Showing posts with label hurricane. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hurricane. Show all posts

Saturday, August 21, 2021

MAEnergy Environment: Hurricane Safety Tips

MAEnergy Environment (@MassEEA) tweeted Fri, Aug 20, 2021:
🧵 To prepare for Tropical Storm #Henri and a potential power outage, here are some practical steps you can take to keep you and your family safe.

🔋 Make sure cellphones, laptops, and other electronics are fully charged.

⚡️ Power Outage Safety Tips:  https://www.mass.gov/info-details/hurricane-safety-tips

Shared from Twitter:  https://twitter.com/MassEEA/status/1428790239124938761


MAEnergy Environment: Hurricane Safety Tips
MAEnergy Environment: Hurricane Safety Tips

Also from Boston Globe: 6 ways to prepare

From MA Consumer Affairs -> Hurricane preparedness

Thursday, August 19, 2021

Tropical Storm Henri heads for New England, stay tuned for changes in the forecast

"Keep an eye on this one. The National Hurricane Center says the expected track of Tropical Storm Henri has shifted, meaning it’s more likely it will hit the Northeastern states at the end of the week.

“The forecast track of Henri has shifted toward the northeast coast of the U.S. this weekend and early next week, increasing the risk of direct storm surge, wind, and rain impacts in portions of the northeastern U.S. and Atlantic Canada during that time,” the forecasters said Wednesday , noting that Henri was on the verge of reaching hurricane strength. “Interests in these areas should closely follow the progress of Henri and check for updates to the forecast.”
Continue reading the article online (subscription maybe required)
Since the Globe article was posted, NWS has further updated a shift more off the coast of New England.  For additional updates from the National Weather Service visit    https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/#Henri

Tropical Storm Henri heads for New England
Tropical Storm Henri heads for New England

Wednesday, July 21, 2021

Bracing for the 2021 Hurricane Season


Above-normal activity predicted for this hurricane season. Learn more in this America Counts story.
Registered United States Census Bureau Logo

America Counts: Stories Behind the Numbers

A dark cloudy sky over a beach

Bracing for the 2021 Hurricane Season

The 2021 hurricane season began on June 1 and the nation is bracing for a 60% chance of above-normal activity: The outlook from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) includes a range of 13 to 20 named storms.

Six to 10 of the storms could become hurricanes, including 3 to 5 major hurricanes (category 3, 4, or 5).    https://www.census.gov/library/stories/2021/07/bracing-for-2021-hurricane-season.html

Read More

Tropical storm Ana graced the Atlantic on May 22, weeks before the official start of the 2021 hurricane season. Tropical Storm Bill formed on June 14, Tropical Storm Claudette on June 19, Tropical Storm Danny on June 28 and Hurricane Elsa on July 1.

After last year's record-breaking hurricane season, the U.S. Census Bureau released an infographic of the three major Atlantic hurricanes that made landfall in the United States in 2020, using the Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics OnTheMap for Emergency Management data tool.

Continue reading to learn more about:

  • Above-normal activity
  • Planning for disasters

Help us spread the word about America Counts. Share this story on social media or forward it to a friend.

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About America Counts

America Counts tells the stories behind the numbers in a new inviting way. It features stories on various topics such as families, housing, employment, business, education, economy, emergency preparedness, health, populationincome and poverty. Contact our Public Information Office for media inquiries or interviews.

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Thursday, June 3, 2021

Federal Trade Commission: Getting ready for hurricane season 2021


Consumer Alerts from the Federal Trade Commission

by Ryan Ebrahimy, Intern, Division of Consumer and Business Education

June 1st is the start of hurricane season. For people in hurricane-prone areas, that means the risk of heavy rainfall, high winds, storm surges, flooding, tornados, and rip currents, which can all happen with little warning. Are you ready to leave your house at a moment's notice? We've got tools to help you prepare.

Read more ->  https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2021/06/getting-ready-hurricane-season-2021?utm_source=govdelivery

Sunday, May 16, 2021

National Weather Service readies for the 2021 hurricane season. Are we ready?

The weather is so nice and warm, after being confined indoor for winter (and due to COVID=19) it is about time we could enjoy it. Did you know that hurricane season officially starts soon? Alerts started on May 15. The season officially opens June 1.

Sign up for alerts from the National Weather Service (NWS)  https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

Additional info on service enhancements for this season as well as info on the social media accounts to track   https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/NHC_new_products_services_2021.pdf

Oops, we already missed "Hurricane preparedness week" (May 9-15)


"Today, May 15th, marks the first day of routine issuance of the
Atlantic basin Tropical Weather Outlook in 2021. This product
describes significant areas of disturbed weather and their potential for tropical cyclone formation during the next five days. The Tropical Weather Outlook is issued from May 15 through November 30 each year. The issuance times of this product are 2 AM, 8 AM, 2 AM, and 8 PM EDT. After the change to standard time in November, the issuance times are 1 AM, 7 AM, 1 PM, and 7 PM EST.
 

A Special Tropical Weather Outlook will be issued to provide
updates, as necessary, in between the regularly scheduled issuances of the Tropical Weather Outlook. Special Tropical Weather Outlooks will be issued under the same WMO and AWIPS headers as the regular Tropical Weather Outlooks.
 

A graphical version of the Tropical Weather Outlook is available on the web at: https://www.hurricanes.gov."


There are no tropical cyclones in the Atlantic at this time.
There are no tropical cyclones in the Atlantic at this time.


Friday, August 28, 2020

In the News: "conditions have made 2020 a record-setter"

 From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"Texas and Louisiana may have braced for the worst this week as back-to-back hurricanes Marco and Laura barreled toward them, but in this record-setting Atlantic hurricane season, almost every coastal U.S. state east of the Mississippi River should also be on high alert. 
All but one of the 18 states bordering the Atlantic Ocean or Gulf of Mexico face a greater risk this year of a hurricane strike, according to the forecast from Colorado State University’s Department of Atmospheric Science, which has issued seasonal hurricane forecasts every year since 1984. 
Only New Hampshire’s risk remains unchanged at a 1% chance of a direct hit. Every other state’s risk increased by 33-100%. 
In Massachusetts, the CSU team predicted the odds of a land-falling hurricane this year at 10%, compared to a historical probability of 6%."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

In the News: "conditions have made 2020 a record-setter"
In the News: "conditions have made 2020 a record-setter"


Wednesday, August 26, 2020

Remains of Hurricane Laura affect New England weekend

The weekend could be wet and windy with the remains of Hurricane Laura eventually making it's way here.  We can use the rain!

Follow the progress of this storm via the National Hurricane Center   https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

NOAA Laura Storm track
NOAA Laura Storm track


NOAA Laura Storm track
NOAA Laura Storm track - Weds AM


Monday, August 3, 2020

NOAA info on Isaias

The NOAA map shows the path of Isaias as of Monday morning (8/3/20 5:30 AM). It is likely to be a tropical depression bringing some wind and much needed rain to us on Tuesday/Wednesday. Oddly, if it maintains this track, Western MA will get more of the rain than we will.

Get additional updates from NOAA here
https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphics_at4+shtml/092753.shtml?cone

Hurricane preparedness info
https://www.weather.gov/wrn/hurricane-preparedness

Stay tuned to your normal weather station for updates.

NOAA info on Isaias
NOAA info on Isaias
if it maintains this track, Western MA will get more of the rain than we will
if it maintains this track, Western MA will get more of the rain than we will

Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Hurricane Preparedness Week is Here

1 - Hurricane Risk
  • Peak of hurricane season is August and September
  • NOAA predicts above normal hurricane season; but regardless of seasonal forecast, it only takes one storm to severely impact an area
  • Entire state is at risk; storm surge threat in coastal areas and high winds, heavy rainfall, and inland flooding possible across entire state, as we saw in Irene in 2011
  • While the last hurricane in Massachusetts was Bob in 1991, the Commonwealth has a history of destructive hurricanes
  • Threat of tropical cyclones and other natural hazards continue during COVID-19 pandemic
2 - How Residents Can Prepare
  • Know Your Evacuation Zone
  • Learn if you live or work in a hurricane evacuation zone: www.mass.gov/knowyourzone
  • Make an Emergency Plan
  • Develop a plan with the members of your household to prepare for what to do in a tropical cyclone including making an evacuation plan, planning for individuals with access and functional needs, and any extra considerations during COVID-19 pandemic including how you might evacuate and where you might evacuate to. If you are in a high risk population, the safest option may be to evacuate to a location without the general public such as a hotel, relatives' home or other destination. https://www.mass.gov/info-details/make-a-family-emergency-plan
  • Build an Emergency Kit
  • Build an emergency kit containing items that will sustain you and your family in the event you are isolated for three to five days without power or unable to go to a store and customize for your family's needs. During the COVID-19 pandemic, include face coverings, masks, hand sanitizer and other cleaning supplies that you may need. https://www.mass.gov/info-details/build-an-emergency-kit.
3 - Stay Informed

Every family should have multiple methods for receiving emergency alerts. Learn more about different types of alerting and information tools including the Emergency Alert System, Wireless Emergency Alerts, NOAA Weather Radio, Social Media & Traditional Media, 2-1-1 Hotline, Local Notification Systems: https://www.mass.gov/info-details/be-informed-and-receive-emergency-alerts

Gov Baker's proclamation on Hurricane Preparedness Week
https://www.mass.gov/news/hurricane-preparedness-week-reminds-residents-to-prepare-take-precautions
 
as part of staying informed sign up for hurricane alerts from NOAA
as part of staying informed sign up for hurricane alerts from NOAA
Sign up for alerts from NOAA https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/gtwo.php?basin=atlc


Tuesday, June 2, 2020

Hurricane season 2020 and COVID-19



Consumer Alerts from the Federal Trade Commission
by Colleen Tressler, Consumer Education Specialist, FTC

June 1 is the official start of hurricane season, and now is a great time to make a plan to deal with weather emergencies. Especially because this year, we have the added concern of the COVID-19 pandemic, including what you need know if you have to go to a shelter. (Hint: it involves packing hand sanitizer and masks.)

Read more
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2020/06/hurricane-season-2020-and-covid-19
 

This is a free service provided by the Federal Trade Commission.



Today (June 1) marks the first day of the Atlantic hurricane season, which will run until November 30. Long-term averages for the number of named storms, hurricanes, and major hurricanes are 12, 6, and 3, respectively.
The list of names for 2020 is as follows:

Name Pronunciation Name Pronunciation
-------------------------------------------------------------

  • Arthur AR-thur Laura LOOR-ruh
  • Bertha BUR-thuh Marco MAR-koe
  • Cristobal krees-TOH-bahl Nana NA-na
  • Dolly DAH-lee Omar OH-mar
  • Edouard ed-DWARD Paulette pawl-LET
  • Fay fay Rene re-NAY
  • Gonzalo gohn-SAH-loh Sally SAL-ee
  • Hanna HAN-uh Teddy TEHD-ee
  • Isaias ees-ah-EE-ahs Vicky VIH-kee
  • Josephine JOH-seh-feen Wilfred WILL-fred
  • Kyle KY-ull

Two tropical storms, Arthur and Bertha, already formed this year in May. The next named storm that develops this season will be Cristobal.

This product, the Tropical Weather Outlook, briefly describes  significant areas of disturbed weather and their potential for tropical cyclone formation during the next five days. The issuance times of this product are 2 AM, 8 AM, 2 AM, and 8 PM EDT. After the change to standard time in November, the issuance times are 1 AM, 7 AM, 1 PM, and 7 PM EST.



Shared from the Tropical Weather Outlook
https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/gtwo.php?basin=atlc&202006010550
 

Saturday, June 1, 2019

"NOAA predicts near-normal 2019 Atlantic hurricane season"


"NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is predicting that a near-normal Atlantic hurricane season is most likely this year. This outlook forecasts a 40% chance of a near-normal season, a 30% chance of an above-normal season and a 30% chance of a below-normal season. The hurricane season officially extends from June 1 to November 30. 
For 2019, NOAA predicts a likely range of 9 to 15 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 4 to 8 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 2 to 4 major hurricanes (category 3, 4 or 5; with winds of 111 mph or higher). NOAA provides these ranges with a 70% confidence. An average hurricane season produces 12 named storms, of which 6 become hurricanes, including 3 major hurricanes."
Continue reading about the NOAA outlook for the 2019 Atlantic Hurricane season:
https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/noaa-predicts-near-normal-2019-atlantic-hurricane-season




For the geeks who use RSS feeds (like I do) you can find the RSS selection of NOAA data here  https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutrss.shtml


What are the names for the storms for the 1029 season?

A graphic showing 2019 Atlantic tropical cyclone names selected by the World Meteorological Organization. (NOAA)
A graphic showing 2019 Atlantic tropical cyclone names selected by
the World Meteorological Organization. (NOAA)

Friday, May 31, 2019

Hurricane season starts June 1. Are you ready?




Hurricane season starts June 1. Are you ready?
by Colleen Tressler
Consumer Education Specialist, FTC


June 1 is the official start of hurricane season, and a great time to make a plan to deal with weather emergencies. Extreme weather events, like hurricanes and other natural disasters, can occur with little warning, and the effects come in many forms. Hurricanes may include heavy rainfall, high winds, storm surge, inland flooding, tornadoes, and rip currents. 

Are you ready to leave your home at a moment's notice? The FTC's site, Dealing with Weather Emergencies, has practical tips to help you prepare for, deal with, and recover from a weather emergency.

Read more
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2019/05/hurricane-season-starts-june-1-are-you-ready?utm_campaign=weather-emergencies&utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery


This is a free service provided by the Federal Trade Commission.



Saturday, December 1, 2018

In the News: hurricane season comes to an end; Marriott reveals massive data breach; Resilience IPA to help CA fire relief

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"The 2018 hurricane season began like a lazy river, a handful of circles spinning in an atmosphere still sleepy from spring. 
Only Subtropical Storm Alberto made contact with the U.S., splashing into Laguna Beach, Fla., at the end of May before the calendar even noted the official June 1 start date of storm season. Through August, it was called the “season of slop,” seemingly confirming forecasts for below average cyclonic activity. 
But then September came, the Atlantic basin caught fire, and two coasts would face the terrifying power of wind and water. 
By the last day of the 2018 hurricane season on Friday, the cyclone scoreboard included 15 named storms, including eight hurricanes and two major hurricanes of Category 3 or higher. A normal season typically has 12 named storms, including six hurricanes and two major hurricanes."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/zz/news/20181130/2018-hurricane-season-ends-how-accurate-were-forecasters

Visit NOAA directly to read their summary
https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/destructive-2018-atlantic-hurricane-season-draws-to-end

Hurricane season 2018 ends
Hurricane season 2018 ends


"Hackers stole information on as many as 500 million guests of the Marriott hotel empire over four years, obtaining credit card and passport numbers and other personal data, the company said Friday as it acknowledged one of the largest security breaches in history. 
The full scope of the failure was not immediately clear. Marriott was trying to determine if the records included duplicates, such as a single person staying multiple times. 
The affected hotel brands were operated by Starwood before it was acquired by Marriott in 2016. They include W Hotels, St. Regis, Sheraton, Westin, Element, Aloft, The Luxury Collection, Le Méridien and Four Points. Starwood-branded timeshare properties were also affected. None of the Marriott-branded chains were threatened. 
The crisis quickly emerged as one of the biggest data breaches on record."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/zz/news/20181130/marriott-security-breach-exposed-data-of-up-to-500m-guests/1



"Sierra Nevada founder Ken Grossman sent letters to brewers across the country to invite them to participate in a collaborative brew day on Tuesday to brew the beer. They worked with malt and hop suppliers to provide ingredient donations so participating brewers could donate 100 percent of the sales of the beer to relief efforts. 
“We know that the rebuilding process will take time, but we’re in this for the long haul,” Grossman wrote in the announcement. “Our hope is to get Resilience IPA in taprooms all over the country to create a solid start for our community’s future.” 
In Massachusetts, at least 11 breweries have signed up to brew the Resilience IPA. 
For Wormtown Brewery in Worcester, it was an easy decision, brewmaster Ben Roesch said."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20181130/local-breweries-brew-beer-for-california-wildfire-relief

For more about Resilience IPA visit Sierra Nevada's page
https://sierranevada.com/resilience-butte-county-proud-ipa

For more about Resilience IPA visit Sierra Nevada's page
For more about Resilience IPA visit Sierra Nevada's page

Sunday, September 30, 2018

In the News: Gilberti leads the Walk to End Breast Cancer; trend shows more major hurricanes coming over time

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Surviving cancer is always worth celebrating, and helping to turn potential tragedy into a party is something the American Cancer Society’s Anne Gilberti has taken to be part of her job. 
In 2014, Gilberti took part in Avon 39 The Walk to End Breast Cancer. She wanted to continue the effort, but did not have someone to sponsor. 
“I didn’t really have a personal connection to breast cancer - I didn’t really know anyone with breast cancer,” she said. “Fast forward to the next year when the team I was part of was doing fundraising. That very night, I was waiting on my own biopsy and I was diagnosed with breast cancer.” 
Less than a year later, she didn’t realize she would be funding her own cause, as she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015. At the time of her diagnosis, she was a mother to three children, and knew she needed to be there for them."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20180929/franklin-resident-takes-own-strides-for-cancer

Donate to the cause by following the link
http://main.acsevents.org/site/TR/MakingStridesAgainstBreastCancer/MSABCCY18NER?pg=entry&fr_id=89577
Making Strides of Boston
Making Strides of Boston


"The Atlantic’s warmer waters triggered the unusual number of major hurricanes last year, according to a new study that predicts the region could see a couple of extra whopper storms each year by the end of the century. 
Six major hurricanes — with winds of at least 111 mph — spun around the Atlantic last year, including Harvey, Irma and Maria that hit parts of the United States and the Caribbean. Since 2000, the Atlantic has averaged three major hurricanes a year. Before that the average was closer to two. 
It may go up to five to eight major hurricanes a year around the year 2100, according to a study in this week’s journal Science. 
“We will see more active hurricane seasons like 2017 in the future,” said lead author Hiro Murakami, climate scientist and hurricane expert at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/zz/news/20180929/why-we-can-expect-more-whopper-hurricanes-in-coming-years

Visit the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for more info and to subscribe to weather alerts. https://www.noaa.gov/

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

In the News: Color run at FHS; 'cone of uncertainty' to be reduced

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"The high school’s students are making color of a dark situation with year’s second annual Mr. K’s Color Run. 
Proceeds from the May 19 5-kilometer race will be put into a scholarship fund named after late physics teacher Keiichi Kitanosono. The recipient will be chosen by the science department. 
Born in Japan and educated in the United States, Kitanosono was early into his second year of teaching in 2016. William Bobrowsky, the head of the science department, said that on Nov. 9, 2016, the 25-year-old Kitanosono failed to show up for work. It was later announced that he had died unexpectedly."
Race Canceled - confirmed 5/17/18
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20180417/franklin-high-color-run-to-honor-late-teacher



"The National Hurricane Center plans to shrink the dreaded “cone of uncertainty” during the upcoming season based on an improving forecast record. 
The Miami-based center made the announcement Monday, along with a series of other changes intended to improve how hurricane forecasters convey warnings to the public. Along with the shrinking cone, forecasters will extend advisories, which include warnings and watches, to 72 hours in advance of a storm, providing a full additional day to prepare. Experimental graphics used last year to depict arrival times for dangerous winds will also become a permanent addition to forecasts. 
“The changes are to improve information contained in the hurricane center products and to provide it in maybe easier to understand formats,” said Dan Brown, a senior hurricane specialist in charge of warning coordination. 
The forecast cone has long been a fixture of the hurricane forecasts but frequently debated because the public tends to focus on the center track, ignoring dangerous winds and other hazards that can extend for many more miles."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/zz/news/20180416/dreaded-cone-of-uncertainty-will-shrink-for-coming-hurricane-season

Additional details on the forecast changes for hurricane season can be found online
https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/news/NHC_new_products_and_services_2018_FINAL.pdf

The National Hurricane Center can be found https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/

The primary graphic displays the “earliest reasonable” arrival time
The primary graphic displays the “earliest reasonable” arrival time

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Historical Museum: Joe Landry presents "You Remember When" - Nov 19 - 1:15 PM

This will be the last presentation of the year of Joe's popular series of You Remember When. This presentation looks at the events of the year 1938, including the effects of the 1938 hurricane. Join us for an interesting and memorable look at Franklin's history.
Historical Museum: Joe Landry presents "You Remember When" - Nov 19 - 1:15 PM
Historical Museum: Joe Landry presents "You Remember When" - Nov 19 - 1:15 PM



Saturday, October 21, 2017

"You see your fellow Americans suffering, and we feel compelled to help”

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"Lt. Keith Darling sat in his office at the fire station on Friday afternoon listening to the scanner for the last time before he departs on his latest hurricane relief mission. On Sunday, he leaves for a two-week deployment to Puerto Rico to aid in the island’s restoration efforts in the wake of Hurricane Maria. 
Once Darling lands in the US territory, he is unclear of his next move. 
With pride and a bit of anxiety, Darling explained that he is not sure where on the island he would be or what he would be doing. He said there would more than likely be no electricity, which means no air conditioning, and no internet access for the most part. But most concerning to him, it means limited contact to his wife and two children. 
“I guess the biggest problem anyone would have trouble with is not knowing what’s going to happen,” he said."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20171021/franklin-firefighteremt-leaving-for-puerto-rico

devastation in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on Puerto Rico
devastation in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on Puerto Rico

Saturday, September 30, 2017

In the news: hurricane recovery collection; new Treasurer/Collector

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"The Greater Franklin Community can contribute to the recovery of areas affected by hurricane flooding now and at the church booth of Franklin’s Harvest Festival on Oct. 14. A donation box is located at the Franklin United Methodist Church, 82 W. Central St. 
Relief supplies will be sent to affected areas through the international aid group the United Methodist Committee on Relief. 
The church will be collecting items for cleaning buckets and health kits until Oct. 14 each Sunday from 8:45 a.m. until noon. The office is open Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings as well. The contribution of funds for others to complete these kits are tax deductible when marked “Advance #901570” in the memo and made out to the church."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170929/strongfranklin-united-accepting-donations-for-hurricane-victimsstrong

Franklin United Methodist Church, 82 W. Central St.
Franklin United Methodist Church, 82 W. Central St.


"Treasurer-Collector, Jim Dacey is retiring in November after 18 years on the job. Franklin resident and current assistant treasurer-collector, Kerri Bertone is due to take his place.
 
Bertone has lived in Franklin for 30 years, and has had a long career in private-sector finance. She was officially hired at the Town Council meeting earlier this week. 
Describe your career background. 
“I started as an administrative assistant with EMC corporation. Then I went to Putnam Investments when it was here in Franklin. ... I was with them for 21 years. They had a lot of work-life balance shifts, so I was able to work in the evening when my children were small."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170929/franklin-hires-new-treasurer-collector

Saturday, September 9, 2017

In the News: suicide prevention; gas prices

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"For some, a cry for help can come from a few taps on a touch screen. 
While suicide prevention phone lines have long provided an outlet for people seeking help in times of crisis, text-based help lines have become increasingly common in recent years. 
“We had kicked around the idea for a number of years because we had seen an ongoing transition of younger people who prefer to communicate by texting instead of with their voice over the phone,” said Steve Mongeau, executive director of Samaritans Inc. “For younger people, not just teens but people under the age of 30, we thought a text option might open up more of an opportunity.” 
Since October 2015, Boston-based Samaritans has provided text messaging support on the Massachusetts Statewide Helpline, 1-877-870-HOPE (4673). Helpline staff and trained volunteers have responded to more than 6,000 text messages, an average of close to 500 per month and growing."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required) 
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170908/suicide-prevention-text-lines-open-new-doors-to-help

Take a walk on the Town Common - World Suicide Prevention Day - Sep 10

Take a walk on the Town Common - World Suicide Prevention Day - Sep 10


"It could take several more weeks for gas prices to come back down to earth as oil refineries begin coming back online after Hurricane Harvey battered the Texas coast. 
“Harvey’s geographic path looks like it was crafted by the devil himself in terms of the impact on the refineries, said Tom Kloza, the global head of energy analysis for the Oil Price Information Service. “It lead to precautionary shutdowns of all Texas refineries, and, at worst, reduced about 40 percent of capacity east of the Rockies. In terms of scale, it was unprecedented.” 
In Massachusetts, gas prices surged 44 cents in the course of a week, according to AAA Northeast’s Sept. 5 survey of fuel prices. The $2.70 statewide average was the highest average price recorded in Massachusetts in two years, and the spike represents the sharpest increase since Hurricane Katrina lashed Louisiana in 2005."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required) 
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170908/gas-prices-expected-to-remain-high-for-several-weeks-following-hurricane