Showing posts with label World War II. Show all posts
Showing posts with label World War II. Show all posts

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

"Reconstructing History and Genealogy: Mom's WWII Letters" - Nov 10

Join us for our next installment of our SECOND SUNDAY SPEAKER SERIES, Sunday November 10 = "Reconstructing History and Genealogy: Mom's WWII Letters"

The discovery of more than 100 letters and correspondence from WWII brought unexpected insights and connections for Corinne Smith.

In May 2017, she found her mother's stash of letters from 16 servicemen that she had corresponded with in 1944-1945. Most of the men were from her mother's hometown of Allentown, Pennsylvania, or from her college roommate's hometown of Trenton, New Jersey. Nearly all of the writers were now gone and could no longer offer information or explanations for what they had written. Corinne began to trace the soldiers' family trees with one goal in mind: to return the letters in person to their children. 

Learn about her on-going project, and hear some of the stories of the men, their experiences, and what their relatives have to say today. This presentation links history and genealogy to present-day research and diligence. It revisits a time that we may not want to forget. And it may prompt audience members to wonder for themselves what treasures may be lurking in their own old family boxes -- and how they can share the information with others.

This is a 90 minute presentation with slides. The museum opens at 1:00 and the presentation begins at 1:10. Admission is free. 

Please consider bringing a non-perishable food item for the Franklin Food Pantry. This event is sponsored by the Friends of the Franklin Historical Museum. Our gift shop is open and Franklin Common Gazebo ornaments are available while they last.

 
"Reconstructing History and Genealogy: Mom's WWII Letters" - Nov 10
"Reconstructing History and Genealogy: Mom's WWII Letters" - Nov 10

Thursday, June 6, 2019

Staff Sergeant Anthony J. Mucciarone, Jr. written by Angela Baker

I received the email in January, 2019:
"My name is Angela Baker. I am a Franklin resident who is currently a college junior majoring in history at George Washington University. I am presently enrolled in a class which is studying the impact of the D-Day invasion on individual communities and soldiers. For this class, I have been tasked with writing a biography of a soldier from Franklin who participated in the invasion and is buried in the Normandy American Cemetery"

Recently, Angela sent along a copy of her final paper to share:
"On June 6, 1944, one of the greatest, most ambitious, military operations in history occurred. In an effort to liberate France from German occupation and to save Europe from Hitler’s grasp, Allied troops landed at Normandy. It was the beginning of the end of a war spurred by tyranny and oppression, that had brought tragedy and grievous human suffering. Thousands would die in the operation, yet it allowed the Allies to begin their advance toward Germany, toward the end of the war, and toward peace. The men who participated in the operation could hardly know what lay ahead of them at the start of D-Day. This is the story of one of those men. This is the story of Staff Sergeant Anthony J. Mucciarone, Jr."
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B0wjbnXDBhczb3ZHbGlvQUNhdWw2Tk9ZWW40aWkycnVvYXZF/view?usp=sharing



Staff Sergeant Anthony J. Mucciarone, Jr.
A column on the Veterans Walkway for Staff Sergeant Anthony J. Mucciarone, Jr.


Tuesday, May 28, 2019

In the News: State starts planning for college closures; WWII MA Death records available online

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

State starts planning for college closures
"Higher education is dealing with its share of issues. The recent admissions scandal involving Hollywood celebrities, coupled with broader outrage against mounting student debt, has forced many colleges and universities to question their practices and futures. 
But a more insidious problem is weaving its way through higher education circles as well. A number of small colleges, including many in Massachusetts, have been forced to merge with larger institutions or close. What remains unclear is how the state will be affected by the closures and what state officials and lawmakers will do to protect students and employees. 
The abrupt closure of Mount Ida College in Newton last spring was the smoke that signaled a fire. With just a few weeks’ notice, the school left 280 faculty and staff without jobs and more than 1,000 students without a college to return to in the fall."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190527/state-education-officials-seek-to-head-off-college-closures

WWII MA Death records available online

"James Tarallia when as a private first class in the United States Army when he died of a gunshot wound on Sept.5, 1942 “at North Atlantic base.” 
“The first Framingham boy to lose his life in foreign service in this war,” reads the death record filed with the state of Massachusetts. He was born in 1919. 
Twenty days before the war ended in Europe, Robert A. Craddock of Milford died “in service in the European area.” A sergeant in the United States Army appears to be the last man from Milford to die in World War II. 
Taralli, who had lived at 50 Beaver St., Framingham, and Craddock, 83 Main St., Milford, can be found among hundreds of WWII death records of Massachusetts veterans now available online. The Secretary of State’s office released a digitized version of the records earlier this year, making it easy for people to comb through the index by name or by town online."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190527/states-world-war-ii-casualty-index-available-online

The digital archive can be found here
http://digitalarchives.sec.state.ma.us/uncategorised/collection_02102549-ad9c-458d-9d68-66e6f9a648b8/

The digital record for Timothy Hayes
The digital record for Sgt Timothy J Hayes

Sgt Timothy J Hayes
Sgt Timothy J Hayes

For more about Sgt Timothy J Hayes

Wednesday, December 19, 2018

One man's quest to find out about Sgt Timothy J Hayes

Sgt Timothy J Hayes
Sgt Timothy J Hayes
In the summer of 2013, one man walked among the graves in the American section of the cemetery in Normandy. He stopped at a grave and planted a small American flag. He wrote the name of the soldier's grave he had found in his notebook. When he returned home, he went to the internet to search for information on the soldier. 

He was fortunate. He found Sgt Timothy J Hayes in the search results.

Rose Turco had provided me the information on all the street signs that had been placed on the corners or in the Franklin neighborhoods where the soldiers had lived. The World War II Fallen Heroes project had taken place in 2011.

Sgt Hayes' sign was at the corner of Cross and Summer. I had posted the World War II information following VJ Day in August 2013. This is what the man, Trip Lewis, was able to find.

Trip Lewis is an American living and teaching in New Brunswick, Canada. He wrote in October 2013 to send me the photo of Sgt Hayes' grave and the flag he placed. He also had a chance to stop in Franklin in December 2013 as he was driving down the coast to visit family over the holidays. We met at the corner of Cross and Summer.

It was an overcast winter day but special. Trip and I met and chatted for a few minutes, took a couple of photos, and he headed back on the road.


Trip Lewis
Trip Lewis


Sgt Timothy J Hayes
Fallen Hero: Sgt Timothy J Hayes





I had not heard from Trip until this weekend when he wrote:
Dear Steve, 
We met almost 5 years ago in Franklin after I had contacted you about information that you had about a soldier from Franklin, Sergeant Timothy J Hayes that had died from wounds received on June 6, 1944, on Franklin Matters. I wanted to first again thank you for meeting me that Day in December 2013 - it was a special moment to stand under the sign on Cross Street in Franklin and learn more about Timothy Hayes. 
I am reaching out to you because I again had the opportunity to visit France this past July - and as part of our group’s itinerary, another visit to the Normandy American Cemetery. Though we had not planned it until the day before, I was able to do more than just visit Sgt Hayes this time and plant a flag at his grave - in fact, I ended up doing a short biography of him for the members of our group, teachers and students from across Canada, and introduce all of them to what I know about him and his service. 
I was able to record this on video (only recently having the time to get back and edit all of the video content from the trip); if you are interested in watching, the link to the video is provided. We also did a grave stone rubbing which I have brought home and framed.
Given your help in meeting me in Franklin back in 2013, I wanted to share this video with you - many thanks for your help. I hope someday to again visit Franklin!

Trip and Rose have been in contact via email so this story continues to develop.


The video:





More about the Gregg Centre can be found online
https://www.unb.ca/fredericton/arts/centres/gregg/

Sgt Hayes page (the original posting that Trip found)

http://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/fallen-hero-sergeant-timothy-j-hayes-us.html

The Fallen Heroes Series can be found
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/franklin-fallen-heroes-series.html

Sgt Timothy J Hayes is also honored with a post on the recently dedicated Veterans Walkwa
Sgt Timothy J Hayes is also honored with a post on the recently dedicated Veterans Walkway

Friday, December 7, 2018

"it wasn’t like a day at a picnic"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"It started out like the fragment of a dream, as the sleepers lay in their quiet beds. 
A distant rumble, somewhere. 
Waves breaking on the beaches, perhaps, white and pure like innocence. 
Or, no, a far-off, languid roll of thunder, tripping through the high clouds beginning to part as the recently risen sun poked its warm, dependable rays along the soaring rims of Wai’anae and Ko’olau."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20181207/remembering-pearl-harbor-franklin-women-recall-attack-homefront-life-as-us-entered-wwii


For more about Pearl Harbor and today's National Remembrance Day

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Fallen Heroes Series - Remembering

When I shared the picture from the Boston Sports Club to Facebook earlier this week, I realized that it was 'only' last year that I had posted the Fallen Heroes Series. Rhode Island, where I happen to be working, remains the only state to celebrate VJ Day or Victory Day, marking the end of World War II.





I also realized that there have been so many new subscribers in the past year that it would be worthwhile to re-share the link. So without further ado:

From wikipedia:
Although September 2 is the designated V-J Day in the entire United States, the event is recognized as an official holiday only in the U.S. state of Rhode Island, where the holiday's official name is "Victory Day",[20] and it is observed on the second Monday of August. There have been several attempts in the 1980s and 1990s to eliminate or rename the holiday on the grounds that it is discriminatory. While those all failed, the Rhode Island General Assembly did pass a resolution in 1990 "stating that Victory Day is not a day to express satisfaction in the destruction and death caused by nuclear bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki."[21] It is instead commemorative of those who fought, as Rhode Island sent a significantly above-average percentage of its population into the Pacific theater.    
To recognize the Franklin Fallen heroes from World War II, I'll be sharing their information this week. 
Thanks to Rose Turco for putting it together to recognize them and for allowing me to share this with you.


What is the Fallen Heroes Series?
A description of each of the street signs that are found around Franklin to acknowledge the individual who lived near there and gave his life in either World War II or the Vietnam War.


Cpl John J Kell - Raymond St
Cpl John J Kell - Raymond St

Note: There have been some additions to the signs to recognize those individuals from Afghanistan and Iraq but their info is not included in here at this time.



You can find the complete listing here

http://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/franklin-fallen-heroes-series.html


Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Remember today

Feb 19 is a special day in US history. It was the day that the Battle of Iwo Jima started in 1945. The flag raising on Mt Suribachi is quite well known. That the battle fought for many days after the flag raising is less so.

Additional information:
Battle of Iwo Jima (wikipedia entry)

To the Shores of Iwo Jima (vintage video)

Iwo Jima Monument in Arlington, VA
Iwo Jima Monument in Arlington, VA

If you see a veteran, thank them for their service.

If you find a World War II veteran, listen to a story if they'll tell it. We are all losing too many of those these days.





Note: My father was part of the 4th Marine Division that landed on Iwo Jima on Feb 19th and was one of the lucky ones to walk off in March. I was able to capture part of his oral history and you can listened to him talk of his unit, the Join Assault Signal Company here:
http://jerrysherlockstory.blogspot.com/2007/09/jerry-story-joint-assault-signal.html


Sunday, January 12, 2014

Who is that Franklin veteran?

You had a bunch of fun around the holidays as we played "Where in Franklin?" The Historical Museum has a new set of photos of World War II veterans that they are trying to identify.
The museum has many veterans photos we are trying to identify. Some names we know, many we don't. But we are looking for more than a name. Take a look at this first collection of photos, do you recognize an Uncle, Grandfather, Father, friend? Let us know their name and tell us a story, share a memory. Help us honor these men and their lives. While perusing the photos you'll may see a front porch you recognize, you'll see some great shots of vintage autos and views of uptown from the 40's. Leave your comment under a specific photo and contact us with any questions.
A sample of one of the many photos to review and identify

Go to Facebook to identify this individual
Go to Facebook to identify this individual

Go to the Facebook page to view and comment on the photos you can identify.
Click through to Facebook here

Monday, November 18, 2013

"Not a bad day’s work"


On April 14, 1945, Army Pfc. Howard Crawford stood atop a hill in western Germany, his only weapon a small "pea" gun, his only company the two German soldiers he had just startled in the brush. 
The 21-year-old Maine native had been sent up the hill to look for lumber, and had been given a comrade’s smaller gun to make his task easier. Now, he found himself pointing the "tiny" weapon at two enemies, his life hanging in the balance of what was to unfold in the next few moments. 
"We stood there and stared each other down for what seemed like eternity," Crawford said. "Finally, they dropped their guns."

Read more: http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/news/x915445589/WWII-JOURNAL-Outgunned-Franklins-Howard-Crawford-captured-two-Germans#ixzz2kzc1ysea

The honey that Howard sells is real good. It is available at the Akin-Bak Farm on RT 140 near the intersection with Beaver St.   http://www.akinbakfarmllc.com/


Friday, August 23, 2013

Fallen Heroes - Booklet

The booklet available for those attending the ceremony to unveil the street signs on May 15, 2011 marking the Fallen Heroes can be viewed here:





I'll second the acknowledgements listed on the back cover and especially to Rose Turco for allowing me access to this material to share here.

Many thanks!



Aviation Radioman 2C John W. Wyllie, Jr., U.S. Navy

Aviation Radioman Second Class John W. Wyllie, Jr., son of John and Elizabeth Wyllie, was born on December 4, 1922. John lived with his parents and two sisters at 460 Washington Street. John attended the Franklin Public Schools and was a graduate of Franklin High School Class of 1941. 
Aviation Radioman 2C John W. Wyllie, Jr. was in the service for 3 years during which he saw extensive combat flight duty in the various invasions in the South Pacific. 
Aviation Radioman 2C John Wyllie had completed 11 months of combat duty in the South Pacific and was scheduled to go overseas again. In August of 1945, while on an authorized Navy patrol bomber training flight, John lost his life as the bomber exploded in midair and crashed into the sea 20 miles southwest of San Diego, CA. 
Aviation Radioman 2C John W. Wyllie, Jr., U.S. Navy was 22 years old at the time of his death while in the service of his country during World War II.

FH_Wyllie
Fallen Hero: RM 2C Wyllie

For the full series of Fallen Heroes you can visit this link
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/franklin-fallen-heroes-series.html




Thursday, August 22, 2013

Fallen Hero: Second Lieutenant John A. Schur, U.S. Army Air Corps

Second Lieutenant John A. Schur was born on July 26, 1922, the son of Mr. and Mrs. August Schur. John lived at 124 Beaver Street with his parents while attending the Franklin Public Schools. John graduated from Franklin High School in 1940 as Class Valedictorian. John was also very active in scouting and attained the rank of Eagle Scout. 
Following graduation from high school, John entered Northeastern University to study chemical engineering and was on the Dean’s List for his 3 years there. John left Northeastern to enlist in the U.S. Air Corps on October 17, 1942. 
In raids over Tokyo Second Lieutenant Schur was highly commended for his outstanding ability and courage when he left his post as navigator to repair and put back into operation radio and radar equipment which had become inoperable during the flight. In a later raid over Tokyo, 2nd LT John H. Schur was aboard a B-25 bomber loaded with bombs when the bomber sustained a direct hit and disappeared in a burst of an explosion over the heart of the city on March 10, 1945. 
Second Lieutenant John A. Schur, U.S. Army Air Corps, was 22 years old at the time of his death over Tokyo while serving his country during World War II.

FH_Schur
Fallen Hero: Second Lt Schur


For the full series of Fallen Heroes you can visit this link
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/franklin-fallen-heroes-series.html



Fallen Hero: Private First Class Marshall E. Rollins, U.S. Marine Corps

Private First Class Marshall E. Rollins, the son of Carl and Bessie Rollins, was born on May 23, 1925. Marshall lived with his parents and sister at 51 Crescent Street. 
Marshall E. Rollins attended Franklin High School but left high school at the end of his junior year to join the Marine Corps. 
Private First Class Marshall Rollins served in the Fourth Marine Division for nearly three years, participating in the Battles of Roi, Namur, Tinian, Saipan and Iwo Jima. His division received a Presidential Unit Citation for their efforts in the Saipan battle. PFC Marshall Rollins sustained an injury in this battle but later returned to active duty on Iwo Jima. 
Private First Class Marshall E. Rollins was severely injured on March 10, 1945 in the fighting at Iwo Jima, was evacuated to the U.S. Hospital in the Mariannas and subsequently succumbed to his battle injuries in the Guam Hospital on April 2, 1945. 
Private First Class Marshall E. Rollins, U.S. Marine Corps, was 19 years old at the time of his death while serving in the service of his country in World War II.


FH_Rollins
Fallen Hero: Private First Class Rollins


For the full series of Fallen Heroes you can visit this link
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/franklin-fallen-heroes-series.html


Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Fallen Hero: Private Jules E. Perret, U.S. Army

Private Jules E. Perret, U.S. Army, was born on November 12, 1907 son of Jules and Maria Perret. Jules lived with his parents and three sisters at 29 Washington Street. 
Jules was a well known sportsman who enjoyed hunting and fishing. For many years he was an active member and tireless worker of the Franklin Rod and Gun Club. He did much towards the construction of the then new club house at Uncas Pond. Before volunteering to go into the service, Jules worked as a weaver in Canton, MA. 
Jules entered the service on October 12, 1943 and trained at Camp Croft, South Carolina. Pvt Jules E. Perret went overseas in March of 1944, first seeing action in North Africa and later serving in Italy where he met his death on August 15, 1944 in a vehicular accident. 
Pvt Jules E. Perret, U.S. Army, was 36 years old at the time of his death while serving his country in World War II.

FH_Perrett
Fallen Hero: Private Perret


For the full series of Fallen Heroes you can visit this link
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/franklin-fallen-heroes-series.html



Fallen Hero: First Lieutenant Gerald M. Parmenter, U.S. Army Air Corps

First Lieutenant Gerald M. Parmenter, son of Ernest and Maud Parmenter, was born on October 18, 1917. Gerald lived at 466 King Street with his parents and a twin brother. He attended the Franklin Public Schools and was graduated from Franklin High School in 1935 and from Hill College in Woonsocket in 1937. Gerald did accounting work at local businesses and was associated with his father at the Red Mount Poultry Farm here in Franklin. 
Prior to the war Gerald, who was very enthusiastic about aviation, obtained his license as a civilian pilot. Gerald enlisted in the Army Air Corp in August of 1942 and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in 1943 at Yuma, Arizona. First Lieutenant Parmenter served as a pilot in the air transport ferrying command, piloting planes built in this country to the British Government in Nassau. 
First Lieutenant Gerald M. Parmenter died from injuries received in an air crash while in the line of duty near Ramsar, India in the Asiastic Theatre. 
First Lieutenant Gerald M. Parmenter was 26 years old at the time of his death on July 17, 1944 while serving his country during WWII.


FH_Parmenter
Fallen Hero: First Lieutenant Parmenter

For the full series of Fallen Heroes you can visit this link
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/franklin-fallen-heroes-series.html




Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Fallen Hero: Staff Sergeant Anthony J. Mucciarone, Jr., U.S. Army

Staff Sergeant Anthony J. Mucciarone, Jr., U.S. Army, was born on July 28, 1924 son of Anthony, Sr. and Vera Mucciarone. Anthony lived at 31 Cleveland Avenue with his parents, two brothers and one sister. Anthony attended the Franklin Public Schools ,was a member of the Franklin High School class of 1942 but left high school at the end of his junior year. Anthony entered the army on April 23, 1943. 
Staff Sgt Anthony J. Mucciarone, Jr. rose in rank from buck private to staff sergeant in two months and was awarded a citation for personal and group heroism for his combat participation with the invasion forces in Normandy, commencing on June 6, 1944. He was a member of the 29th Infantry Division which captured St. Lo after almost continuous combat since its landing in Normandy on D-Day. Staff Sgt Anthony J. Mucciarone, Jr. was also a member of the 116th regiment of the 29th which successfully attacked a heavily fortified and strongly defended beach in the vicinity of Vievill-sur-Mer. The Corps Commander cited the 29th’s repeated “personal and group heroism and its unflagging devotion to duty which overcame discomfiture, fatigue and determined resistance of a resourceful enemy.” 
Staff Sgt Anthony J. Mucciarone, Jr. died in combat in France on July 30, 1944 at age 20 years. Anthony rests eternally in the Normandy American Cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer, France.

FH_Mucciarone
Fallen Hero: Staff Sgt Mucciarone


For the full series of Fallen Heroes you can visit this link
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/franklin-fallen-heroes-series.html




Fallen Hero: Private Daniel E. McCahill, U.S. Army

Private Daniel E. McCahill, U. S. Army, was born on June 11, 1919, son of Bernard and Mary McCahill. Daniel lived with his parents, three brothers and two sisters at 13 Pinehurst Street. 
Daniel attended the Franklin Schools and graduated from Franklin High School in 1938. He was a fine athlete affectionately known as “long Dan” or “big Dan” who played a hard fast brand of basketball. Dan continued his basketball play in an independent league after high school. 
Daniel answered his country’s call on March 21, 1941 and after a period of training with the 182nd infantry division was sent to the South Pacific war zone. Private Daniel McCahill was killed in action on November 11, 1942 at the Battle of Guadacanal. This campaign is well known for its pivotal role in turning the tide of the war in favor of the Allies in the Pacific Theatre. 
Pvt Daniel E. McCahill was 23 years old at the time of his death while engaged in combat fighting to recapture Guadacanal in World War II.

FH_McCahill
Fallen Hero: Private McCahill


For the full series of Fallen Heroes you can visit this link
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/franklin-fallen-heroes-series.html




Monday, August 19, 2013

Fallen Hero: Private Charles E. Mason, U.S. Army

Private Charles E. Mason, U.S. Army Signal Corps, was born on February 24, 1916, son of Fred and Minta Mason. Charles lived at 62 Pleasant Street with his parents and sister. Charles attended the Franklin Public Schools graduating from Franklin High School in 1934. During his high school years, he participated in the Memorial Day ceremonies on the Common by reciting the Gettysburg Address. 
Prior to entering the army, Charles was a member of a Naval Reserve Unit located here in Franklin and served under the command of Fred Cook. David Bullukian, another one of our Fallen 23, also served in this Franklin unit. 
Charles attended Boston Radio and Television School prior to his induction in July of 1941. PVT Charles Mason used this special interest in ham radios and used this skill to converse with people in the area while in the army. 
Private Charles E. Mason died of injuries received in an automobile accident at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey on December 28, 1941 at the age of 25.

FH_Mason
Fallen Hero: Private Mason



For the full series of Fallen Heroes you can visit this link
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/franklin-fallen-heroes-series.html


Fallen Hero: Ensign William O. Martello, U.S. Navy

Ensign William Olindo Martello, U.S. Navy, was born on April 14, 1920, son of Theresa and Olindo Martelli. Willam was raised by Theresa and her second husband, Nicholas Martello, at 17 Howard Street with his four sisters and one brother. “Willie” attended the Franklin Schools and graduated from Franklin High School in 1937. William went on to Boston University where he graduated with honors with an A.B. degree and was initiated into Phi Beta Kappa. 
William Martello was a student, artist and musician as well as a fighting man. “Willie” was an accomplished concert pianist and was rated as one of the most promising young pianists in New England. Prior to his naval service “Lindy” traveled on the Grace cruise line to South American as an onboard pianist. 
William O. Martello enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserves on April 17, 1942 and later began his active naval service on April 8, 1943. William O. Martello attended Columbia’s naval officers training program and was commissioned an ensign upon completion of the program on July 28, 1943. He served as second in command aboard an invasion craft off the coast of the Anzio beachhead below Rome. Survivors of Ensign Martello’s landing craft, which had struck a mine in the waters off Anzio, reported that Ensign Martello had refused to heed the order to abandon ship, had fitted out a life raft with provisions, and when last seen, just as the ship turned over and went down, was hurling life belts into the sea for his crewmen swimming in the water. 
A month before his death Ensign William O. Martello wrote to his mother the following lines in a letter to her: 
“As for the war, we had to adjust ourselves to the personal problems it brought, and if a guy can’t take it, then his life is a failure. That is why I am not even afraid of death. If I did one thing that indicated cowardness, the rest of my life would be miserable.” 
Ensign William O. Martello, U.S. Navy, was lost at sea off Anzio on January 26, 1944 at the age of 23.

FH_Martello
Fallen Hero: Ensign Martello


For the full series of Fallen Heroes you can visit this link
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/franklin-fallen-heroes-series.html



Sunday, August 18, 2013

Fallen Hero: Technical Sergeant Baldo S. Lazzerini, U.S. Army

Technical Sgt Baldo S. Lazzerini was born on January 29, 1913 in Franklin son of Quinto and Julia Lazzerini. Baldo made his home here in Franklin from age 16 with the Pacifico and Amelia Gianetti Family of 57 Hutchinson Street. Baldo’s active duty began upon his enlistment on March 20, 1941. 
Technical Sergeant Baldo S. Lazzerini served with the U.S. 5th Army, G-2 Intelligence service in Italy as an interpreter for General Mark Clark. T/Sgt Lazzerini was involved in the heaviest of fighting in Italy and had personally witnessed the surrender of Italian generals to Allied generals, with whose staff he was connected. T/Sgt Baldo Lazzerini’s brilliance in military operations, coupled with his knowledge of the Italian language gave him rapid rise in rank. 
T/Sgt Baldo S. Lazzerini died as a result of a military vehicle accident in Italy on June 24, 1945. 
Technical Sgt Baldo S. Lazzerini was 32 years old at the time of his death in service during World War II.


FH_Lazzerini
Fallen Hero: T/Sgt Lazzerini


For the full series of Fallen Heroes you can visit this link
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2013/08/franklin-fallen-heroes-series.html