically for soil contamination. Massachusetts is one of only a few states that have established formal PFAS cleanup standards. 
The second regulation is a draft rule that would establish a maximum contaminant level for drinking water at the same 20 ppt of the sum of the six PFAS compounds. In a press release, the MassDEP notes that the proposed maximum contaminant level for drinking water “covers a larger subgroup of compounds than any other state and provides a greater deal of protection, particularly for sensitive subgroups.”
Continue reading the article online
https://www.mma.org/state-files-regulations-regarding-pfas-contamination/

Why?

As an update to the previously shared listing on the "turf issue":

What we know:

What we don’t know:

  • What happened to the Conservation Commission mitigation measures from when the field was first installed (in 2004?)?
  • Where was the old carpet and bags of unused infill taken?
  • What will the Federal agencies do with PFAS and the recent revelations (if anything)?

Related Links

TA Statement 12/4/19 meeting

TA Statement 10/16/19 meeting

Pantherbook article 12/11/19

bags of the acrylic coated infill ready for install at FHS in August 2017

Sunday, December 15, 2019

Pantherbook: "Toxic Turf at Beaver Pond?"

Via Pantherbook:
"Have you ever played on the field at Beaver Pond in Franklin, MA? Many kids have. Little do they know, discarded turf from the field has been decomposing in the pond’s wetlands for over two years."
Continue reading the Pantherbook article online
https://franklinpanthers.us/top-stories/2019/12/11/toxic-turf-at-beaver-pond/

The Pantherbook posting was prescient as the Boston Globe published this:
"Amid growing concerns about toxic chemicals in the water supply, state regulators Friday announced significant new limits on the human-made compounds in drinking water and approved new requirements ordering polluters to clean up contaminated soil and ground water. 
The long-awaited rules come as environmental officials acknowledge that the per- and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals, known as PFAS, have been found in a growing number of communities across the state. 
The chemicals, which have been linked to cancer, low infant birth weights, and a range of diseases, have been found so far in 28 of 37 municipal water systems that have provided test results to the state Department of Environmental Protection, officials said this week. Of those, 12 found that the amounts exceed the proposed standards for drinking water."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/12/13/massachusetts-issues-new-standards-for-forever-chemicals-water-supply/dz25i9Sk92QfiDl5TeSJFL/story.html

And as an update to the previously shared listing on the "turf issue":

What we know:


What we don’t know:


  • What happened to the Conservation Commission mitigation measures from when the field was first installed (in 2004?)?
  • Where was the old carpet and bags of unused infill taken?
  • What will the Federal agencies do with PFAS and the recent revelations (if anything)?


bags of the acrylic coated infill ready for install at FHS in August 2017
new turf carpet being installed at Beaver St field in 2017
new turf carpet being installed at Beaver St field in August 2017

Thursday, October 10, 2019

“We will work with DEP to resolve the matter”

From the Boston Globe, an article on Franklin and PFAS.
"For two years, an abandoned pile of artificial turf had decomposed on a bluff here, a few feet above wetlands that are part of the suburb’s drinking water supply. Nearby, ripped bags with the infill of the turf, tiny pellets of shredded tires, littered the embankment.

Public health advocates have long raised alarms about artificial turf pellets, which simulate the give of natural grass but have been shown to contain benzene, cadmium, and other known carcinogens. Now, for the first time, a new series of tests has found that the blades, and their plastic backing, may also contain toxic chemicals.

The test results showed that the turf contained elevated levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals known as PFAS, which have been linked to kidney cancer, low infant birth weights, and a range of diseases. The findings have raised concerns about the safety of millions of square feet of artificial turf installed in recent years on public fields and playgrounds across the country.

“This is huge. It’s the first time that PFAS chemistry used in plastic production has been found in finished consumer products,” said Jeff Gearhart, research director of the Ecology Center, a nonprofit environmental research group based in Michigan that tested the turf. “This finding is maybe the tip of the iceberg. We suspect these PFAS chemicals may be found in other plastic building and consumer products.”
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2019/10/09/toxic-chemicals-found-blades-artificial-turf/1mlVxXjzCAqRahwgXtfy6K/story.html

Kyla Bennett (left) and Tracy Stewart of Medway looked over a pile of turf in Franklin.DAVID L RYAN/GLOBE STAFF/GLOBE STAFF
Kyla Bennett (left) and Tracy Stewart of Medway looked over a pile of turf in Franklin.DAVID L RYAN/GLOBE STAFF/GLOBE STAFF
For more info on PFAS from the EPA  https://www.epa.gov/pfas

Download your copy of the PFAS Infographic here
https://drive.google.com/file/d/11t0xrG8FCBg4-Cc2imMiTdqsPfb_REEx/view?usp=sharing

or directly from the EPA
https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2018-03/documents/pfasv15_2pg_0.pdf



Sunday, September 29, 2019

"we’re trying to both build some strategies and add some new strategies"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"State environmental officials on Friday rolled out a draft plan that calls for Massachusetts to reduce its solid waste disposal by 1.7 million tons by 2030, in part by targeting food waste, textiles and construction materials.

The Department of Environmental Protection will accept public comment on its draft 2020-2030 Solid Waste Master Plan through Dec. 6, and has a series of hearings on it planned throughout the fall.

With the state on track to fall short of its 2020 waste reduction goal - the current master plan called for a 30% reduction from 6.55 million tons in 2008 to 4.55 million tons in 2020 - the new draft sets “some very aggressive goals” backed up by a “really robust and multi-pronged strategy,” said deputy DEP commissioner Stephanie Cooper.

“We are redoubling our efforts,” Cooper said. “Part of what has affected the progress to date has been a strong economy, which sort of cuts against waste reduction generally.”

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190929/state-rolls-out-plan-to-reduce-solid-waste

  • More info on the MassDEP Solid Waste Master Plan
https://www.mass.gov/guides/solid-waste-master-plan

  • The draft 2020-2030 Solid Waste Master Plan
https://www.mass.gov/doc/draft-2030-solid-waste-master-plan/download

  • The Presentation document for the draft Master Plan
https://www.mass.gov/doc/presentation-review-of-draft-2030-solid-waste-master-plan/download


MassDEP has scheduled the following public hearings:
  • Wednesday, October 30, 2019 at 5 p.m. at the MassDEP Central Regional Office, 8 New Bond Street, Worcester;
  • Wednesday, November 6, 2019 at 5 p.m. at the MassDEP Northeast Regional Office, 205B Lowell Street, Wilmington;
  • Thursday, November 7, 2019 at 10 a.m. at the MassDEP Headquarters Office, 1 Winter Street, Boston;
  • Tuesday, November 12, 2019 at 5 p.m. at the Springfield City Library, Sixteen Acres Branch, 1187 Parker Street, Springfield; and
  • Tuesday, November 19, 2019 at 5 p.m. at the MassDEP Southeast Regional Office, 20 Riverside Drive, Lakeville.
 
 
MassDEP Solid Waste Master Plan
MassDEP Solid Waste Master Plan

Thursday, June 6, 2019

Mandatory Water Conservation Measures are in effect as of June 3, 2019

MANDATORY WATER CONSERVATION MEASURES
ARE IN EFFECT STARTING MONDAY JUNE 3, 2019
AUTOMATIC LAWN IRRIGATION IS RESTRICTED 
TO ONE DAY PER WEEK ON TRASH DAY
  • No lawn watering between the hours of 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM.
  • No holiday delays for watering.
  • No lawn watering is permitted on other days of the week.
  • Hand watering of lawn and landscape is permitted anytime. 
The summer Water Conservation Measures are needed to limit the daily demand on the water system in order to ensure that adequate water is available to meet the public health and safety needs of the Town. This measure is necessary to maintain the water levels in the tanks for fire protection and normal consumption.  

During the summer months, the Town experiences excessively high demands for water due to lawn watering. There have been 24-hour periods during which water consumption has been more than twice our average daily water usage for the year. Because of the tremendous increase in the demand for water and State restrictions on the amount of water that can be pumped daily, the Town of Franklin must place mandatory water conservation measures in effect for lawn watering during the summer months.

A total of 1-inch of water once per week from rain and watering promotes the healthiest lawns.  Non-compliance with these regulations could adversely affect public health and safety. Violators are subject to fines up to $200.           

Private irrigation wells are not required to follow the water conservation measures, however, please remember that irrigation wells are taking water from the same aquifer as Franklin's drinking water wells, so please water wisely!  If you receive a violation warning from the DPW, please call 508-520-4910 and let us know you have a private well.

Every Drop Counts
Did you know that the average American uses 100 gallons of water every day? But we can all reduce our water use by as much as 30 percent by taking a few simple steps, such as installing WaterSense labeled plumbing fixtures and using water efficiently in our yards. Did you know that the town of Franklin pumped over 990,000,000 gallons of water last year?


The Town of Franklin DPW is committed to protecting the future of our national and local water supply through water-efficient practices, products, and services. That is why we are partnering with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to bring to you WaterSense, a national program that offers people a simple way to make product choices that use less water—and perform as well or better than your existing products.  

The Town is now offering rebates for installation of high efficiency clothes washers, toilets and rain barrels!  Please click here for more information!

Why Should You Care?
  • Using water efficiently will conserve supplies for future generations.
  • Protecting and preserving the nations water supply is critical to our economic future and human health.
  • WaterSense labeled products and services perform as well as or better than their less efficient counterparts.
  • Purchasing WaterSense labeled products can help you protect the environment and help you save money on your utility bill.
Lawn Watering Tips
According to the University of Massachusetts Cooperative Extension System, lawns require only one inch of water weekly either from rain or irrigation or a combination of both.  Watering a lawn lightly on a frequent basis, rather than watering deeply once per week, encourages shallow rooting and crabgrass while making the lawn more susceptible to drought injury.  

The Town is now offering rebates for installation of rain barrels!  Please click here for more information!

Test Your WaterSense
Think you know everything there is to know about water? You can't be sure until you've played EPA's "Test Your WaterSense" online quiz! Maneuver the water-efficiency hero Hydro through water pipes and answer water-efficiency questions while avoiding water-wasting monsters such as Sogosaurus and Drainiac.


WaterSense Labeled Products
Stay tuned as WaterSense labeled products become available at a store near you! EPA maintains an online directory of labeled products that can be found here.


Learn More
What is water efficiency? You can learn more about water efficiency and water saving tips for water consumers. Learn about the benefits of water efficiency and find links to related resources and state initiated programs.

For Kids! Learn all about Water!

This is an automatic message from Town of Franklin MA. Please do not reply to this message.

Mandatory Water Conservation Measures are in effect as of June 3, 2019
Mandatory Water Conservation Measures are in effect as of June 3, 2019

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

In the News: Medway peaker plant approved; new assistant executive director at MIAA

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has issued its final air quality permits for Exelon's Medway power plant - the last set of state approvals the company sought in its project to expand the facility. 
The department's official sign-off on Exelon's Prevention of Significant Deterioration Permit and the Air Quality Plan this week comes after state officials issued a draft approval in October. 
A public hearing regarding both was held last month in Medway. 
Mark Rodgers, a company spokesman, said in a statement Tuesday the DEP's final decision marked an "important milestone" in the project."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)


"Ann Trytko, retired educator and athletic director from Hampshire Regional High School, has joined the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association as a part-time assistant executive director. 
Trytko retired at the end of last school year after a 35-year career in education that started in 1975 as a physical education teacher and concluded this past year as athletic director. She also spent several of these years coaching both middle school and high school varsity sports. 
Trytko remains an active MIAA coaches' education instructor and served several years on the MIAA tournament management and gymnastic committees, as well as the past six years as chair of gymnastics."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20161220/massachusetts-interscholastic-athletic-association-announces-addition

Thursday, June 30, 2016

In the News: School Committee meeting, MassDEP fines Franklin company

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"The School District will feature a number of new administrators this coming school year, as well as administrators who have moved on to new roles. 
The School Committee met the new administrators and bid farewell to an assistant superintendent at its meeting this week. 
Teachers and current and former committee members spoke in tribute to Assistant Superintendent Sally Winslow, who is retiring. 
Committee Chairman Kevin O'Malley said Winslow is one of the people who "did all the things necessary to keep the ship afloat all these years."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20160630/franklin-school-committee-meets-new-personnel-sees-off-retiring-assistant-superintendent


School Committee Chair Kevin O'Malley, retiring Asst Supt Sally Winslow, Superintendent Maureen Sabolinski (Committee member Cindy Douglas behind desk) photo from June 14 meeting
School Committee Chair Kevin O'Malley, retiring Asst Supt Sally Winslow, Superintendent Maureen Sabolinski (Committee member Cindy Douglas behind desk) photo from June 14 meeting



"The state Department of Environmental Protection has ordered a local business to pay a penalty for not complying with a previous order against it. 
The department announced Wednesday that a $5,453 penalty has been assessed against Jonathan White and his Hayward Street business, Classic Furniture Services. 
According to a MassDEP release, a 2014 inspection revealed that the business exceeded its status as a small generator of hazardous waste and had submitted an incomplete air quality report. The department imposed a penalty of $7,271, but an agreement with White reduced that amount by 75 percent, so long as he filed a revised air quality report about the air pollutants used and emitted at his business."


Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20160629/massdep-penalizes-franklin-business

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

"to design a smart, flexible incentive program that will continue to help advance solar development in our state."

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin
Vacating a Superior Court judge's ruling, the SJC ruled that Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) regulations do not fulfill the specific requirements of the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2008. 
The ruling requires the department to promulgate regulations "that address multiple sources of categories of sources of greenhouse gas emissions, impose a limit on emissions that may be released, limit the aggregate emissions released from each group of regulated sources or categories of sources, set emission limits for each year, and set limits that decline on an annual basis." 
"This is a historic day," Jenny Rushlow, the Conservation Law Foundation's lead attorney on the case, said in a statement. "Today our highest court declared clearly and unequivocally that our leaders can no longer sit on their hands while Massachusetts communities are put at risk from the effects of climate change. Thanks to this landmark decision, our role as a national leader in battling climate change has only been stalled but not sacrificed. Now, with action from DEP, we can get back on track and ensure that the health of our families and future generations is always a top priority."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20160517/states-top-court-sides-with-environmentalists-in-suit-over-carbon-emissions

Friday, January 8, 2016

Strategic Materials fined for violating state air pollution control and wetland protection regulations

"The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) has assessed a $17,200 penalty on Strategic Materials, Inc. of Houston, Texas, which operates a glass recycling facility at Kenwood Circle in Franklin, for violating state air pollution control and wetland protection regulations. 
State of MA DEP
State of MA DEP
Strategic Materials holds an air quality permit issued by MassDEP, which establishes emission limits and operating requirements for the glass bottle-crushing facility. Inspections conducted by MassDEP staff in 2014 identified violations of both the permit and the Wetlands Protection Act regulations."

Continue reading the press release by the State of MA DEP
http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/massdep/news/releases/franklin-recycling-facility-assessed-17200-penalty.html

In the News: senior assistance approved, recycling business fined, feedback from seniors sought

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin

The Town Council considered - and ultimately accepted - two initiatives intended to make it easier for local seniors to pay their property taxes. 
The council unanimously approved a higher tax exemption for seniors older than 70 who make less than $19,000 a year and a higher ceiling for the senior tax work-off program. 
Town Administrator Jeffrey Nutting said an increase in the state's minimum wage at the beginning of the year - from $9 to $10 an hour - allowed the town to bolster its work-off program, in which seniors volunteer at town departments in exchange for credit on their tax bills. The town is only allowed to pay seniors up to the minimum wage.
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20160107/franklin-council-approves-senior-tax-measures


A Kenwood Circle glass recycling business has been fined by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) for violations of state air quality and wetlands rules, the department announced Thursday. 
The company - Houston-based Strategic Materials, Inc. - was fined $17,200 by the department after staff discovered violations in 2014, according to the announcement.
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20160107/franklin-facility-fined-by-dep

Franklin Senior Center
Franklin Senior Center

State Rep. Jeffrey N. Roy, D-Franklin, will host a community conversation with senior citizens to discuss issues that impact their lives and to provide information on the various state programs available to them. Area seniors, their loved ones, and caregivers are invited to the event that will take place at 10:30 a.m. Jan. 15 at the Franklin Senior Center, 10 Daniel McCahill St. 
Roy’s special guest for the event is State Rep. Denise C. Garlick, D-Needham, the House Chair of the Joint Committee on Elder Affairs. Garlick, who is also a registered nurse, will speak about the $3.5 billion dollars allocated to the Executive Office of Elder Affairs and MassHealth for senior programs. Aside from MassHealth, Garlick will address other funded initiatives including homecare and nursing homes, prescription drug assistance, Council on Aging funding, protective services, elder housing and nutrition programs.
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20160107/state-rep-roy-to-host-conversation-with-franklin-medway-seniors

Thursday, March 26, 2015

"We want that site environmentally cleaned"


The Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday proposed adding a former manufacturing property on Fisher Street to its list of federal Superfund sites. 
The designation would make the polluted 18-acre property eligible for funding for the cleanup. The agency could announce the addition of the site to its National Priorities List as early as this fall. 
The Superfund law provides the EPA with the funds to clean up the sites and gives it authority to force the polluters to lead the efforts or reimburse the government for the work. There are 38 sites in Massachusetts listed on the National Priorities List.
Continue reading the article in the Milford Daily News here
http://www.milforddailynews.com/article/20150326/NEWS/150327316/1994/NEWS


This is no surprise. Franklin has been aware of the site for some time and working through the process to get it added to the listing to be eligible for government funding of the clean up required.

The EPA and MassDEP made a presentation to the Town Council July 9, 2014 in preparation for yesterday's announcement
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2014/07/live-reporting-epa-300-fisher-st.html

Where is the property located?

image of superfund site
image of superfund site

Additional details can be found here
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2014/07/300-fisher-st-map.html


The original press release can be viewed here
http://yosemite.epa.gov/opa/admpress.nsf/0/b240f4dd49480dcf85257e1200725e74?OpenDocument

Friday, February 27, 2015

In the News: Franklin receives DEP grant, DEP fines Franklin owner for improper asbestos removal


The Department of Public Works plans to use money from a state grant to curb the amount of stormwater draining into the Charles River. 
The town on Tuesday won a $119,000 grant through a state Department of Environmental Protection initiative to help cites and towns manage local water supplies. In all, DEP awarded around $755,000 in grants to 12 communities, including Medway. 
Franklin DPW Robert Cantoreggi said Thursday the grant will fund work to build a water recharge area off Jefferson Road.
Continue reading the article in the Milford Daily News: http://www.milforddailynews.com/article/20150227/NEWS/150226926/1994/NEWS#sthash.qKXmtquO.dpuf


The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) has assessed both Cohen One Realty Trust and its trustee, Harold S. Cohen of Franklin, $54,895 penalties for violating state asbestos regulations during the demolition of a Franklin residence owned by the Trust. Total fines assessed were $109,790. 
Although the Trust had the residence surveyed for asbestos-containing materials, it did not have them properly removed by a licensed asbestos contractor before demolishing the building. Also, the Trust did not notify MassDEP prior to commencing the demolition work as required by the regulations.
Continue reading the article in the Milford Daily News: http://www.milforddailynews.com/article/20150227/NEWS/150226925/1994/NEWS#sthash.JdZSrFvc.dpuf