Showing posts with label college. Show all posts
Showing posts with label college. Show all posts

Tuesday, February 22, 2022

Franklin High School Baseball alumni ready for their spring collegiate season

Catching up to share this tweet from Franklin High School Baseball, MA (@FHSCoachZBrown):
2-18-22 - College Baseball is officially back! 
For those that would like to follow the 14 FHS ⚾️ alums that are currently on active college rosters please see the list below. 
Nothing better than checking the box scores & seeing our alums contributing to their collegiate programs! 
https://t.co/wcYRABPHY6

Shared from Twitter: https://twitter.com/FHSCoachZBrown/status/1494669514235166722

Franklin High School Baseball alumni ready for their spring collegiate season
Franklin High School Baseball alumni ready for their spring collegiate season

Tuesday, November 23, 2021

Job Search Event for Recent College Graduates

Via Ed Lawrence:

In addition to my library, outplacement, and Mass Council on Aging work, I partner with my town's Natick Service Council to assist local residents. Here is a flyer for an upcoming workshop.

Please share this info with any person you feel could benefit.

The Brack Center is thrilled to host another workshop for recent or upcoming college graduates to discuss how to be successful in the workplace.

Transitioning from school life to a career can be surprisingly difficult.

There are some obvious and less than obvious things that you can do in your job that will help you get through the initial learning curve, kickstart your career, and ensure your success.

Join our managers and HR experts on Wednesday December 1st at 3:00 PM to hear their advice on what you can do to accelerate career development and what missteps to avoid. 


Job Search Event for Recent College Graduates
Job Search Event for Recent College Graduates

Thursday, September 9, 2021

Washington Post: "Study sessions, parties and dorm life: How college students can minimize COVID risk on campus"

"College students across the nation are back on campus, bracing for another tumultuous semester amid the spread of the highly contagious delta variant of the coronavirus.

And as their universities grapple with mask recommendations, vaccine mandates and distancing rules, students are charged with making serious health-related decisions. Health experts have some risk-reduction advice to make those tough calls a little easier.

One health expert said that while no public health precaution is 100 percent effective, layering them offers a solid defense against covid-19, the disease caused by the virus.

“I tell folks: ‘Think of the vaccine like a really good raincoat, but if it’s storming outside, you still need an umbrella if you want to stay dry,’ ” said Henry Wu, assistant professor and senior physician at the Emory University School of Medicine. “And I think right now, we’re storming in most of the country.”
Continue reading the article online. (Subscription maybe required) 
Dean College students are back on campus in Franklin
Dean College students are back on campus in Franklin

Monday, August 23, 2021

MA Dept of Higher Ed: strengthening campus response to sexual assault

MA Dept of Higher Ed (@MassDHE) tweeted Fri, Aug 20, 2021:
"As students return to campus, MA has a new law on the books to strengthen campus response to sexual assault. Details in the new DHE Forward: https://t.co/Hkp01vY9me "

Shared from Twitter: https://twitter.com/MassDHE/status/1428780159465836549?s=03


As students return to campus, MA has a new law on the books to strengthen campus response to sexual assault
As students return to campus, MA has a new law on the books to strengthen campus response to sexual assault

Wednesday, June 16, 2021

State Rep Roy: What's happening in the district - June 2021 newsletter


Offshore wind announcement

Last month, we celebrated the approval of Vineyard Wind, the first large-scale offshore wind project in the United States. Rep. Roy was honored to join with state officials and the Vineyard Wind team for the announcement at the Wind Technology Test Center in Charlestown. The is the first step in a major effort to fight climate change and create jobs in the process. Speaker Ron Mariano has made offshore wind a priority for Massachusetts, part of the goal to make Massachusetts a regional hub of the industry.

This project enables Massachusetts to realize the ambitious offshore wind energy goals the Legislature set in 2016 and 2021 and brings us closer to our vision of a thriving offshore wind sector here in Massachusetts. It will power hundreds of thousands of homes while helping us attain our emissions reduction goals. It will also boost our economy, reduce electricity rates, and create thousands of local clean energy jobs that will be here to stay.


Copyright (C) 2021 State Rep Jeff Roy. All rights reserved.

You are receiving this email because you either contacted our office or indicated you wanted to keep updated on the 10th Norfolk District and things going on at the State House.

State Rep Jeff Roy
State House Room 43
Boston, MA 02133

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Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Boston Globe: "Becker College to close this spring as pandemic deals final blow, officials say"

"Becker College, a small, private liberal arts school in Worcester, will close after the end of this school year, the board of trustees announced Monday.

The school, best known for its veterinary, nursing, and video game design programs, has struggled financially for years and trustees said the COVID-19 pandemic, which hurt enrollment and brought added costs, dealt the final blow.

“Ultimately, the impacts of COVID-19 turned what was a very challenging situation into an unsustainable situation,” President Nancy P. Crimmin said in a statement from the school, which had said it was on the brink of closure earlier this month."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Washington Post: "Meet the Cal cross-country runner who wants to dismantle the NCAA"

From The Washington Post, an article of interest for Franklin:

"In spring 2019, Andrew Cooper and some other Pac-12 athletes arrived at a high-end resort in Phoenix. Ten pools and a golf course surrounded them on the scenic property. Cooper, a cross-country runner from Washington State, attended this event during which administrators were supposed to listen to athletes.

During one session, Kate Fagan, the author of a book about a college runner who died by suicide, addressed mental health and how colleges could better serve athletes. The year prior, Cooper watched how quarterback Tyler Hilinski’s death by suicide rocked his campus community. Cooper called Fagan’s discussion “one of the most powerful mental health talks I’ve ever witnessed.” But he remembers the stark juxtaposition in the room. Athletes cried while some administrators continued working on their laptops.

“It just made me realize they don't care,” Cooper said. “They don't actually care about us. This is only going to change from the outside.”
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required) 
https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2020/09/22/andrew-cooper-dismantle-ncaa/

Andrew Cooper, who ran cross-country for Washington State and California Berkeley, has become an advocate for college athlete rights. (Mitch Hechsel)
Andrew Cooper, who ran cross-country for Washington State and California Berkeley, has become an advocate for college athlete rights. (Mitch Hechsel)


Thursday, August 27, 2020

In the News: State Rep Roy would address early college; Franklin Fire Dept receives grant

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

State Rep Roy would make early college “one of my priorities"

"Highlighting new data showing greater academic success among high school students who take college courses, education experts called Wednesday for Massachusetts to continue investing in early college programs and broaden access to thousands more students. 
The early college courses available at roughly three dozen high schools have made a sizable impact on closing achievement gaps and improving equitable outcomes for students, analysts found in a study released by the Baker administration. Students who participated in the programs are enrolling in higher education at a rate 20 percentage points higher than their school and state peers, the Department of Higher Education said. 
Enrollment was more than 2,300 in 2020 and is projected to reach 4,200 students in fiscal year 2021, and proponents want to ensure that Massachusetts reaches a long-term goal nearly four times as high. Getting 16,000 students to participate, they said, would make major progress toward improving access to higher education for families that might view it as unaffordable." 
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

Commonwealth Magazine has an article on this topic also


Franklin Fire Dept receives grant
"Several area police and fire departments have received federal grants for pandemic-related needs. 
Although the money is from the federal Coronvirus Emergency Supplemental Funding Program, the grants were awarded through the Baker-Polito administration. 
“These awards to municipal departments and state agencies throughout the commonwealth demonstrate our commitment to providing police officers, firefighters and other public safety personnel with the necessary tools to effectively serve their communities while continuing to fight the pandemic,” Gov. Charlie Baker said in a statement. 
The money is meant to be used to prevent, prepare and respond to coronavirus-related issues. The maximum grant amount was $50,000."

  • Franklin Fire Department, $48,724 for mobile data terminals

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

Franklin Fire Dept receives grant
Franklin Fire Dept receives grant


Thursday, July 30, 2020

"More Than 6,300 Coronavirus Cases Have Been Linked to U.S. Colleges"

From the New York Times, an article of interest for Franklin:
"As college students and professors decide whether to head back to class, and as universities weigh how and whether to reopen, the coronavirus is already on campus.

A New York Times survey of every public four-year college in the country, as well as every private institution that competes in Division I sports or is a member of an elite group of research universities, revealed at least 6,300 cases tied to about 270 colleges over the course of the pandemic. And the new academic year has not even begun at most schools."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/07/28/us/covid-19-colleges-universities.html

Thursday, April 30, 2020

In the News: “We can’t just pretend everything is normal when we go back to school”

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

At-home schooling brings added challenges for special education students and parents
"Alexis Forgit, a Milford High School special education teacher, said some of her pupils have been automatically putting their backpacks on in the morning, not understanding why they are not going to school.

Several weeks ago, Alysia Butler’s sons could step out of class if they felt overwhelmed. One-on-one paraprofessionals, shared aides, behaviorists and other support staff helped them navigate the tough situations that would surface throughout the day.

Class has since shifted onto the online video-conferencing app Zoom in wake of the coronavirus. For the four boys and other children on the autism spectrum, the video calls can be draining.

“Fifteen minutes in, they have to check out,” said Butler, of Hopedale. “They can’t do that (on a Zoom call). You are expected to be there and present.”
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20200429/for-metrowest-special-education-teachers-and-parents-at-home-schooling-brings-added-challenges


UMass Medical School to furlough 100 employees
"UMass Medical School plans to furlough 100 employees for up to six months in an effort to rein in costs amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

The school announced the move in an internal memo on Wednesday.

The furloughed workers account for nearly 2% of the medical school’s workforce of around 6,000 employees. They could be brought back sooner than six months, and will still receive their health care coverage while they are furloughed, according to school spokeswoman Sarah Willey.

The furloughs are expected to go into effect next week. Willey did not have any information on Wednesday about which departments would be affected; Wednesday’s memo said they would happen “across all business units.”

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20200429/umass-medical-school-to-furlough-100-employees

In the conversation with State Rep Jeff Roy shared here recently, we talked of his concern for the higher education institutions who were facing financial and demographic challenges before the pandemic came. UMass Medical was the first of three stops made in Worcester on the day I was fortunate to join him for his tour of all 29 higher ed state schools.

Listen to our conversation here
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/04/fm-255-state-representative-jeffrey-roy.html

 
State Rep Jeff Roy in one of the UMass Medical classroom with an interactive system of the body
State Rep Jeff Roy in one of the UMass Medical classroom with an interactive system of the body

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

In the News: college refund plans monitored; delay of local elections due to COVID-19

From the Milford Daily News, an article of interest for Franklin:

Monitoring of college refund plans amid coronavirus underway

"With many college students now learning remotely off-campus or while living with their families, refunding the room and board payments for those students while they’re away is going to be a “huge issue,” according to the House chair of the Higher Education Committee.

But, state Rep. Jeffrey Roy said, it’s not one where there’s necessarily an across-the-board solution.

The new online learning surge is one of the cascading effects flowing from the coronavirus pandemic, and it’s being driven by the fact that thousands of students were abruptly sent packing from campuses mid-semester.

Massachusetts is home to more than 100 colleges and universities, including the state’s 15 community colleges, which do not have on-campus housing, nine public universities and the five-campus University of Massachusetts system.

Dorm and meal payments are unique to each school, and campus officials will need to consider the needs of their student populations as well as their own budgetary dynamics as they make unprecedented decisions around whether and how to reimburse room and board for off-campus time."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20200324/ag-roy-healey-monitoring-college-refund-plans-amid-coronavirus

MA allows delay of local elections due to COVID-19

"Towns can postpone local elections this spring to help residents avoid the coronavirus, thanks to a law signed Monday night by Gov. Charlie Baker.

Spring is local election season for towns throughout Massachusetts, and town officials have been keeping a wary eye on the trajectory of the pandemic as the time to cast ballots – not typically an action associated with worldwide social distancing recommendations – looms closer.

Elections scheduled on or before May 30 may be postponed, according to a notice from the Secretary of State’s Office, and ballots printed with the original date may be used. Elections must be held by June 30.

Several voting rights activists praised the idea, but criticized the law for not going far enough."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20200324/massachusetts-allows-delay-of-local-elections

Sunday, February 2, 2020

Franklin grad Olivia DiGiacomo represents JWU at Div. III Immersion Program

Franklin grad Olivia DiGiacomo:
"Competing in collegiate athletics opens a number of unique opportunities, not all of them on the field. Franklin grad Olivia DiGiacomo got to experience one of those opportunities last week, when she attended the annual NCAA convention in Anaheim, Calif. as part of the Div. III Immersion Program.

DiGiacomo, a junior outfielder on the Johnson & Wales University softball team, was nominated for the program by her softball coach Kim Camara-Harvey and director of athletics Dana Garfield. She was one of 40 Div. III student-athletes selected from thousands of nominees nationwide to join the program and attend the convention.

“My coach and my athletic director looked at me as a leader and someone who can bring back a lot of information and knowledge back to campus,” said DiGiacomo after she got back from the convention. “It was absolutely a gratifying experience to be recognized.”
Continue reading the write up by Josh Perry, Managing Editor of HockomockSports.co: 
https://hockomocksports.com/franklins-olivia-digiacomo-represents-jwu-at-ncaa-convention/ 

Franklin alum Olivia DiGiacomo represented Johnson & Wales University at the NCAA Convention as one of 40 student-athletes selected from a national pool to take part in the DIII Immersion Program. (JWU Athletics)
Franklin alum Olivia DiGiacomo represented Johnson & Wales University at the NCAA Convention as one of 40 student-athletes selected from a national pool to take part in the DIII Immersion Program. (JWU Athletics)
 

Sunday, January 19, 2020

"it’s definitely been quite a ride here"

Josh Perry, Managing Editor of HockomockSports.com, provides an update on the collegiate career of FHS grad, Ryan Spillane:

"Looking forward to his junior season at St. Anselm, Ryan Spillane was expecting to see a larger role for the Hawks. The former Franklin High standout had played in 23 games as a sophomore, scoring a pair of goals and recording three assists, and he had high hopes of even more ice time and even more production as a junior.

Unfortunately, a hamstring injury in September would cost Spillane the entire year. He has worked hard to not only get back on the ice but to become a regular contributor for a team with its sights set on bringing home the NE-10 title.

“By the beginning of the summer I was ready to get back on the ice and get in shape,” Spillane explained. “By the time the season came, I felt like I was ready to go, back in game shape like I was two years ago. It’s nice to be back on the ice.”

It is always hard for an athlete to sit and watch his team play, but Spillane praised his coaches, teammates, and the training staff at St. Anselm for keeping him involved and for getting him back on the ice for this season."

Continue reading about Ryan:
https://hockomocksports.com/franklins-ryan-spillane-skates-into-final-shift-at-st-as/


Former Franklin standout Ryan Spillane has battled back from an injury to have a strong senior season at St. Anselm. (St. Anselm Athletics)
Former Franklin standout Ryan Spillane has battled back from an injury to have a strong senior season at St. Anselm. (St. Anselm Athletics)

Friday, November 15, 2019

Governor Baker Signs Legislation to Support Financial Stability in Higher Education and Protect Students and Families from Abrupt Closures

Thursday, November 14, Governor Charlie Baker joined Lt. Governor Karyn Polito, Senate President Karen Spilka, Secretary of Education Jim Peyser, Senator Anne Gobi, Representative Jeff Roy, the Association of lndependent Colleges and Universities in Massachusetts (AICUM), and SEIU Local 509 to sign An Act to Support Improved Financial Stability in Higher Education (H4099) which will clarify and enhance the authority of the Board of Higher Education to monitor the financial health of Massachusetts' colleges and universities. 

This legislation requires any institution facing financial challenges that may jeopardize the institution's ability to fulfill its obligations to current and admitted students to notify the Board of Higher Education, as well as submit a contingency plan for approval that includes arrangements for students to complete their studies.

"Massachusetts is home to some of the world's most impressive public and private colleges and universities that also serve as major employers and drivers of business across the Commonwealth," said Governor Charlie Baker. "We are very pleased to have worked alongside the Legislature to sign this important bill into law that will protect students and families from sudden college closures, while also guaranteeing those institutions confidentiality as the Department of Higher Education works with them to understand their financial status."

"While we do not want to see any college or university close its doors, it is important to ensure sufficient notice to students and staff to make arrangements if the institution where they study or work is at high risk of closure, so they can complete their studies with as little disruption as possible, or have sufficient time to find new employment," said Lt. Governor Karyn Polito. "This legislation will better protect students, families and higher education professionals."

In March 2019, Governor Baker filed legislation to enhance the authority of the Board of Higher Education to monitor the financial health of Massachusetts' colleges and universities. Under this legislation, colleges and universities shall immediately notify the Board of Higher Education of any known financial liabilities or risks which are reasonably likely to result in the imminent closure of the institution, or negatively affect the institution's ability to fulfill its obligations to current or admitted students. The institution would be required to submit to the Board for approval a contingency plan that includes provisions for providing advance notice to students and staff.

"Through this legislation, the Board and Department of Higher Education can ensure transparency for students and families without being overly burdensome to colleges," said Education Secretary James Peyser.

"We're especially pleased to see the votes on this legislation passing the House and Senate unanimously in recent weeks," said Carlos E. Santiago, Commissioner of Higher Education. "It is a sign of the deep levels of support for our work to monitor institutional finances with the goal of making sure that all students have the ability to complete their programs of study and pursue meaningful careers of their choice."

"Massachusetts has a global reputation for excellence in higher education, and it1s essential for all of us to work together to sustain and burnish public confidence in our colleges and universities," said Chris Gabrieli, Chair of the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education.

The Board of Higher Education will be responsible for establishing an annual process for screening every college and university to assess its financial condition, and to identify any institution that may be at risk of imminent closure. The Department of Higher Education is encouraged to work with the regional accrediting agency to conduct these annual screenings, in lieu of doing the screening itself.

The Board of Higher Education will also establish a training program for members of boards of trustees of public institutions of higher education on the proper governance of an institution of higher education. The instruction will include an overview of open meeting, public records, state procurement laws and state finance provisions established under state law, along with fraud prevention and fiduciary responsibilities.

The legislation signed today paves the way for the Board of Higher Education to vote on regulations by which it will exercise its oversight authority, expected at its December Board meeting.

"I am proud we have taken this important step as a Commonwealth towards furthering transparency and providing stability in our higher education system," said Senate President Karen E. Spilka. "No student's degree aspirations or financial resources should ever be put in limbo due to the sudden closure of their school."

"Today we've taken action to protect students, families, and staff of our higher education institutions by increasing the transparency of the financial health of institutions - requiring stronger oversight, reporting and accountability," said House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo. "Thank you to the Higher Education Committee Chairs Jeffrey Roy and Anne Gobi for their diligent work on this legislation and for the support of House Ways and Means Chair Michlewitz and Representative Kenneth Gordon on these issues."

"In the wake of the Mount Ida closure last year, I heard from an extraordinary amount of people who were negatively affected and asked that the legislature take steps to protect students, faculty, and staff," said Senator Michael J. Rodrigues, Chair of the Senate Committee on Ways and Means. "I applaud the Baker-Polito Administration for supporting measures such as the development of student-focused contingency plans for public colleges and universities expected to close. This legislation will help to bring stability and transparency to our institutions of higher learning."

"Today is a good day for students, faculty, staff, and the Commonwealth," said Senator Anne M. Gobi, Senate Chair of the Joint Committee on Higher Education. "We have shown, in a bipartisan manner, that our institutions of higher learning are important and their stability is necessary. Through these efforts, if problems arise they can be detected early with a set, transparent process in place that will safeguard our students and offer them a path to continue their higher education.

"This is a great day for students and their families, and this legislation will provide transparency and restore confidence in our Higher Education institutions," said Representative Jeff Roy, House Chair of the Joint Committee on Higher Education. "The strength of our colleges and universities is paramount to our success as a commonwealth, as it promotes civic discourse and drives economic opportunity. When students and their families invest in their future, they deserve to know that their institution stands on a solid foundation. Through this legislation, the state will be a partner in providing transparency and accountability to promote resiliency and financial stability, and to ensure that our students have access to the opportunities that they need, that they can count on, and that deliver for the long-term strength of our state."

"We are fortunate to have vibrant private colleges across the Commonwealth that graduate tens of thousands of students each year who go on to contribute to the Massachusetts economy," said AICUM. "Today's legislation will help ensure that our colleges and universities continue to educate our students, employ our residents, further important research and enhance our host communities. I want to thank Governor Baker, Secretary Peyser, Commissioner Santiago, Senate President Spilka and House Speaker DeLeo for working collaboratively with AICUM to develop a process that utilizes the expertise and experience of the regional accrediting agency to annually screen our institutions and ensures confidentially to colleges and universities as they participate in the screening process."

 
Governor Baker Signs Legislation to Support Financial Stability in Higher Education
Governor Baker Signs Legislation to Support Financial Stability in Higher Education (Facebook photo via Rep Roy)

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

In the News: Franklin Police - no shave November; Assumption College to change to University

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Officers from Franklin, Hopedale, Medway, Bellingham, Millis and Upton police departments are participating in the Home Base No Shave campaign in support of Home Base, a Red Sox Foundation and Massachusetts General Hospital Program.

Traditionally, police departments have a grooming policy where officers must remain clean-shaven. However, for November, police officers have pledged $100 to forego the traditional grooming policy and grow beards, mustaches and goatees to support Home Base and its mission to provide no-cost clinical care to Veterans and Military Families impacted by the invisible wounds, such as post-traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury.

The movement is spearheaded by MBTA Transit Police and Boston Gang Unit Detective Kurt Power, a U.S. Army Veteran and Purple Heart recipient who sought care for his own invisible wounds at Home Base."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20191112/area-police-departments-to-participate-in-home-base-no-shave-campaign

Ben Franklin and the Franklin Police Department are once again participating in No Shave November
"Ben Franklin and the Franklin Police Department are once again participating in No Shave November"




"Assumption College received approval from the state to become a university and will do so next year, according to an internal memo school leadership sent on Wednesday.

In that message, President Francesco Cesareo said Assumption’s Restructuring Implementation Committee will prepare for that “historic transition” over the next year.

“There’s a lot of work to be done before we can actually turn the switch,” he said in an interview with the Telegram & Gazette, including the development of a “unifying visual identity” for the renamed school, which enrolls around 2,500 students."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20191110/assumption-college-gets-states-approval-to-become-university

Find out more about Assumption at  https://www.assumption.edu/

Note: I graduated from Assumption College in 1976 with an English major and Education minor.

Sunday, November 10, 2019

Legislature Votes to Increase Transparency and Financial Reporting Requirements of Massachusetts Higher Education Institutions

On Wednesday (Nov 6), Representative Jeffrey N. Roy (D-Franklin), House Speaker Robert A. Deleo and Senate President Karen Spilka with their colleagues in the Massachusetts Legislature voted to pass legislation to enable the state to more closely monitor the financial health of Massachusetts private colleges and universities and provide transparency and security to students and families in the Commonwealth.

Known as an Act to Support Improved Financial Stability in Higher Education, the legislation requires higher education institutions to make public and accessible financial reports and requires any institution facing financial risk of closure to develop contingency plans to ensure a process is in place to assist and inform its students and other stakeholders. The legislation also establishes financial penalties on institutions for non-compliance with reporting and planning. The bill requires ethics and fiduciary training for higher education trustees and board members.

"No student's degree aspirations or financial resources should ever be put in limbo due to the sudden closure of their school," said Senate President Karen E. Spilka (D-Ashland). "I want to applaud the work of the Chairs of the Committee on Higher Education in advancing this legislation that brings stability and transparency to our higher education system. I look forward to it being swiftly signed into law."

"This legislation helps to protect students, families, and staff of our higher education institutions by increasing the transparency of the financial health of institutions - requiring increased oversight, reporting and accountability," said House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo, (D-Winthrop). "Thank you to Chair Jeffrey Roy and Chair Anne Gobi for their diligent work on these issues and for the support of Chair Michlewitz and Representative Kenneth Gordon."

"In the wake of the Mount Ida closure last year, I heard from an extraordinary amount of people who were negatively affected and asked that the legislature take steps to protect students, faculty and staff," said Senator Michael J. Rodrigues (D-Westport), Chair of the Senate Committee on Ways and Means. "By including new requirements, such as the development of student-focused contingency plans if a public college or university is expected to close, these measures will bring stability and transparency to our institutions of higher learning."

"I look forward to the Governor signing this important piece of legislation into law, said Senator Anne Gobi, Chair of Higher Education Committee (D-Spencer). "Just this week there is news of another Massachusetts college considering a merger, which punctuates the importance of having the law in place quickly to establish guidelines and give students, faculty, staff and the community a form of protection and security."

"By improving accountability and the financial stability of our colleges and universities, this legislation will ensure both institutes of higher education and our students will be better prepared for the future," said Representative Aaron Michlewitz, Chair of the House Committee on Ways & Means (D-Boston).

"It was a great day for students and their families as this legislation will provide transparency and restore confidence in our Higher Education institutions," said Representative Jeffrey N. Roy, Chair of the Higher Education Committee. "The strength of our colleges and universities is paramount to our success as a commonwealth; when students and their families invest in their future, they deserve to know that their institution stands on a solid foundation."

The four major provision of the bill address the following topics listed below.

• Financial reporting: Requires that all public higher education and independent institutions post on their websites a copy of the institution's financial report and a summary written in terms understandable by the general public.
• Financial screening: Enables the Board of Higher Education (BHE) to monitor the financial health of independent institutions of higher education in Massachusetts.
o Requires an independent institution to immediately notify BHE of any known financial liabilities or risks likely that may result in closure.
o Requires BHE to establish a process to annually assess each institution's financial information to identify any institution it deems may be at risk of imminent closure. The BHE will keep confidential those assessments for independent institutions unless it is determined an institution is at risk of closure.
o Financial screenings may be conducted by an accrediting agency authorized by the U.S. Department of Education, or the Department of Higher Education.
o An institution determined to be at risk of imminent closure must prepare a contingency plan for closure, which includes a process to provide notice to a variety of stakeholders including, students, faculty, staff, pending applicants, and host communities. The closure plan must also include:
• arrangements for students to complete their program of study;
• a plan for the maintenance of student records; and,
• a plan to provide funding for refunding any student deposits and for the cost of protecting and maintaining student records.
• Enforcement: Requires penalties for failure to comply with financial screening requirements, which include fines of up to $1,000 per day, suspension of any state funds, or the suspension or revocation of any degree granting authority.

• Board training: Requires comprehensive training programs for members of the boards of trustees of the state's public higher education institutions on the proper governance, financial metrics, open meeting law and their legal and fiduciary responsibilities, at least once every four years.

Having been passed by the House and Senate, the legislation now goes to Governor Baker for his signature.

 
Worcester State students pose with members of the Higher Education committee before touring the WSC campus on Friday, Nov 1
Worcester State students pose with members of the Higher Education committee before touring the WSC campus on Friday, Nov 1

Friday, October 4, 2019

House Votes to Increase Transparency and Financial Reporting Requirements of Massachusetts Higher Education Institutions

Today the Massachusetts House of Representatives voted to pass legislation that will enable the state to more closely monitor the financial health of Massachusetts private colleges and universities and provide transparency and security to students and families in the Commonwealth.

Known as an Act to Support Improved Financial Stability in Higher Education, the legislation requires higher education institutions to make public and accessible financial reports and requires any institution facing financial risk of closure to develop contingency plans to ensure a process is in place to assist and inform its students and other stakeholders. The legislation also establishes financial penalties on institutions for non-compliance with reporting and planning. The bill requires ethics and fiduciary training for higher education trustees and board members.

“This legislation will increase the transparency of the financial health of our public institutions of higher education requiring increased oversight, reporting and accountability to protect students, families, and staff,” said House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo, (D-Winthrop). “I’m proud of the work Chair Jeffrey Roy has done to lead this effort with the support of Chair Aaron Michlewitz and Representative Kenneth Gordon.”

“Today the House took a step on improving accountability and the financial stability at our colleges and universities,” said Representative Aaron Michlewitz, Chair of the House Committee on Ways & Means (D-Boston). “By enacting this legislation both our institutes of higher education and our students will be better prepared for the worst case scenario.”

“This legislation supports and strengthens our higher education system and these vital engines of opportunity, and in so doing, protects the interests of students and families,” said Representative Jeffrey Roy, Chair of the Higher Education Committee (D-Franklin). “The financial screening and enhanced reporting provisions will help us keep Massachusetts at the top of the heap and avoid the significant negative consequences of college closures for students, staff, and host communities. The training provisions will strengthen the governance of these institutions and assist boards in exercising their fiduciary responsibilities.”

The four major provision of the bill address the following topics listed below.
  • Financial reporting: Requires that all public higher education and independent institutions post on their websites a copy of the institution’s financial report and a summary written in terms understandable by the general public.
  • Financial screening: Enables the Board of Higher Education (BHE) to monitor the financial health of independent institutions of higher education in Massachusetts.
o Requires an independent institution to immediately notify BHE of any known financial liabilities or risks likely that may result in closure.
o Requires BHE to annually conduct a financial screening of each institution and identify any institution it deems may be at risk of imminent closure. The BHE will keep confidential those assessments for independent institutions unless it is determined an institution is at risk of closure.
o The BHE may accept the results of an annual financial screening conducted by an accrediting agency authorized by the U.S. Department of Education.
o An institution determined to be at risk of imminent closure must prepare a contingency plan for closure, which includes a process to provide notice to a variety of stakeholders including, students, faculty, staff, pending applicants, and host communities. The closure plan must also include:
  • arrangements for students to complete their program of study;
  • a plan for the maintenance of student records; and,
  • provide funding for refunding any student deposits and for the cost of protecting and maintaining student records.
  • Enforcement: Requires penalties for failure to comply with financial screening requirements, which include fines of up to $1,000 per day, suspension of any state funds, or the suspension or revocation of any degree granting authority.
  • Board training: Requires comprehensive training programs for members of the boards of trustees of the state’s public higher education institutions on the proper governance, financial metrics, open meeting law and their legal and fiduciary responsibilities, at least once every four years.
The bill now goes to the Senate.

 https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Tj68l91NCpAWqOUlp6FcrgyVtct8twrE/view?usp=sharing

Monday, July 22, 2019

In the News: college students not aware of SNAP benefits available

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Hunger is a problem for some college students in MetroWest, and there’s a federal program that could help them.

However, a recent study shows millions of students are potentially missing out on the program, because they either don’t know about it or the eligibility rules are too complicated to understand.

The program is the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program.

Nearly two million college students didn’t receive SNAP benefits in 2016, even though they were potentially eligible, according to a December 2018 study by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), an independent, nonpartisan agency that works for Congress. The report recommended the U.S. Department of Agriculture improve its efforts to clarify SNAP eligibility requirements, and make them more accessible."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190721/college-students-going-hungry-many-miss-out-on-snap-benefits

Visit the SNAP web page for additional info on benefits
https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program
https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program
https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program

Tuesday, May 28, 2019

In the News: State starts planning for college closures; WWII MA Death records available online

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

State starts planning for college closures
"Higher education is dealing with its share of issues. The recent admissions scandal involving Hollywood celebrities, coupled with broader outrage against mounting student debt, has forced many colleges and universities to question their practices and futures. 
But a more insidious problem is weaving its way through higher education circles as well. A number of small colleges, including many in Massachusetts, have been forced to merge with larger institutions or close. What remains unclear is how the state will be affected by the closures and what state officials and lawmakers will do to protect students and employees. 
The abrupt closure of Mount Ida College in Newton last spring was the smoke that signaled a fire. With just a few weeks’ notice, the school left 280 faculty and staff without jobs and more than 1,000 students without a college to return to in the fall."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190527/state-education-officials-seek-to-head-off-college-closures

WWII MA Death records available online

"James Tarallia when as a private first class in the United States Army when he died of a gunshot wound on Sept.5, 1942 “at North Atlantic base.” 
“The first Framingham boy to lose his life in foreign service in this war,” reads the death record filed with the state of Massachusetts. He was born in 1919. 
Twenty days before the war ended in Europe, Robert A. Craddock of Milford died “in service in the European area.” A sergeant in the United States Army appears to be the last man from Milford to die in World War II. 
Taralli, who had lived at 50 Beaver St., Framingham, and Craddock, 83 Main St., Milford, can be found among hundreds of WWII death records of Massachusetts veterans now available online. The Secretary of State’s office released a digitized version of the records earlier this year, making it easy for people to comb through the index by name or by town online."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190527/states-world-war-ii-casualty-index-available-online

The digital archive can be found here
http://digitalarchives.sec.state.ma.us/uncategorised/collection_02102549-ad9c-458d-9d68-66e6f9a648b8/

The digital record for Timothy Hayes
The digital record for Sgt Timothy J Hayes

Sgt Timothy J Hayes
Sgt Timothy J Hayes

For more about Sgt Timothy J Hayes

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Morrongiello Selected to Deliver MassBay Student Commencement Address

MassBay Community College is pleased to announce that, Maxwell Sherman Morrongiello of Franklin, MA, will deliver the student commencement address to his fellow classmates and guests at the College’s 57th commencement ceremony on Thursday, May 23, 2019. 

Morrongiello will graduate with an Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts with a concentration in Psychology and Sociology and plans to attend Bridgewater State University in fall 2019 to pursue a bachelor’s degree in Economics or Political Science.

Morrongiello is honored to be delivering the student commencement address, explaining, "I've come a along way since struggling to fit in as child at high school and coping with anxiety as a young adult. Many of my fellow graduates have also had a wide varety of challenges they have had to overcome in order to get here. 

MassBay has been dedicated to helping its students overcome these obstacles to succeed, whether it is due to food insecurity, a disability, or financial hardship. I will be focusing my address on our shared jouney as we celebrate our accomplishments together.”

During his time at MassBay, Morrongiello participated in the Student Government Association (SGA) and served as Parliamentarian, Legislation Committee Chair, and founded and chaired the SGA Summer Committee, ensuring SGA had an on-campus presence during summer classes. Morrongiello served on the Time and Space Committee working to bring Common Hour to the College, a one-hour break during the Monday and Wednesday class schedule that allows time for students to join clubs, activities, or have more study time. 

He served on the Student Nourishment and Care Committee (SNACC) to help fight student hunger on campus, even participating in an interview with WGBH and PBS NewsHour about our frozen meal collaboration with Boston-based organization, Food For Free. Morrongiello also led an initiative with the SGA and the Provost’s Office to recognize the achievements of part-time students to include them on the Dean’s List, which passed faculty governance.

https://www.massbay.edu/
https://www.massbay.edu/
Morrongiello is also an elected member of the Franklin Democratic Town Committee and serves as the webmaster. He was an intern with State Representative, Jeffrey Roy, of Franklin. He has volunteered his time as a speaker with the Department of Mental Health’s Community Conversation Initiative to eliminate the stigma of mental illness. 

Morrongiello presented to the Worcester Police Department’s Crisis Intervention Training about his own road to mental health to help officers better understand the issue first-hand. “I have spent a lot of time focused on my own recovery with anxiety, while also trying to educate others to demystify mental illness. I find the more you talk about mental illness the more that stigma breaks down.”

MassBay Community College is ranked by the Brookings Institution as one of the top schools for value added and earned salaries in the workforce. Ranked #1 for 2-year colleges in Massachusetts, #2 in New England and ranked #16 nationally. The College’s facilities in Wellesley Hills, Framingham and Ashland house day, evening and weekend classes that meet the needs of degree-seeking students and career minded life-long learners. Online options provide convenience and allow faculty to facilitate the learning process. Since its founding in 1961, MassBay has been accredited by several governing bodies and strives to meet the needs of the diverse local communities it serves.