Showing posts with label medical. Show all posts
Showing posts with label medical. Show all posts

Saturday, April 16, 2022

NETA’s Countdown to 4/20 begins today!

The Celebration of the Official Cannabis Holiday Begins Today in Franklin

NETA today begins the countdown to the cannabis holiday known as “4/20” at its Franklin store, in the outdoor parking lot, at 162 Grove St.

Everyone must be 21 years or older.  You must show a legal ID to enter.

The event will be held from noon-4p with free parking.

The festivities include:
Food and ice cream trucks
A prize wheel with NETA gifts (hats, pins, lighters)
A “learn how to grow” booth where you can ask NETA cultivators the best tips to home grow
Photo booth to celebrate “4/20”
The NETA team who can answer your questions

We hope you can stop by and say hello.
4/20” dates to the 1970’s in California – to a specific time of day when cannabis was consumed.  The specific time later became the date “4/20” which is now recognized around the country as a day of celebration. 

 

NETA’s Countdown to 4/20 begins today!
NETA’s Countdown to 4/20 begins today! 

Friday, December 3, 2021

Botera Ribbon Cutting officially opens for business on Grove St

Ribbon Cutting for New United Regional Chamber of Commerce Member Botera

Last week, the United Regional Chamber of Commerce welcomed new member, Botera, a recreational cannabis dispensary at 1256 W. Central Street, Suite 6, Franklin https://boterama.com/. The Franklin store is the second Botera; joining the first store, which is at 747 Centre Street in Brockton.

Botera offers high-quality cannabis products in a comfortable, welcoming, and customer-focused atmosphere for adults 21+. The budtenders at Botera will help each visitor to enjoy a personalized cannabis experience. Visitors are assigned a personal budtender who has been trained to answer questions, educate them about Botera's unique products, and provide tailored recommendations based on their needs and anticipated results.


Left to right: State Representative Shawn Dooley; URCC Board Member Charlie Miller of Business Solutions Advisory Group; State Representative Jeff Roy; Jack Patel; Botera owner Chirag Patel; URCC Board Member Zach Patten of Oak Grove Insurance; David Webster, GM of the Franklin Botera store; URCC Board Member Kate Hyde of Springhill Suites by Marriott in Wrentham; Derek Cameron of URCC member 3805 Productions; Franklin Assistant Town Manager Alecia Alleyne; and URCC President Jack Lank.
Left to right: State Representative Shawn Dooley; URCC Board Member Charlie Miller of Business Solutions Advisory Group; State Representative Jeff Roy; Jack Patel; Botera owner Chirag Patel; URCC Board Member Zach Patten of Oak Grove Insurance; David Webster, GM of the Franklin Botera store; URCC Board Member Kate Hyde of Springhill Suites by Marriott in Wrentham; Derek Cameron of URCC member 3805 Productions; Franklin Assistant Town Manager Alecia Alleyne; and URCC President Jack Lank.


Jack Lank, IOM
President & CEO
The United Regional Chamber of Commerce
310 South Street
Plainville, MA 02762
Phone:  508-316-0861
www.unitedregionalchamber.org
"People Do Business With People They Know"

Friday, May 28, 2021

"COVID-19 symptoms commonly persisted beyond the acute phase of infection, with implications for health-associated functioning and quality of life"

While COVID-19 restrictions are easing, the disease and lasting effects remain to be reckoned with. 

Via Nature.com:  "Count the cost of disability caused by COVID-19

"The COVID-19 pandemic is well into its second year, but countries are only beginning to grapple with the lasting health crisis. In March, a UK consortium reported that 1 in 5 people who were hospitalized with the disease had a new disability after discharge1. A large US study found similar effects for both hospitalized and non-hospitalized people2. Among adults who were not hospitalized, 1 in 10 have ongoing symptoms 12 weeks after a positive test3. Treatment services for the long-term consequences of COVID-19 are already having to be absorbed into health and care systems urgently. Tackling this requires a much clearer picture of the burden of the disease than currently exists.

Tracking disease cases and deaths has advantages in a health emergency — they are easily collated, and, to some extent, trends can be compared across countries. But continuing the use of such simplified metrics heightens the risks of underestimating the true health impact on a population. It focuses policy and public discourse on the immediate prevention of deaths and on the economic impact of lockdown policies, ignoring the long-term disease-related disabilities that will also affect well-being and productivity."

Continue reading the article online 

Via Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA): "Assessment of the Frequency and Variety of Persistent Symptoms Among Patients With COVID-19"
Question  What are the frequency and variety of persistent symptoms after COVID-19 infection?

Findings  In this systematic review of 45 studies including 9751 participants with COVID-19, the median proportion of individuals who experienced at least 1 persistent symptom was 73%; symptoms occurring most frequently included shortness of breath or dyspnea, fatigue or exhaustion, and sleep disorders or insomnia. However, the studies were highly heterogeneous and needed longer follow-up and more standardized designs.

Meaning  This systematic review found that COVID-19 symptoms commonly persisted beyond the acute phase of infection, with implications for health-associated functioning and quality of life; however, methodological improvements are needed to reliably quantify these risks.
Continue reading the article online 

Thursday, December 31, 2020

Boston Globe: "Workers to get a boost in 2021 as new laws take effect Jan. 1"

The Boston Globe has the following:
"The new year will be an important one for workers’ rights in Massachusetts. Here are three key pieces of legislation that will take effect in 2021. The trio is part of a large labor and wages bill passed in 2018, known as the grand bargain. Advocates say several of the measures will help workers desperately in need of relief during the pandemic. In addition, starting this year workers will be eligible for holiday pay on Juneteenth, after officials recognized it as a state holiday.

1. Paid family and medical leave

Starting next year, all employees in Massachusetts will have access to paid family and medical leave that will allow up to 12 weeks of family leave and up to 20 weeks of medical leave, with the guarantee that they would be restored to their same or equivalent positions, with the same status, pay, and employment benefits."
 
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

Thursday, April 30, 2020

Dr. Greg Chiklis and MRN Diagnostics in the News

From the Franklin Downtown Partnership:
"MRN Diagnostics, a Franklin-based company and a member of the Franklin Downtown Partnership, has developed a rapid COVID-19 antibody test. Last week, Dr. Greg Chiklis and other researchers at MRN Diagnostics received emergency FDA approval for a tool that could be key in combating the coronavirus. The tests can determine whether you've been exposed to the virus and how much immunity you may have.

Thank you to Dr. Chiklis and his team for being part of the solution. We are excited to report this positive news story."

View the news story reported by NBC News Boston here
https://www.nbcboston.com/news/coronavirus/local-chemist-helps-develop-rapid-covid-19-antibody-test/2114162/


Dr. Greg Chiklis and MRN Diagnostics in the News
Dr. Greg Chiklis and MRN Diagnostics in the News

Sunday, April 19, 2020

Massachusetts Legislature Passes Legal Protections for Health Care Workers, Facilities, And Organizations Responding to COVID-19

The Massachusetts House of Representatives and State Senate on Friday passed legislation to shield those providing critical health care services from legal liability for the duration of the COVID-19 emergency.

“We owe a debt of gratitude to the brave men and women in health care who continue to treat patients amid this public health pandemic,” stated Senate President Karen E. Spilka (D- Ashland). “This urgently needed legislation will ensure that our healthcare system will be able to expand capacity quickly to treat patients during the surge of COVID-19 in Massachusetts. I would like to acknowledge Senators Michael Rodrigues, Cindy Friedman and James Welch, as well as Speaker DeLeo and our colleagues in the House for expeditiously advancing this critical bill.”

"Our action today will protect our health care workers and health care facilities during this time of crisis as they work to care for an unprecedented number of patients,” said House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo (D – Winthrop). “This legislation will give our health care providers a sense of relief as they heroically treat the residents of the Commonwealth. I appreciate the leadership of Senate President Spilka as well as the work of Chairs Michlewitz and Murphy to bring these issues forward.”

“With the COVID-19 surge now upon us, our health care system is under duress and being tested like it’s never been tested before,” said Senator Michael J. Rodrigues (D-Westport), Chair of the Senate Committee on Ways and Means. “With the passage of this important legislation today, the Senate has acted with urgency to provide peace of mind protections to our front-line health care workers who are going above and beyond to help those in critical need of care during this incredibly difficult time.”

“This necessary legislation will provide much needed liability relief for our health care workers and facilities so they can continue to focus on combating the COVID-19 public health crisis," said Representative Aaron Michlewitz, Co-Chair of the Joint Committee on Ways & Means (D-Boston).

“This is a major step in ensuring that we have the workforce necessary to address the healthcare needs of our residents during the current pandemic,” said Senator Cindy F. Friedman (D- Arlington), co-chair of the Joint Committee on Health Care Financing. “This bill maximizes protections for a wide variety of healthcare workers on the front lines of the COVID-19 response, who are sometimes being asked to work in very unique settings like field hospitals and other locations. I want to thank the Senate President and Chair Rodrigues for recognizing the urgency of this issue and for moving this bill forward quickly.”

“Health care professionals from a variety of disciplines, and from different stages of their careers are risking their lives to join the fight against this pandemic,” said Senator James T. Welch (D- West Springfield). “As a Commonwealth, we owe it to these dedicated amazing medical personnel to relieve them of this burden. We have to show them that we value their courage and that we trust that they are giving the best possible care available for all patients.”

“During this time, we must do all that we can to protect front line workers,” said Representative James Murphy (D – Weymouth), Chair of the Financial Services Committee. “This legislation will go a long way to ensure that our health care professionals who are thrust into this worldwide pandemic are afforded vital legal protections enabling them to do their job in an extremely trying health care environment. We owe a debt of gratitude to all of them and I know together we will get through this.”

“The stress and strain imposed on health care professionals right now is unlike anything that they have endured; by taking legislative action we lessen some of that burden," said Senate Minority Leader Bruce Tarr (R-Gloucester). "These healers are heroes and they deserve the legal protection to make good decisions based on their best medical judgement in this
uncharted territory.”

“Our health care professionals are on the front lines caring for COVID-19 patients while operating under extraordinarily difficult and strenuous conditions,” said House Minority Leader Bradley H. Jones, Jr. (R-North Reading). “Protecting these essential workers from the threat of lawsuits and civil liability will help make their jobs a little easier, while sending a strong message to the health care community that we fully support their continuing efforts to keep us all safe and healthy.”

Under the legislation, health care professionals, facilities and volunteer organizations assisting in the state’s efforts to respond and treat COVID-19 would be protected from suit and civil liability for alleged damages related to the virus. Health care facilities and professionals would still be subject to consumer complaints brought by the Attorney General and protections would not extend to acts of negligence, recklessness, or intent to harm or acts of discrimination. These protections would apply retroactively to March 10, 2020, and remain in effect for the duration of the State of Emergency.

The bill, which is the latest action by the Legislature to address the COVID-19 public health crisis and its effects on Massachusetts, has been signed by the Governor.

Wednesday, April 1, 2020

Tri-County RVTHS Uses 3D Printers to Make PPE Face Shields

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School has begun using its 3D printers to make face shields for local medical care providers. Currently, Tri-County is in contact with the Milford Health Department and North Attleboro Health Department to get them face shields and also has expressed interest from Sturdy Memorial Hospital, Veterans Affairs, and Norwood hospitals. The list continues to grow.

3D printing is not magic
3D printing is not magic
Tri-County is also one of at least 15 Massachusetts schools who are working together to make shields for Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

“3D printing is not magic. But, as I looked into it more and got connected with some folks who were finalizing a design that was perfect for 3D printing and approved by care providers, I decided to jump in,” said Kristen Magas, a Tri-County Engineer Technology Instructor. She also shared the design Tri-County is utilizing for those who are interested.
face shields made at the school
face shields made at the school

The machines need frequent tending to get a large number of parts printed. “Harry [Takesian, Director of Facilities] and his team have been putting fresh trays in the machines when one print finishes and then starting up the next print,” Magas explained. Each print takes between one to three hours depending on the machine.

“We all look for ways to feel helpful and useful in this time of helplessness. I feel lucky to have this opportunity to help in some small way, and I am so grateful to the administration and to Harry and his team for making this work,” Magas said.


Monday, March 30, 2020

COVID-19 PPE Procurement and Donation Program


"The Baker-Polito Administration announced an online portal where individuals and companies can easily donate or sell personal protective equipment (PPE) and volunteer to support the COVID-19 outbreak in Massachusetts. This effort will ensure that front line responders get the protective equipment they need to stay and push for more trained volunteers to join the response.

“Massachusetts has already received generous donations from countless organizations, and by launching this portal we’ll make it easier to streamline these offers and quickly distribute supplies to those in need,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “We also need more volunteers to help support our response to this unprecedented public health emergency, and urge people to sign up to lend a hand. Our administration will continue making every effort to secure supplies from all possible resources to support our front line workers during these tough times.”

The Commonwealth’s COVID-19 PPE Procurement and Donation Program creates an easy portal allowing companies and organizations to sell or donate protective equipment that is in short supply given the global demands for such items."
For additional info
https://www.mass.gov/news/baker-polito-administration-launches-online-portal-for-personal-protective-equipment

Visit the COVID-19 PPE Procurement and Donation web page
https://www.mass.gov/covid-19-ppe-procurement-and-donation-program

Shared via Twitter:
https://twitter.com/MassGovernor/status/1244287599881191429

COVID-19 PPE Procurement and Donation Program
COVID-19 PPE Procurement and Donation Program

Friday, March 27, 2020

Tri-County RVTHS Donates Medical Supplies to Facilities in Need of PPE

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School delivered medical supplies, including Clorox wipes, face masks, gowns, hand sanitizer, and safety glasses, gathered from several of its program departments to facilities in need of personal protection equipment (PPE). These PPE supplies are critical in keeping medical staff safe as they combat COVID-19. Facilities include UMass Memorial, Sturdy Memorial and Countryside Manor.

Several Tri-County graduates who are now working in the medical field have been coordinating with Health Careers instructor Suzanne Dodakian to get these medical supplies, which are in high-demand in the midst of this global pandemic, where they are needed.

“There is no doubt that our doctors, nurses and caretakers are needed now more than ever,” said Superintendent Stephen Dockray. “We are grateful to be able to help them do their jobs and do them safely. Thank you to every medical staff member who is selflessly working to take care of their communities and those who in need of treatment.”

With support from Facilities Director, Harry Takesian, Vocational Coordinator, Cathie Rebelo, and LPN teachers, Patricia Munger, Tara Lane, Maureen Johnson, Suzanne Dodakian, and Lisa Ferrigno we were able to collect, box, and deliver these supplies. From all of us at Tri-County: Stay home, stay healthy, and stay safe.

 
From left to right: Cathie Rebelo, Stephen Dockray, Harry Takesian
From left to right: Cathie Rebelo, Stephen Dockray, Harry Takesian


From left to right: Patricia Munger, Tara Lane, Maureen Johnson, Suzanne Dodakian, and Lisa Ferrigno
From left to right: Patricia Munger, Tara Lane, Maureen Johnson, Suzanne Dodakian, and Lisa Ferrigno


Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Tri-County RVTHS Open House for Grade 7-8 students Nov 5

When Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School host its annual Open House for grade 7 and 8 students on Tuesday, November 5, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., attendees will be among the first to explore several new technologies available to students.

During the Open House, Tri-County’s new state-of-the-art Medical Assisting facility, which opened to students in September, will be open to the public for the first time.

“As a school that aligns its curricula to future workforce needs, Tri-County is fully committed to preparing students for the careers that will be available over the next decade. We’ve expanded our healthcare offerings as we work collaboratively with our industry partners to tackle workforce shortages, particularly a shortage of nurses,” explained Tri-County Superintendent-Director Stephen Dockray, “We strongly encourage middle school families to visit Tri-County to not only determine if our high school is the right fit for their child, but also to explore and consider the careers that will be available to their child upon graduation from high school and college.”
Tri-County’s new state-of-the-art Medical Assisting facility
Tri-County’s new state-of-the-art Medical Assisting facility

In addition to the new Medical Assisting facility, Tri-County unveiled a new Engineering wing in the spring that includes new advanced manufacturing and robotics equipment.
“Our goal is to ensure our vocational shops emulate the workplace,” said Principal Michael Procaccini. “In Carpentry, that often means working with clients on construction projects. In Early Education, that means running a child care center and building a curriculum geared toward young children. Our students develop the soft skills and employability skills that are critical to career success. Many choose to continue their studies in college with the strong foundation they built here at Tri-County.”

In addition to touring the school’s 16 Career Programs, families will have the opportunity to learn about Tri-County’s rigorous academic courses that include Advanced Placement offerings and a for-credit college-level Spanish Program operated in partnership with Bristol Community College.

Student-athletes will be available to discuss the high school’s sports teams which compete in the Mayflower Athletic Conference. Student ambassadors and current Tri-Count parents will be on site to discuss extracurricular programs, cooperative education and school culture.

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School serves students in Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Norfolk, North Attleborough, Plainville, Sherborn, Seekonk, Walpole, Wrentham.

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Tri-County Students Get Pinned

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School friends and family members joined Medical Careers instructors, Anne-Marie Guanci, Suzanne Dodakian, Aimee Evers, and Victoria Shokunbi, in honoring senior students for all their certifications and accomplishments with a pinning ceremony.

Since beginning their Medical Careers program, students received the following certifications/training:

Sophomore year: American Heart Association's First Aid and CPR, OSHA, Dean Vaughn Medical Terminology, and the Alzheimer Association's Dementia Care training.

Junior year: Certified Nursing Assistant.

Senior Year: Home Health Aide Training, AHA Health Care Provider CPR with AED, and some students completed First Responder Training.

The pinning ceremony honored twenty-six seniors in the Medical Careers vocational program. The students awarded their pins are:

  • Caroline Aspinwall of Walpole
  • Corinne Blasetti of North Attleboro
  • Christina Brousseau of North Attleboro
  • Emily Brousseau of North Attleboro
  • Adianna Celeste of North Attleboro
  • Mackenzie Crawford of Attleboro
  • Andrea DeLeon of Walpole
  • Ava DiCenso of North Attleboro
  • Grace Dunnebier of Franklin
  • Nathan Glidden of North Attleboro
  • Lia Hall of North Attleboro
  • Kaitlyn Jones of Plainville
  • Sarah Killoy of Franklin
  • Hannah Lanthier of North Attleboro
  • Maia Lavigne of North Attleboro
  • Carolyn MacPherson of North Attleboro
  • Emma Mangiacotti of Norfolk
  • Avery McMorran of North Attleboro
  • Gabriella Mills of North Attleboro
  • Olivia Muise of North Attleboro
  • Delaney Myers of North Attleboro
  • Jillian Plante of North Attleboro
  • Justina-Ann Sauro of Franklin
  • Katie Udell of Medway
  • Nicole Veader of Seekonk
  • Shannon Zogalis of North Attleboro



Tri-County RVTHS, located at 147 Pond Street in Franklin, is a recipient of the High Schools That Work Gold Achievement Award and serves the communities of Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Norfolk, North Attleboro, Plainville, Seekonk, Sherborn, Walpole, and Wrentham.

The pinning ceremony honored twenty-six seniors in the Medical Careers vocational program
The pinning ceremony honored twenty-six seniors
in the Medical Careers vocational program

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

In the News: Franklin curbside pickup fees to rise; Fall construction alert - Rtes. 16 and 140 near Milford Regional Medical

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

Franklin curbside pickup fees to rise
"Trash and recycling fees are going up due to international struggles with plastic disposal. 
Town councilors approved a rate hike of $32 on March 20, raising the average annual cost for curbside trash and recycle pickup to $240. The council also voted to raise the price of stickers in 2020 from $25 to $35 for the transfer station on Beaver Street. 
Franklin recycles about 3,600 tons of waste a year. The cost will rise to $55 a ton in 2020, $20 more a ton than the town currently pays. The town sold around 240 stickers last year, but is considering either eliminating the option or increasing the 10-day fee to $25. 
In the last year, China has been sent massive amounts of plastic waste for recycling purposes. According to NPR, about 106 million metric tons, or roughly 45 percent of the world’s plastic ready for recycling, was exported to China. Inundated with the waste, the country decided at the start of last year to decline any more shipments."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190326/franklin-trash-recycling-fees-increasing

Note: The first of two votes to approve the rate increase was held on March 20. The second vote is scheduled for a future Town Council meeting before becoming effective July 1. While the fee is increasing, we are still below where the fee was in 2005.


Due to global market issues for recycling, proposal to increase curbside fee
Due to global market issues for recycling, proposal to increase curbside fee


Construction alert: Rtes. 16 and 140 near Milford Regional Medical Center
"The planned facelift for one of Milford’s most heavily traveled roads remains on track to begin this fall. 
The half-mile stretch of Rte. 16 from just past the Milford police headquarters to the Hopedale town border will receive a long-awaited upgrade. The project will focus on the intersection of Rtes. 16 and 140 near Milford Regional Medical Center. The intersection is a regular spot for traffic backups and will be widened to make way for dedicated turning lanes, which should ease the turning radius for large trucks and tractor-trailers. 
“You cannot get through that intersection if someone is taking a left turn,” said Highway Surveyor Scott Crisafulli. “It’s too small.” 
New modern traffic signals with preemptive control for emergency vehicles approaching the intersection are part of the project."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190325/milford-rte-16140-intersection-project-includes-new-signals-bike-lanes

Friday, May 4, 2018

19 Medical Careers Students Celebrated with Pinning Ceremony

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School friends and family members joined Medical Careers instructors, Suzanne Dodakian, Paula Hutchinson and Anne-Marie Guanci in honoring senior students for all their certifications and accomplishments with a pinning ceremony.

Since beginning their Medical Careers program, students received the following certifications/training:
  • Sophomore year: American Heart Association's First Aid and CPR, OSHA, Dean Vaughn Medical Terminology, and the Alzheimer Association's Dementia Care training.
  • Junior year: Certified Nursing Assistant.
  • Senior Year: Home Health Aide Training, AHA Health Care Provider CPR with AED, and some students completed First Responder Training.
The pinning ceremony honored nineteen seniors in the Medical Careers Program. The students awarded their pins are:
  • Esmirna Amaya of North Attleboro
  • Ashley Barratt of North Attleboro
  • Alyssa Bartick of Plainville
  • Krista Beaulieu of Wrentham
  • Alivia Carney of North Attleboro
  • Katrina Chapman of North Attleboro
  • Rosa DeMartinis of Medway
  • Rianna Deveau of Medway
  • Margaret Dolitka of Franklin
  • Hannah Goudreau of North Attleboro
  • Hannah Graveline of North Attleboro
  • Kassidy Lane of Franklin
  • Isabella Leonardi of Plainville
  • Ryan Malewicz of Mills
  • Amanda Merigo of North Attleboro
  • Kaylee O'Reilly of North Attleboro
  • Alberto Renovato-Sanchez of Franklin
  • Olivia Ryan of North Attleboro
  • Britni Thibodeau of Franklin


19 Medical Careers Students Celebrated with Pinning Ceremony
19 Medical Careers Students Celebrated with Pinning Ceremony

Tri-County RVTHS, located at 147 Pond Street in Franklin, is a recipient of the High Schools That Work Gold Achievement Award and serves the communities of Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Norfolk, North Attleboro, Plainville, Seekonk, Sherborn, Walpole, and Wrentham.

Sunday, April 22, 2018

MassBudget: The health effects of Paid Family and Medical Leave




MassBudget  Information.
  Participation.
 Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center  Democracy.
April 19, 2018






The health effects of Paid Family and Medical Leave

Health is influenced by a variety of factors, such as where people live, access to healthy foods, and affordability of health care. Policies that address a worker's ability to care for family members, like Paid Family and Medical Leave (PFML), also shape health outcomes.
The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center's new report, Time to Care:The Health Effects of Paid Family & Medical Leave, finds that PFML can have a range of effects on child health, parental health, and senior health.
The report explores the different impacts PFML has on health outcomes, which include:
  • Reducing negative effects that particular aspects of work have on pregnant women, many of which are associated with delivery complications.
  • Benefits to children's and mothers' health through increased rates and duration of breastfeeding when mothers are able to take leave.
  • More time for parents to bond with newborns, recover from childbirth, and take young children to the doctor.
  • Improvement of mothers' mental health when they have access to job-protected, paid leave.
  • More time for workers to care for elder relatives.
MassBudget: The health effects of Paid Family and Medical Leave
Read the full report here.
The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget) produces policy research, analysis, and data-driven recommendations focused on improving the lives of low- and middle-income children and adults, strengthening our state's economy, and enhancing the quality of life in Massachusetts.

MASSACHUSETTS BUDGET AND POLICY CENTER
15 COURT SQUARE, SUITE 700
BOSTON, MA 02108


Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 15 Court Square, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02108

Sent by nberger@massbudget.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Tri-County Medical Careers Students Celebrate Pinning Ceremony

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School friends and family members joined Medical Careers instructors, Suzanne Dodakian, Paula Hutchinson and Anne-Marie Guanci in honoring senior students with a pinning ceremony.

Since beginning their Medical Careers program, students have received the following certifications/training:

Sophomore year: American Heart Association’s First Aid and CPR, OSHA, Dean Vaughn Medical Terminology, and the Alzheimer Association’s Dementia Care training.

Junior year: Certified Nursing Assistant.

Senior Year: Home Health Aide Training, AHA Health Care Provider CPR with AED, and some students completed First Responder Training.

The pinning ceremony honored nineteen seniors in the Medical Careers program. 
The students awarded their pins are:


  • Anna Bercot of Walpole
  • Katelyn Billington of North Attleborough
  • Jenna Booth of North Attleborough
  • Sabrina Botelho of Seekonk
  • Devin Driscoll of Millis
  • Hollyann Edwards of Norfolk
  • Jamie Ferland of Wrentham
  • Abigail Fisher of North Attleborough
  • Delaney Forbes of Franklin
  • Gabrielle Gagne of Seekonk
  • Alyssa Gauthier of Walpole
  • Brandon Isom of North Attleborough
  • Tori Kehlhem of Franklin
  • Britney Lizotte of North Attleborough
  • Kathleen Loonie of North Attleborough
  • Kelsey Morin of Franklin
  • Emily Small of Wrentham
  • Megan Walker-Nelson of North Attleborough
  • Jacqueline Wallace of North Attleborough

Tri-County RVTHS recently celebrated our Medical Careers seniors with a Pinning Ceremony
Tri-County RVTHS recently celebrated our Medical Careers seniors with a Pinning Ceremony

About Tri-County RVTHS

Tri-County RVTHS, located at 147 Pond Street in Franklin, is a recipient of the High Schools That Work Gold Achievement Award and serves the communities of Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Norfolk, North Attleborough, Plainville, Seekonk, Sherborn, Walpole, and Wrentham. For more information go to www.tri-county.us.

Friday, March 24, 2017

Tri-County Urgent Care - Now Open in Milford!

Tri-County Medical has opened a new Urgent Care facility in Milford. 129 South Main St will be treating patients for non-emergent illnesses and injuries. No appointment is necessary, it is open weekends and evenings.

Tri-County Urgent Care - Now Open in Milford!
Tri-County Urgent Care - Now Open in Milford!

Thursday, January 26, 2017

"some in the Legislature want to see the law curtailed"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Voters on Election Day chose to legalize recreational marijuana by a seven-point majority. But now the ultimate fate of the vote is in the Legislature's hands. 
Given some of the bills filed by the deadline last Friday, it could change dramatically. 
Over the next two years, legislators will have the option of signing into law more than 30 bills related to legal pot. The proposals range wildly, from repealing the law entirely to expunging every offense related to the drug. 
Fifteen bills filed by state Sen. Jason Lewis dominated the news cycle on the Friday filing deadline. But the breadth of proposals introduced for this next legislative session suggest that the law voters ratified and the one we end up following could be very different."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170125/medical-marijuana-changes-could-be-coming

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

"Providing convenient access to quality healthcare"

From the Franklin radar:
"MedPost Urgent Care continues to broaden access to urgent care services -- it opened its first clinic in Massachusetts on July 1, 2016. Located next to Starbucks at 648 Old West Central Street in Suite C, this center is open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., seven days a week. Locations in Wayland and Northborough are also available for same-day service. 
At MedPost, patients can be treated for both injuries and illnesses. The MedPost clinicians can treat a wide range of conditions from allergy complications to minor broken bones and burns. Additionally, centers offer annual checkups for preventative care, as well as vaccinations and in-house lab testing and diagnostics. If your child needs a school or sports physical, MedPost offers these services for $25 every day. 
Core service offerings include urgent care, wellness, seasonal care and occupational health. Beyond MedPost's core service offerings, patients of the new Franklin urgent care center will also have the option to access the broader physician resources of MetroWest Medical Center or St. Vincent's Hospital if required."

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/3025186#ixzz4GCjYlTN6

MedPost Urgent Care is located in Franklin next to Starbucks
MedPost Urgent Care is located in Franklin next to Starbucks
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Saturday, May 28, 2016

MassBudget: Two New Fact Sheets on Paid Family Medical Leave


Studies analyze leave in Mass and other states


MassBudget  Information.
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 Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center  Democracy.


Two new fact sheets released today from MassBudget examine what Massachusetts residents do now in the absence of a statewide Paid Family and Medical Leave (PFML) program, and examine what we can learn from other states that have enacted statewide PFML.

When they have a child, need to care for an ill family member, or are ill themselves, Massachusetts workers often can't afford to take extended leave with a total loss of wages. Existing laws can help eligible employees to take shorter-term paid leave or ensure the right to longer-term unpaid leave if they can afford it. But workers have fewer options if they can't afford more than a short duration without their wages.

The first research report, Family and Medical Leave in Massachusetts: A Current Snapshot, authored by economists Randy Albelda from the University of Massachusetts Boston and Alan Clayton-Matthews from Northeastern University, develop a simulation model that estimates how many Massachusetts residents need and take a leave to cope with a serious illness, pregnancy or a new child. The study finds, for instance, that about 12 percent of Massachusetts workers take a medical or family leave annually, but about a quarter of them take a shorter leave than they need and a slightly larger number of workers who need leave do not take it.

Most other industrialized countries and four U.S. states have found another way. California, New Jersey, Rhode Island, and (starting in 2018) New York use insurance-style programs that replace a portion of workers' wages. This enables workers to take time off to address a serious personal or family health condition or to care for a new child. MassBudget's new fact sheet What We Can Learn from Other States' Experiences with Paid Family and Medical Leave examines evidence on the impact of these programs on families and businesses.

Current Statewide Paid Family and Medical Leave Programs
Weeks of Family Leave
Weeks of Own-Health Leave (incl. pregnancy)
Maximum Wage Replacement
California
6
52
55%
New Jersey
6
26
66%
Rhode Island
4
30
60%
New York
8 (rising to 12 by 2021)
26
50% (rising to 67% by 2021)
You can read MassBudget's short explainers on how workers in Massachusetts currently cope (HERE) and the experience of other states (HERE). See also MassBudget's previous fact sheet sorting out how PFML differs from other related policies (HERE) and our FAQ: Paid Family & Medical Leave (HERE). You can also read the complete recent report by economists Randy Albelda and Alan Clayton-Matthews issued by UMass Boston's Center for Social Policy and Center for Women in Politics and Public Policy (HERE).

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget) produces policy research, analysis, and data-driven recommendations focused on improving the lives of low- and middle-income children and adults, strengthening our state's economy, and enhancing the quality of life in Massachusetts.

MASSACHUSETTS BUDGET AND POLICY CENTER
15 COURT SQUARE, SUITE 700
BOSTON, MA 02108
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