Showing posts with label energy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label energy. Show all posts

Tuesday, May 17, 2022

“If we give nature a chance, and back off from fighting it, it comes back”

REP. PATRICIA HADDAD of Somerset, long a powerful figure in the Massachusetts House, is now also the star of a new documentary written, directed, and produced by California-based filmmaker Kiki Goshay about America’s love affair with energy.

The documentary’s strength is the long look it takes at the country’s haphazard energy evolution from one president to the next, and from one crisis to the next. The story is told using Haddad and Somerset as the laboratory where those twists and turns play out – often with devastating personal and environmental consequences.

Continue reading the article online

Listen to this episode of The Codcast  https://soundcloud.com/massinc/empowered-somerset


Monday, May 16, 2022

Get ready for Saturday, May 21 - Recycling event at Beaver Pond, Earth Day Clean up at DelCarte

1 - Recycling and Energy Drive
Saturday May 14 from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM at Chilson Beach (Beaver Pond)
Details in the flyer found here (download a copy as a reminder)



Get ready for Saturday, May 21 - Recycling event at Beaver Pond
Get ready for Saturday, May 21 - Recycling event at Beaver Pond

2 - Earth Day Clean up at DelCarte Recreation Area
t-shirts provided for volunteers, community service hours certified as needed
Scheduled for 9 AM to Noon, Saturday, May 21 
Meet at the playground parking lot
Additional details can be found on the Town page


Earth Day Clean up at DelCarte Recreation Area
Earth Day Clean up at DelCarte Recreation Area

DelCarte Recreation Area parking lot
DelCarte Recreation Area parking lot on Pleasant St 

Saturday, May 7, 2022

If all we get is 5%, maybe it is time to ask what can we do better?

When most people toss a plastic bottle or cup into the recycling bin, they assume that means the plastic is recycled – but a new report lays bare how rarely that actually happens.

According to the Last Beach Cleanup and Beyond Plastics, the organization behind the report released on Wednesday, the recycling rate for post-consumer plastic was just 5% to 6% in 2021.

The Department of Energy also released a research paper this week, which analyzed data from 2019, and came to the same number: only 5% of plastics are being recycled. The researchers on that report wrote that landfilled plastic waste in the United States has been on the rise for many reasons, including “low recycling rates, population growth, consumer preference for single-use plastics, and low disposal fees in certain parts of the country”, according to a press release.

Continue reading the article (subscription may be required)

Last Beach Cleanup & Beyond Plastics report -> 

 

If all we get is 5%, maybe it is time to ask what can we do better?
If all we get is 5%, maybe it is time to ask what can we do better?

Tuesday, February 8, 2022

Recap on Energy/Climate front: one step forward, two steps back

Something to watch for as a key component of the MA net zero goals: 
"Administration officials did not respond to requests for comment, but the Department of Energy Resources notified stakeholders it was releasing on Tuesday a “straw proposal” containing updates to the existing stretch code and a framework for an “opt-in specialized stretch code.” 
Sources said the revisions to the state building code would deal primarily with windows, insulation, and other measures to reduce energy usage. The opt-in specialized stretch code would allow communities to voluntarily take additional measures that would accelerate energy conservation, including requiring all new construction to include rooftop solar where practicable. 
The stretch code would also require new construction to be equipped for full electrification and to meet at least some passive house standards, the goal of which is to dramatically limit energy usage."
Continue reading the article online ->

Baker seeking major changes in building code
Baker seeking major changes in building code


While the building codes may move forward, a move by the ISO-New England group apparently moves the State efforts backward.

"At a time when New England should be racing to bring as much clean energy online as possible to green its electricity supply, the grid moved this past week to effectively discourage major wind and solar projects for at least another two years.

Like other regional power suppliers, New England’s grid operator has been asked by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to remove or change a mechanism that makes it harder for clean energy projects to enter the competitive market. But after months of saying it supported such a measure, ISO-New England reversed its stance last week and aligned with a proposal from the natural gas industry that would slow-walk any such change.

“It’s another example of not meeting the moment to usher in the clean energy transition,” said Jeremy McDiarmid, of the Northeast Clean Energy Council. “It is an example of the system not being equipped to change as fast as we need it to.”
Continue reading the article online (subscription maybe required)

MAPC: Resources for Low-Income Residents to lower their energy bills


25% of U.S. households have a high energy burden -- meaning they spend a a high percentage of their incomes on energy bills. @AllInEnergy helps people lower their bills through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and income-based discounts.

https://t.co/Xde1rIAt80   or   https://www.mapc.org/planning101/reducing-energy-burden-resources-for-low-income-residents/

Shared from Twitter: https://twitter.com/MAPCMetroBoston/status/1490683515188355073

MAPC: Resources for Low-Income Residents to lower their energy bills
MAPC: Resources for Low-Income Residents to lower their energy bills

Friday, September 24, 2021

State Representative Roy: What's happening - September 2021 Newsletter


Logo

Your support is greatly appreciated!

Thank you

I just wanted to take a moment to thank everyone who attended my event on September 8 in Franklin. It was an amazing evening and I am so grateful we could all reconnect in person. It was a treat turning 60 with so many of you present. You can view photos from the night by clicking here.

I have some people that I need to thank for all their efforts and support. Thanks to the whole team at La Cantina Winery for hosting us at their beautiful outdoor space. I also want to thank the team at The Rome Restaurant for providing, as always, such delicious food.

I would also like to thank Dr. Michael Walker-Jones, Jennifer Knight, Tom Mercer, Mike Doherty, Representative Mike Soter, Congressman Jake Auchincloss, and Majority Leader Claire Cronin for giving such thoughtful and kind remarks. I am honored and humbled by their friendship and support over the years.

If you haven't had a chance to donate towards the event yet, and you want to support our 2022 campaign, you can do so by clicking here.

Thank you all again for coming. I couldn't have spent my 60th birthday with better people. I look forward to seeing you all again soon.

Jeff

Energy/recycling event in Franklin

We had a very successful Recycling and Energy Event in Franklin. Over 300 cars were served and over 100 dehumidifiers were delivered in exchange for $30 and a rebate on a new purchase. The program typically brings in 1,600 dehumidifiers annually across the state, and we did 100 in just one day.

We also collected four truckloads of furniture for Habitat for Humanity and two truckloads of electronics for recycling. And we had folks from Eversource and Mass Save sign up several customers for energy savings repairs in their homes.

It was a great way to help fight climate change and reduce energy costs. Many thanks to Fred Cullen at Green Team Junk Removal, Marcie Rappa, National Grid, EverSource, MassSave, Habitat for Humanity, and the Town of Franklin for helping put it all together and make it a success.

And thank you to the residents for helping save the planet by showing up and turning in your unused goods and and giving them new life.

Copyright (C) 2021 State Rep Jeff Roy. All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email because you either contacted our office or indicated you wanted to keep updated on the 10th Norfolk District and things going on at the State House.

Our mailing address is:

State Rep Jeff Roy
State House Room 43
Boston, MA 02133

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

The newsletter was shortened for publication here. To view the full set of contents, follow this link ->  https://mailchi.mp/4ef97d58f1fd/whats-happening-september-2021-newsletter?

Friday, March 19, 2021

"Oil firms knew decades ago fossil fuels posed grave health risks, files reveal"

"The oil industry knew at least 50 years ago that air pollution from burning fossil fuels posed serious risks to human health, only to spend decades aggressively lobbying against clean air regulations, a trove of internal documents seen by the Guardian reveal.

The documents, which include internal memos and reports, show the industry was long aware that it created large amounts of air pollution, that pollutants could lodge deep in the lungs and be “real villains in health effects”, and even that its own workers may be experiencing birth defects among their children.

But these concerns did little to stop oil and gas companies, and their proxies, spreading doubt about the growing body of science linking the burning of fossil fuels to an array of health problems that kill millions of people around the world each year. Echoing the fossil-fuel industry’s history of undermining of climate science, oil and gas interests released a torrent of material aimed at raising uncertainty over the harm caused by air pollution and used this to deter US lawmakers from placing further limits on pollutants."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

Monday, March 8, 2021

CommonWealth Magazine: "Home energy upgrades could be challenge"

 

"THE MASSACHUSETTS LEGISLATURE has once again sent a comprehensive climate bill to Gov. Charlie Baker, and this time Baker has sent it back with a series of amendments. While the two sides agree on the broad terms of the bill, a major sticking point is an interim goal on the road to net zero emissions by 2050. The bill would mandate that emission levels reach 50 percent of 1990 levels by 2030. The Baker administration (and current state policy) favors a 45 percent goal.

That difference of 5 points almost seems like a rounding error, but it has major implications for everyday residents, especially for homeowners. Among other measures, Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs Kathleen Theoharides says that extra 5 percentage points would require the complete elimination of heating oil. EEA estimates retrofitting oil-heated homes would cost an additional $3 billion over 10 years. Meanwhile, under either interim target scenario, tens of thousands of homes need to convert from carbon-heavy fuels like oil and gas to renewables like solar and wind." 

Continue reading the article online

CommonWealth Magazine: "Home energy upgrades could be challenge"
CommonWealth Magazine: "Home energy upgrades could be challenge"


Thursday, February 25, 2021

FM #470 - Interview with State Rep Jeff Roy - 02/22/21 (audio)

FM #470 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 470 in the series. 

This session of the radio show shares my conversation with Franklin’s State Representative Jeffrey Roy. We had our conversation via conference bridge to adhere to the ‘social distancing’ requirements of this pandemic period.

We talk about: 
  • Indoor riding to prepare for his 19th PanMass Challenge
  • Thursday night continues COVID-19 modified rehearsal with Ben Gardner’s Boat 
  • Outlook for 2021
  • Pandemic, vaccine, oversight of Gov Baker and pandemic process
  • Committee assignment: Joint Committee on Telecommunication, Utilities, and Energy
  • What bills did you Intro/or re-introduce for this session
Links to Jeff's personal web page as well as his Legislative pages are included in the show notes. The recording runs about 42 minutes, so let’s listen to my conversation with Jeff.  Audio file = 
https://player.captivate.fm/episode/c7fea725-a210-4022-8eeb-1024c04e576a


--------------

Rep Roy’s State Legislator profile page which lists the bills he filed for the 192nd Session  https://malegislature.gov/Legislators/Profile/JNR1 

Rep Roy’s personal page  https://jeffreyroy.com/ 

--------------

We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm).

This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.
 
How can you help?

  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors
  • If you don't like something here, please let me know

Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.
 
For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/ 

If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com

The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.

I hope you enjoy!

------------------

You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"

Rep Roy on his tour of UMass Medical in Nov 2019 as part of his visits to all 29 MA Commonwealth public colleges
Rep Roy on his tour of UMass Medical in Nov 2019 as part of his visits to all 29 MA Commonwealth public colleges

Saturday, October 31, 2020

“The clock has run out on us"

From CommonWealth Magazine we share an article of interest for Franklin:

"THE TOWN OF WEYMOUTH will drop its ongoing legal fight against a controversial natural gas project, and energy giant Enbridge will pay the municipality $10 million as part of a newly reached host community agreement that immediately drew condemnation from opponents of the compressor station.

With the compressor station already built and awaiting permission to advance after recent emergency shutdowns, municipal and company officials announced a joint agreement Friday, ending years of courtroom battles.

Enbridge will pay Weymouth $10 million within 30 days. Town officials said in a press release that the money will go toward a range of public safety, infrastructure, and environmental uses.

The company will also help the town seek changes to the state tax structure in an attempt to avoid a “less favorable property tax structure from being applied to the compressor station upon operation,” the town wrote in a press release. If successful, Weymouth could collect up to $28 million more in property taxes over the next 35 years. "

Continue reading article online

Wednesday, September 9, 2020

Significant Drought Conditions Continue Across MA


"Due to four months of below normal rainfall, Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) Secretary Kathleen Theoharides today declared a Level 2 – Significant Drought in all seven regions of the Commonwealth – the Western, Connecticut River Valley, Central, Northeast, Southeast, Cape Cod, and Islands regions. The drought level remains unchanged from the previous month’s declaration. 

At a Level 2 – Significant Drought, as outlined in the Massachusetts Drought Management Plan, conditions are becoming significantly dry and warrant detailed monitoring of drought conditions, close coordination among state and federal agencies, emphasis on water conservation, more stringent watering restrictions, and technical outreach and assistance for the affected municipalities.

“Although recent rain events have been helpful, the combination of four months of below normal rainfall and consistently above normal temperatures throughout the summer have led to very dry conditions in every region of Massachusetts,” said Energy and Environmental Affairs Secretary Kathleen Theoharides. 

“All levels of government are coordinating to address these critical drought conditions, and it is essential that residents and businesses across the Commonwealth take extra care to conserve water both indoors and outdoors and be mindful of the increased risk of brush and wildland fire when using any fire or smoking materials.”
Continue reading the article on the MA.gov page  

Significant Drought Conditions Continue Across MA
Significant Drought Conditions Continue Across MA


Picked up for Franklin radar from Twitter  https://t.co/vccgSca2fD 


Monday, August 3, 2020

FM #320 Town Council - PACE Program - 7/29/20 (audio)

FM #320 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 320 in the series.

This session shares a key segment of the Franklin, MA Town Council meeting held on Wednesday, July 29, 2020. The meeting was conducted via conference bridge to adhere to the ‘social distancing’ requirements of this pandemic period.

Chair Tom Mercer opened the meeting on schedule. The agenda eventually gets to the second item for presentation, the PACE Program. Wendy Lee O’Malley, Vice-President of MassDevelopment provides the overview of this newly released program. This is an opportunity for business and nonprofit property owners to get advantageous financing for energy improvements.

The show notes contain links to the meeting agenda and to the individual documents referenced.

This meeting segment runs just about 21 minutes, so let’s listen to the presentation and discussion on the PACE Program.

Audio file:   https://www.hipcast.com/podcast/HXv4XmdK





--------------

Town Council agenda
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/07/franklin-ma-town-council-agenda-july-29.html

PACE Program doc and presentation
https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif591/f/mai/files/8b._pace_program_presentation_-_massdevelopment.pdf

My notes from the meeting
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/07/town-council-recap-reluctantly-approves.html

--------------
We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial.

This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.

How can you help?
  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors
  • If you don't like something here, please let me know

Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.

For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/
If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com

The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana" c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.

I hope you enjoy!
------------------

You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"


FM #320 Town Council - PACE Program - 7/29/20 (audio)
FM #320 Town Council - PACE Program - 7/29/20 (audio)

Friday, May 10, 2019

MassCEC launches pilot program for whole-home heat pumps




MassCEC launches pilot program for whole-home heat pumps

Announcing the Whole-Home
Air-Source Heat Pump Pilot Program

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center ("MassCEC") is excited to announce the launch of our Whole-Home Air-Source Heat Pump Pilot.

MassCEC has allocated $500,000 to provide rebates for the installation of whole-home air-source heat pump ("ASHP") systems at residential properties – specifically at existing homes with natural gas and new construction projects designed to operate without fossil fuels. This pilot is meant to support ASHP systems that function as the sole source of heating in a home without the need for supplementary or back-up heat. The Pilot will accept applications until December 31, 2019 or until all allocated funding has been awarded
MassCEC launches pilot program for whole-home heat pumps
HVAC contractors interested in becoming a participating installer should review the requirements in the Pilot Program Manual and reach out to ashp@masscec.com with any questions.

Through the pilot program, MassCEC will promote projects at the leading edge of Massachusetts' strategic electrification efforts. A major goal of the pilot is collecting learnings and information on whole-home ASHP systems, so we look forward to sharing preliminary results, lessons learned, and case studies through the pilot program. Read our blog post to learn more about the goals of the pilot, and please reach out to us if you have any questions or ideas.

Further program information can be found at www.masscec.com/clean-heating-and-cooling/air-source-heat-pumps.
Warmly,
The MassCEC Air-Source Heat Pump Team
Massachusetts Clean Energy Center
The MassCEC Air-Source Heat Pump Team
Massachusetts Clean Energy Center
63 Franklin St, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02110
617-315-9300 |
ASHP@masscec.com


Massachusetts Clean Energy Center  
Grow the state's clean energy industry while helping to meet the Commonwealth's clean energy and climate goals.


Copyright © 2019 Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, All rights reserved
63 Franklin Street, 3rd Floor
Boston, MA 02110

Phone: 617-315-9300
Fax: 617-315-9356

Thursday, February 21, 2019

On this date: Feb 21, 2009 - energy efficiency

In 2009, I find I did skip posting on 2/21/09, and shared the Milford Daily News article about energy efficiency steps being taken by Franklin on 2/22. These energy efficiency steps are being continued today.
"Michael D'Angelo, the facilities director for the schools and the town, takes pride in Franklin taking the lead in using technological advances early in the game. 
"We were doing it before it was popular," said D'Angelo, who is constantly researching ways to make the schools as energy-efficient as possible - he's currently eyeing the installation of solar panels three years down the road, when he says they will be cost-effective."
Read the post in the archives for 2/22/09
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2009/02/you-dont-see-difference.html

Franklin was named a "green community" in 2018. One of the reasons it took so long to get named is we were already too efficient to qualify for the state designation.
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2018/06/franklin-green-community-recognition.html

Franklin Green Community recognition event - Jun 7, 2018
Franklin Green Community recognition event - Jun 7, 2018

Sunday, January 13, 2019

"administration’s decision advances a project sought by the natural gas industry"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"In a decision blasted by South Shore lawmakers as reckless, irresponsible and dangerous, Gov. Charlie Baker’s administration on Friday approved air quality permits for a natural gas compressor station in Weymouth, with state environmental regulators concluding the Enbridge Energy project conforms with air pollution regulations. 
The project will support natural gas capacity upgrades and the expansion of a gas transmission pipeline system that runs from Mahwah, New Jersey, to Beverly, Massachusetts, for transportation and deliveries on the Maritimes & Northeast Pipeline system. Collectively, it’s referred to as the Atlantic Bridge Project, which includes the siting of the compressor station, and which received federal approval in January 2017. 
“This reckless and irresponsible decision is harmful to the health, safety and well-being of residents of Weymouth and the entire South Shore,” said Rep. James Murphy, D-Weymouth, in a statement released after state energy officials disclosed their decision just before 5 p.m. Friday. 
“Generations of residents living in the Fore River basin have been burdened by industrial pollutants. These industries once supplied much-needed jobs to the area, while simultaneously poisoning the earth, water and air,” added state Rep. Ronald Mariano, D-Quincy. “Now, Enbridge plans to expose current and future generations of Quincy and Weymouth residents to a new source of toxins, all in the name of padding the profits of a multinational energy corporation. With today’s decision, Enbridge is one step closer to succeeding.”

https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190113/baker-oks-air-permits-for-natural-gas-project

Given the approval provided by Governor Baker, could the Algonquin Pipeline Expansion come back on the table? It was proposed to run through Franklin. It is still shown as part of the Atlantic Bridge Project. Check the green lines on the map shown.

https://www.enbridge.com/projects-and-infrastructure/projects/atlantic-bridge#projectdetails:project-to-date

The Atlantic Bridge Project is designed to provide additional capacity
"The Atlantic Bridge Project is designed to provide additional capacity"


Tuesday, January 8, 2019

In the News: sign bylaw up for change; energy saving tips

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

Sign Zoning Bylaw up for Town Council review/vote
"Regulations on signs in town are very loose, but that may soon change. 
The bylaw, written in 2012, is up for a public hearing on Wednesday, during the next Town Council meeting. 
Bryan Taberner, director of Planning and Community Development, said that the bylaw does not regulate how many signs can be in one plaza. For example, if a plaza in town had 10 businesses, there could be 10 different signs, one for each business. 
That reason, he said, is why the pending bylaw is going to be important."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190107/franklin-sign-bylaw-to-change


  • Zoning Bylaw Amendment 18-822: Changes to §185-20. Signs

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/franklinma/files/mai/files/zoning_bylaw_amendment_18-822.pdf

  • Zoning Bylaw Amendment 18-823: Changes To Sign District Regulations

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/franklinma/files/mai/files/zoning_bylaw_amendment_18-823.pdf


  • Zoning Bylaw Amendment 18-824: Changes To Sign District Overlay Map

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/franklinma/files/mai/files/zoning_bylaw_amendment_18-824.pdf


Sign Zoning Bylaw up for Town Council review/vote
Sign Zoning Bylaw up for Town Council review/vote




Energy saving tips
"Massachusetts residents are no strangers to expensive energy costs, especially during colder months. 
A recent report by Move.org shows Massachusetts residents on average pay the eighth-highest utility costs in the country -- $469 per month -- and the fourth highest in New England. 
What some residents don’t know, however, is that there are several ways to make changes -- big and small -- around any home or apartment that could help lower those costs. 
“Becoming more energy efficient is the single-most important step a homeowner or renter can take to gain control of their energy use and energy costs,” said Bill Stack, energy efficiency manager for Eversource, one of the state’s largest utility companies."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190107/tips-to-save-on-energy-costs-in-massachusetts

Which states pay the most for utilities?
Which states pay the most for utilities?

Friday, September 7, 2018

Changes to MassCEC's Woodstove Changeout - Extended to Sep 25




Changes to MassCEC's Woodstove Changeout - Extended to Sep 25

Dear Friends of MassCEC's Clean Heating and Cooling Programs,


We have updates for you regarding our Woodstove Change-Out and Air-Source Heat Pump Programs. Enclosed are details on making the move to low-emission stoves as well as information about new ASHP rebate levels.

Woodstove Change-Out Extended!

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) is extending the 2018 Woodstove Change-Out Program deadline to September 25, 2018.

Any Massachusetts resident or business currently operating a non-EPA-certified wood stove or fireplace insert is eligible for a rebate of up to $1,750 when replacing an existing stove with an eligible model. Those that meet certain income requirements are eligible for rebates of up to $3,000. To date, 114 woodstoves have been changed out with our program and we've awarded $193,500 in rebates.

If you own an old wood stove and would like to replace it with a new, low-emission EPA-certified wood or pellet stove, visit MassCEC's website to find out more. You will need to contact a local stove professional who can determine the eligibility of your old stove and submit a rebate application on your behalf after installing your new stove. Act now to make sure you don't miss this newly extended application deadline!

 

Air-Source Heat Pump Updates


The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) is making some changes to our Residential Air-Source Heat Pump Program. This program provides rebates for the installation of qualifying air source heat pump systems at homes and small businesses in Massachusetts.

The new standard rebate levels will range from $500 to $2,500. Homeowners that meet certain income requirements will be eligible for rebates of up to $4,000. Those replacing electric resistance heating with heat pumps are eligible for additional funds.

The changes to the program can be found in our 
Program Manual. Any applications submitted after November 1 will be subject to the new rebate amounts.

If you would like to install a heat pump in your home, visit
MassCEC's website to find out more. You will need to contact an eligible installer who will discuss with you what heat pumps will satisfy your needs and complete the install.

Thank you for your interest in our Commonwealth Woodstove Change-Out and Air-Source Programs!

Massachusetts Clean Energy Center  
Grow the state's clean energy industry while helping to meet the Commonwealth's clean energy and climate goals.

Copyright © 2018 Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, All rights reserved.
Our mailing address is:
63 Franklin Street, 3rd Floor
Boston, MA 02110

Phone: 617-315-9300
Fax: 617-315-9356

Massachusetts Clean Energy Center · 63 Franklin Street · 3rd Floor · Boston, MA 02110 · USA