Showing posts with label environment. Show all posts
Showing posts with label environment. Show all posts

Thursday, January 19, 2023

Intro to the Town of Franklin Conservation Agent: Breeka Li Goodlander (audio)

FM #920 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 920 in the series. 


This session of the radio show shares my introductory conversation with the Town of Franklin Conservation Agent Breeka Li Goodlander, CWS, PWS. We had our conversation via conference bridge.  


Topics for this session

  • Background on Breeka Li’s road to Franklin

  • Role of a Conservation Agent; protection of wetlands, etc.

  • Beaver institute training underway

  • Liaison for community on potential issues with management of open space & wetlands, invasive species, 100-200 foot guidelines

  • Typical day of an agent: office work, field work & lots of liaison work


The conversation runs about 13 minutes. Let’s listen to my conversation with Breeka Li


Audio file -> https://franklin-ma-matters.captivate.fm/episode/fm-920-town-of-franklin-intro-to-our-conservation-agent-01-12-23



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Conservation page ->  https://www.franklinma.gov/conservation 


Contact info ->  Conservation Agent/Natural Resource Protection Manager

(508) 520-4847


Open Space & Recreation plan update  https://www.franklinma.gov/conservation/pages/2023-open-space-and-recreation-plan-update 


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We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial.  


This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.


How can you help?

  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors

  • If you don't like something here, please let me know


Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.


For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/ or www.franklin.news/


If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com


The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.


I hope you enjoy!

------------------


You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"


Town of Franklin Conservation Agent: Breeka Li Goodlander
 Town of Franklin Conservation Agent: Breeka Li Goodlander (LinkedIn profile photo)

Sunday, July 17, 2022

Say "NO" to exempt from "a slew of environmental requirements" for a stadium

"The Massachusetts House passed legislation late Thursday that could clear the way for Robert Kraft to build a long-sought soccer stadium for the New England Revolution on a waterfront property steps from the Encore Boston Harbor casino in Everett.

Without floor debate or public input, lawmakers added language to a wide-ranging, multibillion-dollar economic development bill Thursday evening that would exempt the 43-acre industrial property straddling the Everett and Boston line from a slew of environmental requirements so it could be developed as a “sports, recreation or events center.”

Two people briefed on the legislation said the amendment is designed to aid Kraft’s pursuit of a soccer stadium after more than a decade of searching, but repeatedly failing to secure a new home for the Revolution in or around Boston."
Continue reading the article online at the Boston Globe (subscription maybe required)

Seth Godin in his podcast "Akimbo" addresses Stadium subsidies


And while there is economic value to such a proposed exemption, the worth of government subsidies for such stadiums was debunked by the Brookings Institute

Disclosure: yes, I happen to follow the Revolution as a season subscriber but that doesn't change my opinion on the "one" earth we have that is already challenged by climate change. We shouldn't be creating exemptions for this kind of building.

construction on new lighthouse tower at Gillette in June 2022
construction on new lighthouse tower at Gillette in June 2022

Friday, June 17, 2022

On the Climate front: gas companies say more gas is the answer; researchers finally calculate the cost in lives by acting now

Boston Globe:  "As gas companies plan for a climate future, their vision: more gas "
"Up on the fourth floor of Westin Copley Place this week, hundreds of natural gas representatives mingled among glossy posters and tables littered with branded baseball hats and Oreos. Among the niceties and exchanges of business cards it became quickly clear — the climate crisis is very much on people’s minds. Another thing became clear, too. The solution, as they see it, is more gas.

“Additional natural gas pipelines are the answer to many of the questions we face today,” Amy Andryszak, chief executive of the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America, told a panel audience Tuesday.

It was the 27th annual gathering of the Northeast LDC Gas Forum — nicknamed the “Best Deal-Making Conference” in the industry, according to the organizers, and seemingly as good a place as any to get the gas industry’s view of the climate crisis as it is lived every day in the executive suites, field sites, and maintenance trucks of the scores of companies that operate in New England."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

The Guardian: "How millions of lives can be saved if the US acts now on climate"
"The rapidly shrinking window of opportunity for the US to pass significant climate legislation will have mortal, as well as political, stakes. Millions of lives around the world will be saved, or lost, depending on whether America manages to propel itself towards a future without planet-heating emissions.

For the first time, researchers have calculated exactly how many people the US could save by acting on the climate crisis. A total of 7.4 million lives around the world will be saved over this century if the US manages to cut its emissions to net zero by 2050, according to the analysis.

The financial savings would be enormous, too, with a net zero America able to save the world $3.7tn in costs to adapt to the rising heat. As the world’s second largest polluter of greenhouse gases, the US and its political vagaries will in large part decide how many people in faraway countries will be subjected to deadly heat, as well as endure punishing storms, floods, drought and other consequences of the climate emergency."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

Just 10 US states could save 3.7 million lives worldwide by cutting their emissions to net zero. Photograph: Iuliia Bondar/Getty Images
Just 10 US states could save 3.7 million lives worldwide by cutting their emissions to net zero. Photograph: Iuliia Bondar/Getty Images

Making Sense of Climate #11 - Steve talks with Ted McIntyre - 06/09/22 (audio)

FM #817 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 817 in the series. 


This session of the radio show shares my conversation with Ted McIntyre, Franklin resident and climate activist. We recorded this via the Zoom conference bridge Thursday, May 19, 2022.  

This discussion continues our journey understanding the MA roadmap toward net zero and while helping me “make sense of climate”, we hope it helps with your understanding as well. 

If you have climate questions or Franklin specific climate questions, send them in and we’ll try to answer them in a future session.  

The conversation runs about 44 minutes. Let’s listen to my conversation with Ted.


Audio file -> 
https://franklin-ma-matters.captivate.fm/episode/fm-817-making-sense-of-climate-11-06-09-22


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Articles referenced are collected in one PDF

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1rczYh14x-r6emEQM7QXSHIkKIKHD7hQ6/view?usp=sharing 


See the page that collects the “Making Sense of Climate” episodes -> https://www.franklinmatters.org/2022/02/making-sense-of-climate-collection.html 

Conference committee members (3 from MA House & 3 from MA Senate)

House of Representatives: 

 

MA Senate: 


--------------

We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial.  


This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.


How can you help?

  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors

  • If you don't like something here, please let me know


Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.


For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/ or www.franklin.news/


If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com


The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.


I hope you enjoy!

------------------


You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"


Making Sense of Climate #11 - Steve talks with Ted McIntyre - 06/09/22 (audio)
Making Sense of Climate #11 - Steve talks with Ted McIntyre - 06/09/22 (audio)


Wednesday, May 25, 2022

State Representative Jeffrey Roy Endorsed for 10th Norfolk District by Environmental League of Massachusetts Action Fund

The Environmental League of Massachusetts Action Fund has endorsed Jeffrey Roy  in the election for State Representative of the 10th Norfolk District, a credit to his commitment to the environment and climate action. With issues of public health, environmental justice, transportation, and energy policy inextricably linked, we need leaders at every level of government who understand the pressing issues of their community and will call for ambitious action. 
 
“Chair Roy was central to the passage of the 2021 Roadmap Bill, one of the strongest climate laws in the nation,” said Casey Bowers, Executive Director of the ELM Action Fund. “He also crafted the House’s offshore wind bill which will ensure the industry takes off in Massachusetts and provides the clean energy we need to reach our Roadmap targets. We’re grateful for his leadership in addressing the climate crisis.”
 
“I am honored and grateful to receive the endorsement from the ELM Action Fund, a group that has led efforts to fight global warming and has been a great partner at the State House in advancing climate policy,” said Rep. Jeffrey N. Roy (D-Franklin). “Massachusetts has been a national leader in combating climate change and producing clean energy and I look forward to working with ELM to ensure that we continue to lead in this area.”
  
Chair Roy was first elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives for the 10th Norfolk District in 2012 and represents the residents of Franklin and Medway. He serves as the House chair of the Telecommunications, Energy, and Utilities (TUE) Committee. In 2021, he led efforts to finalize the Roadmap Bill on climate change. He is a proven leader in his work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and prioritize environmental justice (EJ) communities.
 
To learn more about Jeffrey Roy, visit his website at https://jeffreyroy.com/.
 

The Environmental League of Massachusetts (ELM) Action Fund is a nonpartisan organization that helps pass laws that protect our environmental legacy, holds our elected officials accountable, and works to build the political power of the environmental community. To learn more about our work and our recent electoral victories visit www.elmaction.org/elections.  

 https://twitter.com/EnviroLeagueMA/status/1526571203992989696

State Representative Jeffrey Roy Endorsed for 10th Norfolk District by Environmental League of Massachusetts Action Fund
State Representative Jeffrey Roy Endorsed for 10th Norfolk District by Environmental League of Massachusetts Action Fund 


Saturday, August 28, 2021

Report: "Massachusetts Cities and Towns Leading the Way to 100% Renewable Energy"

"Cities and towns are taking ambitious steps to increase renewable electricity generation, reduce energy use, and shift to clean heating technologies, according to a new report from the Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center.

“The best ideas for clean energy often start at the local level,” said Ben Hellerstein, state director for the center. “If we want to have cleaner air, healthier communities, and a safer future for our children, we need to move rapidly toward 100% renewable energy from sources like the sun and the wind. These communities are showing how to make it happen.”

The report, Renewable Communities 2021, features the following seven case studies of Massachusetts cities, towns and regional agencies that are leading the way to 100% renewable energy. "

Continue reading the article online


Visit Environmental Massachusetts for more information ->   https://environmentmassachusettscenter.org/

Report:  "Massachusetts Cities and Towns Leading the Way to 100% Renewable Energy"
Report:  "Massachusetts Cities and Towns Leading the Way to 100% Renewable Energy"


Thursday, September 17, 2020

In the News: "Baker plugs police reform, climate investments"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Beacon Hill has been nearly silent for more than six weeks since the House and Senate extended formal sessions beyond their traditional July 31 end, and Gov. Charlie Baker made a call Tuesday for legislators to wrap up their work on his State Police reforms and a $1 billion climate resiliency proposal.

Baker highlighted those two issues as priorities he hopes to see lawmakers advance, adding emphasis to those matters more than a month after wide-reaching law enforcement and climate bills were steered into conference committees for private negotiations.

When the topic of State Police came up at a Tuesday press conference, Baker said his administration referred about 40 individuals to state and federal attorneys for criminal review, then touted a bill he filed in January.

That legislation would make it easier to suspend troopers without pay following misconduct and create a “fraudulent pay statute” allowing the state or municipalities to seek triple the amount of damages from police who falsify timesheets, among other changes."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
 
Gov Baker press conference on Tuesday = https://youtu.be/CtXQBsxbC9k 

Wednesday, September 9, 2020

Significant Drought Conditions Continue Across MA


"Due to four months of below normal rainfall, Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Secretary Kathleen Theoharides today declared a Level 2 – Significant Drought in all seven regions of the Commonwealth – the Western, Connecticut River Valley, Central, Northeast, Southeast, Cape Cod, and Islands regions. The drought level remains unchanged from the previous month’s declaration. 

At a Level 2 – Significant Drought, as outlined in the Massachusetts Drought Management Plan, conditions are becoming significantly dry and warrant detailed monitoring of drought conditions, close coordination among state and federal agencies, emphasis on water conservation, more stringent watering restrictions, and technical outreach and assistance for the affected municipalities.

“Although recent rain events have been helpful, the combination of four months of below normal rainfall and consistently above normal temperatures throughout the summer have led to very dry conditions in every region of Massachusetts,” said Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Kathleen Theoharides. 

“All levels of government are coordinating to address these critical drought conditions, and it is essential that residents and businesses across the Commonwealth take extra care to conserve water both indoors and outdoors and be mindful of the increased risk of brush and wildland fire when using any fire or smoking materials.”
Continue reading the article on the MA.gov page  

Significant Drought Conditions Continue Across MA
Significant Drought Conditions Continue Across MA


Picked up for Franklin radar from Twitter  https://t.co/vccgSca2fD 


Monday, February 24, 2020

"a really creative solution to a longstanding environmental problem”

From the Boston Globe, an article of interest to Franklin
"About 19 miles east of Boston Harbor, beside a national marine sanctuary that’s home to one of the world’s richest fishing grounds, lies one of the nation’s largest offshore dumping sites of radioactive waste. 
In less than 300 feet of water, thousands of barrels litter the seafloor, a mile-wide toxic junkyard that fishermen call “The Foul Area.” 
It’s called that because many have tangled — or fouled — their gear in the barrel field, at times even pulling up containers filled with toxic chemicals. Government reports and congressional testimony over the years have suggested the dumping ground may include plutonium and other highly dangerous materials discarded after the completion of the Manhattan Project during World War II. 
Now, the federal government is trying to bury the barrels at least three feet deep with roughly 10 million tons of sediment dredged from a $340 million project to widen shipping channels in Boston Harbor. Capping the toxic material — which includes unexploded munitions — was seen as a safer way of minimizing risks, rather than trying to bring the rusting barrels to the surface."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/02/22/metro/mile-wide-toxic-waste-site-sits-ocean-floor-near-stellwagen-bank/

Location of the industrial waste site in Massachusetts Bay Source: New England District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Location of the industrial waste site in Massachusetts Bay Source: New England District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Saturday, January 25, 2020

“Everyone’s really exposed to a toxic soup of these PFAS chemicals”

While the MA DEP is making the rounds seeking public input on proposed regulations, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has come out with a report showing the problem might be more than estimated.
"The contamination of US drinking water with manmade “forever chemicals” is far worse than previously estimated with some of the highest levels found in Miami, Philadelphia and New Orleans, said a report on Wednesday by an environmental watchdog group. 
The chemicals, resistant to breaking down in the environment, are known as perfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. Some have been linked to cancers, liver damage, low birth weight and other health problems. 
The findings here by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) show the group’s previous estimate in 2018, based on unpublished US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) data, that 110 million Americans may be contaminated with PFAS, could be far too low."
Continue reading the article online 
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jan/22/us-drinking-water-contamination-forever-chemicals-pfas

The link to the EWG report  https://www.ewg.org/research/national-pfas-testing/

Video link = https://youtu.be/R_D0tbKQGis




Saturday, January 11, 2020

EPA "has a long history of failing to act"

Via the Environmental Working Group:

"This week the House voted overwhelmingly to pass H.R. 535, the PFAS Action Act, which President Trump has threatened to veto.

The bill would set deadlines for the Environmental Protection Agency to reduce ongoing releases of toxic fluorinated chemicals, known as PFAS, and to set a drinking water standard for two notorious PFAS chemicals.

“It’s never been clearer that it’s time for Congress to set tough deadlines to reduce PFAS releases into the air and water, set PFAS drinking water standards, and clean up legacy PFAS pollution,” said EWG Senior Vice President for Government Affairs Scott Faber. “If the Trump administration won’t take the necessary steps to protect the public from PFAS, it’s up to Congress to act."

In other news about the PFAS Action Act, EWG broke down EPA’s history of inaction when it comes regulating PFAS and told the story of a military firefighter pushing for Congress to act on the PFAS crisis."

Continue reading the article online
https://www.ewg.org/news-and-analysis/2020/01/ewg-news-roundup-110-trump-threatens-derail-pfas-action-california-fails

Related links

H.R. 535, the PFAS Action Act
https://www.ewg.org/release/ewg-applauds-historic-bipartisan-pfas-vote

Trump threatens veto
https://www.ewg.org/release/trump-threatens-veto-after-missing-key-pfas-drinking-water-deadline

EPA's history of inaction on PFAS
https://www.ewg.org/news-and-analysis/2020/01/it-s-time-end-epa-s-long-history-failing-act-forever-chemicals

Environmental Working Group
Environmental Working Group

Monday, November 18, 2019

Pantherbook Series: Environmental Investigations

via Pantherbook we find:
"In recent years, environmental issues have taken center stage in political discussions across the globe. How do these large-scale issues affect Franklin? Answering this question is the goal of Pantherbook’s newest series, known as Environmental Investigations.

Each week, a new article will be posted detailing an ecological problem pertaining to Franklin High School, or the town as a whole.

The series will be kicked off by Anika Patchala, who will talk about FHS’s resident environmental activists: the Green Team. Halle Goldsmith will discuss recycling practices and Amanda Wylie will inform readers about plant-based meat as a solution to meat overconsumption. Next, Gretchen Scotland will detail the issue of forest fragmentation in Franklin. Amelia Johnson-Pelligri will investigate the purportedly unsustainable cafeteria practices at FHS. Finally, Elise Ravich will summarize the findings of other journalists by describing the most effective ways for readers to get involved."
Continue reading about the new series
https://franklinpanthers.us/top-stories/2019/11/15/upcoming-series-environmental-investigations/


Is Franklin doing a good job conserving beautiful landscapes like this one? (Photo by Emily Cesa)
Is Franklin doing a good job conserving beautiful landscapes like this one? (Photo by Emily Cesa)

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

"it’s something they should be aware of”

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"When determining if a beach is safe for swimming, local health departments and state officials measure levels of the bacteria enterococcus, which typically makes its way into marine water through fecal matter. High levels of enterococci in ocean water are a red flag that the water may also contain other disease-inducing microbes, which is why it is referred to as an “indicator” bacteria.

This is why beaches are often closed after heavy rainstorms — rain that isn’t absorbed into the soil or diverted can pick up fecal matter from pets and wild animals and flow it into the ocean.

“Stormwater is a major culprit for beach closures related to fecal bacteria,” said Bethany Traverse, coordinator of the Barnstable County Department of Health and Environment’s beach water testing program. “In any populated area, you have roadways and other infrastructure that affect the flow of contaminated water into the surrounding water bodies. When it rains, a lot of water is diverted into storm drains and away from bathing areas. But it’s not perfect; bird and animal waste will make its way into the water and storm water helps it get there in a rapid ‘flush.’”
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190813/just-how-much-waste-is-in-that-water-youre-swimming-in/1

The full Environment America report
https://environmentamerica.org/feature/ame/safe-swimming

More than half of the thousands of beach sites sampled for bacteria across the country were potentially unsafe for swimming on at least one day in 2018
More than half of the thousands of beach sites sampled for bacteria across the country were potentially unsafe for swimming on at least one day in 2018

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Legislature Passes Balanced Budget with Targeted Investments in Education, Housing, Environment

Per Senate President Karen E. Spilka:
"Today (Monday) the Massachusetts Legislature passed its Fiscal Year 2020 (FY20) budget, which invests in programs and services across the Commonwealth. Funded at $43.1 billion, the budget makes major investments in education, housing, substance use disorder services, health care, and other areas while projecting a more than $476 million deposit into the Stabilization Fund – bringing the fund’s balance to more than $3 billion to safeguard the future of vital programs and services.

“I am proud of this fiscally responsible budget that supports the needs of individuals, families, and communities across the Commonwealth through thoughtful investments that increase local aid, strengthen our health care system and protect the environment,” said House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo (D-Winthrop). “This budget bolsters our ongoing efforts to combat the opioid crisis, invest in high-quality early education and care and makes another significant deposit into the state’s Stabilization Fund. These investments will have a long and lasting positive effect on the residents of Massachusetts. I want to thank Chair Michlewitz for his leadership and my colleagues in the House, especially those on the conference committee, who worked to put this package together.”

“Education is a top Senate priority, and I am therefore proud of the significant investments we make in K-12 education in the final FY2020 budget,” said Senate President Karen E. Spilka (D-Ashland). “Not only have we voted to advance the largest year-over-year increase in Chapter 70 education funding in the last two decades, we have also made a substantial down payment towards funding the recommendations of the Foundation Budget Review Commission (FBRC). In addition, we fund health and wellness in schools, and provide considerable increases in reimbursement for special education, charter schools, and regional school transportation. Finally, I am very pleased that the conference budget includes $10 million in new funding for mental and behavioral health. These funds will allow the Commonwealth to address the root causes of many of the challenges facing our residents, including substance abuse, homelessness, unemployment and schoolbullying, among other things. I commend all of the members of the conference committee for their very fine work on this budget.”
Continue reading the full copy of the press release on the Joint Budget for FY 2020
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0wjbnXDBhczNnNMbzZDNFBwX1k4OVR0dktMQlFHVEFVR3Fr/view?usp=sharing

 While the bill was filed Sunday per the article the web page had not yet been updated as of Monday evening. The budget should find its way here eventually
https://malegislature.gov/Budget/ConferenceCommittee
 

https://malegislature.gov/Budget/ConferenceCommittee
https://malegislature.gov/Budget/ConferenceCommittee

Thursday, January 10, 2019

“If we don’t take care of that, we don’t have to worry about education"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Senate President Karen Spilka told a room full of environmental advocates on Wednesday that nothing the Legislature does in the next two years will be as important as addressing climate change, but the Democratic leader gave no assurances of what that policy solution might look like. 
Spilka, who was elected to her first full term as president last week, dropped by a breakfast event where she described a “real sense of urgency” on Beacon Hill to tackle climate change. 
“We all agree this is a matter of some urgency. It’s just how are we going to accomplish what we want to accomplish,” Spilka said at a breakfast at Carrie Nation organized by the Environmental League of Massachusetts. 
Spilka, of Ashland, asked activists in the room to step forward with “smart, practical, implementable ideas.”

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190109/climate-change-at-top-of-spilkas-list

The Environmental League of Massachusetts (ELM) is committed to combating climate change
The Environmental League of Massachusetts (ELM) is committed to combating climate change

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

“The schools don’t exist in isolation"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"In response to two incidents late last school year where a swastika was found drawn on the wall of a school building, administrators are taking steps to keep hate out of Franklin schools. 
“We knew that when we came back in the fall we would want to revisit this to reassure our students and our families that we are committed to a welcoming and respectful environment,” said Superintendent Sara Ahern. 
Last school year, there were three separate incidents of the hate symbol being scribbled on walls. The first was found in one of the elementary schools in late winter. In June, two more swastikas were found at other schools. 
Though unable to find who was responsible, Ahern said she plans to fight back with education and awareness. Instead of simply erasing the swastikas and putting the ordeal behind them, Ahern is keeping the issue front and center."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required) 
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170911/franklin-schools-act-against-hatred

flower boxes and positive messages line the walk way to Remington Middle School
flower boxes and positive messages line the walk way to Remington Middle School

Thursday, December 8, 2016

"Collapse" the Chronicle show about honey bees features Ed Szymanski in one segment

via Ed Szymanski
"Collapse", the Chronicle show about honey bees (yes, I'm in it) will be re-aired this Friday night, Ch. 5, 7:30 PM. 
It's a great show talking about the troubles bees face and what is being done. 
Not just saying that because I'm part of it."

screen grab of the Chronicle intro
screen grab of the Chronicle intro

If you are out and about on Friday, here are links to view the video segments from the WCVB 5 archives

http://www.wcvb.com/.../chronicle-why-are-the.../41786964

http://www.wcvb.com/.../chronicle-theyll-take.../41787238


http://www.wcvb.com/.../chronicle-make-your.../41787062   (Ed is in this one!)

http://www.wcvb.com/.../chronicle-eat-candy-save.../41787050


screen grab of bees from the Chronicle show
screen grab of bees from the Chronicle show

For more about Neonicotinoids  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neonicotinoid

And "Beyond Pesticides"  http://www.beyondpesticides.org/programs/bee-protective-pollinators-and-pesticides/chemicals-implicated

For more about Ed  http://www.pchman.com/