Showing posts with label immigrants. Show all posts
Showing posts with label immigrants. Show all posts

Saturday, May 28, 2022

“We are a nation of immigrants. We all benefit from increased public safety."

"One day after state legislators approved a bill to allow undocumented immigrants to get driver’s licenses in Massachusetts, Governor Charlie Baker vetoed the measure, saying it poses a risk to election security.

In a letter rejecting the legislation late Friday afternoon, Baker said the bill requires the Registry of Motor Vehicles “to issue state credentials to people without the ability to verify their identity” and “increases the risk that noncitizens will be registered to vote.”

He also expressed concern that the identification wouldn’t distinguish an undocumented person from a documented one."

Continue reading the Boston Globe article online (subscription may be required)

CommonWealth Magazine coverage

A Pass the Work and Family Mobility Act Rally was held on the steps of the Massachusetts State House on July 29, 2021. (Photo by Rose Lincoln)
A Pass the Work and Family Mobility Act Rally was held on the steps of the Massachusetts State House on July 29, 2021. (Photo by Rose Lincoln)

Thursday, January 21, 2021

CommonWealth Magazine: recent MA gaming revenue promising; questionable inaction on foreign trained medical Drs; Inauguration brings changes to MA immigrant status

 

"LAST WEEK’S REVENUE REPORT from the Massachusetts Gaming Commission suggested the state’s casinos are doing pretty well, given the many restrictions imposed by COVID-19.

Monthly slot revenues for the Commonwealth’s two category 2 casinos showed modest increases, with Encore Boston Harbor posting a 3.9 percent increase over November’s numbers, and MGM Springfield showing a 9.51 percent increase.  Plainridge Park, the state’s lone slots-only facility, reported a 20.77 percent increase in monthly slot revenue."
Continue reading the article online


"IN EARLY APRIL, amid the first COVID-19 surge and an emerging shortage of health care workers, Gov. Charlie Baker signed an executive order allowing foreign-trained medical doctors to gain full licensure here in Massachusetts.

This came after a slew of legislators and immigration advocates appealed to his administration to utilize that workforce. At the end of July, when cases of COVID-19 were ebbing, Baker rescinded the order, a move that allowed those who received their license during the previous three months to continue practicing but barred any new applications.

Now, with cases rising fast and the state once again facing a shortage of health care workers, the Baker administration has gone strangely silent on why the program isn’t being resuscitated and even expanded beyond doctors."

Continue reading the article online  https://commonwealthmagazine.org/health-care/baker-goes-silent-on-foreign-trained-docs/

 

"HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS of Massachusetts immigrants could be impacted by President Biden’s immigration overhaul, which includes a massive bill sent to Congress on Wednesday that was accompanied by a series of executive orders.

Those orders, signed after Biden assumed the presidency, will reverse Trump-era travel bans that focused primarily on immigrants from Muslim countries. Another executive order allows young immigrants brought into the country without authorization to once again apply for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program, which former president Trump suspended in 2017. A third will reverse a memo signed into law by Trump in 2020 that excluded undocumented immigrants from Census counts. "

Continue reading the article online 


Wednesday, July 15, 2020

In the News: "Trump administration rescinds rule on foreign students"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"Facing eight federal lawsuits and opposition from hundreds of universities, the Trump administration on Tuesday rescinded a rule that would have required international students to transfer or leave the country if their schools held classes entirely online because of the pandemic.

The decision was announced at the start of a hearing in a federal lawsuit in Boston brought by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. U.S. District Judge Allison Burroughs said federal immigration authorities agreed to pull the July 6 directive and “return to the status quo.”

A lawyer representing the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said only that the judge’s characterization was correct.

The announcement brings relief to thousands of foreign students who had been at risk of being deported from the country, along with hundreds of universities that were scrambling to reassess their plans for the fall in light of the policy."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20200714/trump-administration-rescinds-rule-on-foreign-students

State Rep Jeff Roy had shared the joint letter sent to the President on this matter last week  https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/07/state-rep-jeff-roy-we-made-bipartisan.html

Friday, July 10, 2020

State Rep Jeff Roy: "We made a bipartisan appeal to the President"

State Rep Jeff Roy tweets:
"We made a bipartisan appeal to the President to reconsider and rescind the new rules barring international students from the US if their school goes online. The policy is punitive, threatens safety, and will negatively affect our economy and university system."
The letter appealing to the President:

The President
The White House
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. President:

We are writing to respectfully request that you reconsider and rescind the new temporary final rules announced on Monday which prohibits international students from staying in the United States if they are enrolled in an American college or university that implements an online-only platform for instruction. We understand that the guidance also applies to an institution that moves to exclusively online mid-semester in response to rising COVID-19 cases

on campus, and to students who are living on campuses that are open, but offering classes online­ only to protect the health and safety of their faculty and campus community.

As you know, since March our colleges and universities have been in furious upheaval , navigating an unprecedented pandemic and formulating strategies to continue teaching students without putting them, faculty and staff at risk. Our institutions have sought to balance concerns for public health with their academic mission of teaching and scholarship. This work has been both difficult and costly, and the new rules will add more uncertainty and disruption. Moreover, the new rules leave international students with the choice of either transferring to another institution that provides in person or hybrid instruction , or to depart the country and risk not being able to return. Students who fail to comply with this guidance may face deportation.

We also note that the new rules were introduced without notice, without an opportunity for public comment, and put undo pressure on campuses to stay open when it is unsafe to do so. This comes at a time when the United States has been setting daily records for the number of new infections , with more than 300,000 new cases reported since July 1. And the policy effectively reverses course from the spring and summer, when ICE temporarily suspended pre­pandemic rules banning international students from residing in the U.S. and taking online-only courses.

More than a million international students come to the US every year to earn a degree that will help them land better jobs, and many remain in the US after graduation. They contribute to the cultural diversity of our campuses and many pay full tuition, which helps our institutions, especially in these times of economic difficulty and uncertainty. In Massachusetts there are 77,000 international students with active US study visas and another 32,000 in the rest of New England. Our state ranks fourth nationwide for its number of international students, and Northeastern University, with 16,000, ranks third in the country. Nationwide, international students contribute a $41 billion economic impact that supports more than 450,000 jobs. As one of our University Presidents observed, no public good is served by these efforts to deprive international students from continuing to make valuable and necessary contributions to the prosperity of the nation and the impact on the economic interests will be negative and potentially irreversible.

This policy is not only punitive to these international students, it also threatens the safety of other students and the communities surrounding college campuses. Additionally, transporting international students who may have been exposed to the coronavirus to other campuses or to airports to fly back to their home countries poses a myriad of health risks.

Finally, we understand that both Harvard University and MIT filed suit seeking a preliminary injunction this morning and I am sure others will follow. This litigation will be costly, will take time, and will waste precious judicial resources at a time when we should be focusing on rebuilding our nation.

Accordingly, we request that, in the best interest of our nation, you reconsider and rescind the temporary rules to help preserve our higher education system which is, indeed, the envy of the world.


Most respectfully,

Robert A. DeLeo 
Speaker of the House


Karen Spilka
Senate President

Jeffrey N. Roy 
House Chair, Committee on Higher Education

Anne Gobi
Senate Chair, Committee on Higher Education

Claire Cronin
House Chair, Committee on Judiciary

Paul McMurtry 
House Chair, Committee on Tourism, Arts and Cultural Development

Patricia A. Haddad 
Speaker Pro Tempore

Bradley H. Jones, Jr. 
House Minority Leader 20th Middlesex District

Alice H. Peisch 
House Chair, Committee on Education

Joanne M. Comerford
Senate Chair, Committee on Public Health

William H. Straus
House Chair, Committee on Transportation


Find the full PDF copy of this document
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1NJGsarPjRlHNP6A5bLFVAAhP2Y5A95l5/view?usp=sharing


Thursday, September 5, 2019

New MassBudget Report: "Sharing The Road"










  New MassBudget Report: "Sharing The Road"     

Sharing the Road: A chance to boost safety and economic prosperity in the Commonwealth  

Massachusetts is home to nearly 185,000 undocumented immigrants who form a crucial part of its workforce. But obstacles exist that prevent them from fully contributing to the Bay State economy. Providing undocumented immigrants with driver's licenses would boost the state's economy, lower premiums for other motorists, and make the Commonwealth's roads safer.

Our latest report, Sharing the Road, outlines the economic benefits of allowing all drivers to obtain licenses regardless of their immigration status. In the Commonwealth, undocumented immigrants drive to work, take their kids to school, and shop for groceries every day. But they face the constant risk of being pulled over and arrested for driving without licenses. Sharing the Road also chronicles the personal story of one undocumented Massachusetts resident who must navigate transportation without the benefit of a license.

New MassBudget Report: "Sharing The Road"
New MassBudget Report: "Sharing The Road"

"It's economically sensible, and simply the right thing to do, to permit undocumented residents in the Commonwealth to obtain driver's licenses," said Marie-Frances Rivera, president of MassBudget. "Licensing drivers without documents not only allows them and their families to access basic necessities, it also allows employers to access more qualified workers in our tight labor market."
The report also finds that:
  • Permitting undocumented Massachusetts residents to access licenses could generate $6 million in initial state revenue within the first three years of implementation.
  • Granting undocumented drivers access to licenses could reduce insurance premiums for all motorists, by about $20 per year. A change permitting undocumented residents to obtain licenses would also generate an estimated $62 million for insurance companies.
  • Public safety would improve. Licensing undocumented drivers ensures they are tested for basic knowledge of rules of the road and are less fearful of reporting crimes and crashes to law enforcement officers.
  • 14 other states, D.C., and Puerto Rico currently allow all drivers, regardless of immigration status, to obtain licenses.
The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget) produces policy research, analysis, and data-driven recommendations focused on improving the lives of low- and middle-income children and adults, strengthening our state's economy, and enhancing the quality of life in Massachusetts.

MASSACHUSETTS BUDGET AND POLICY CENTER

1 STATE STREET, SUITE 1250
BOSTON, MA 02109


Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 1 State Street, Suite 1250, Boston, MA 02109

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Thursday, August 15, 2019

MassBudget: Statement on Federal Public Charge Ruling










  MassBudget: Statement on Federal Public Charge Ruling     
August 13, 2019

Statement on Federal Public Charge Ruling 
Statement by Marie-Frances Rivera, President of the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget), in response to the Department of Homeland Security's release of the finalized rule on public charge: 

"President Trump's Department of Homeland Security yesterday released a rule that makes deeply troubling changes in our nation's immigration policies. The rule will make it very difficult for people who are not wealthy to receive a visa to immigrate to the U.S., become permanent residents (get a "green card"), or gain citizenship. 
This rule makes family income and the current and possible future use of benefits such as MassHealth (Medicaid), food stamps, or certain forms of subsidized housing grounds for being denied legal access to enter or stay in the U.S. This will push people into an impossible choice: forgoing critical supports for their families or risking the chance to remain in the U.S. 
This ruling puts the health and wellbeing of our communities in jeopardy. Many immigrants who are legally in the United States may fear accessing medical care and other basic supports that they need and are eligible for under federal law. 
People not directly subject to the rule may also fear that they should drop or avoid receiving those benefits. Our research indicates that such a rule change could cause as many as a half a million Massachusetts residents - including 160,000 children - to withdraw from needed benefits for fear of having an impact on a family member's immigration status.
Public benefits are tightly woven into the fabric and economy of our state. If we want our communities to thrive, everyone must be able to live without fear and get the care and support they need to remain healthy and productive. To deem a person unworthy to stay in this country due to their economic status puts a price tag on who is allowed to participate and thrive in our society - it obstructs racial and economic equity in our Commonwealth.
MassBudget is proud to stand with our recently emigrated neighbors, friends, colleagues, and family members who enrich our communities in countless ways. This rule, along with other harsh executive orders and actions by the Trump Administration, is part of a continued effort to provide opportunity for some, but not for all. It should be reversed as swiftly as possible."

Interested in learning more about public charge? Read our report on the "chilling effect" of this rule and its impact on Massachusetts here 
http://massbudget.org/report_window.php?loc=A-Chilly-Reception-Proposed-Immigration-Rule.html

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget) produces policy research, analysis, and data-driven recommendations focused on improving the lives of low- and middle-income children and adults, strengthening our state's economy, and enhancing the quality of life in Massachusetts.

MASSACHUSETTS BUDGET AND POLICY CENTER
1 STATE STREET, SUITE 1250
BOSTON, MA 02109


Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 1 State Street, Suite 1250, Boston, MA 02109


Sent by rwilliams@massbudget.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!

Thursday, November 15, 2018

MassBudget: Proposed "public charge" rule may stoke anxiety among current citizens as well as immigrants



  MassBudget: Proposed "public charge" rule may stoke anxiety among current citizens as well as immigrants     Proposed "public charge" rule
November 14, 2018




Proposed "public charge" rule may stoke anxiety among current citizens as well as immigrants

Our country has long welcomed and valued immigrants. But a "public charge" rule proposed by the Trump Administration could fundamentally change the nation's approach to immigration and could cause families to avoid or withdraw from necessary public benefits.
In its new brief, A Chilly Reception: Proposed Immigration Rule Creates Chilling Effect for New Immigrants and Current Citizens, the Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget) examines how Massachusetts might be affected by the proposed public charge rule. This rule would require immigrants applying for legal permanent residence (a "Green Card") to demonstrate that they have not, do not, and will not likely receive any of a list of publicly-funded benefits, including MassHealth (Medicaid) and SNAP ("food stamps").
Potentially 500,000 people in Massachusetts could withdraw from needed benefits out of fear or confusion about this rule that has not yet gone into effect. Of these, 160,000 are children, most of whom are U.S. citizens and not even directly affected by this proposed rule.
The proposed rule could directly affect people applying for a Green Card (or permanent residence), but similar standards would also apply to those seeking to extend a non-immigrant visa or change their temporary non-immigrant status in the U.S. (such as from a student visa to an employment visa).
Currently, the public charge determination only assesses whether an immigrant will rely primarily on government benefits for financial support. By contrast, the proposed new rule would require applicants to demonstrate that "they have not received, are not currently receiving, nor are likely in the future to receive public benefits," and the proposed rule would also significantly expand the list of public benefits taken into consideration when assessing whether someone might be deemed a "public charge." Reports indicate the "chilling effect" of this proposal has even reached immigrants on programs not on this list of potentially affected benefits.
The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget) produces policy research, analysis, and data-driven recommendations focused on improving the lives of low- and middle-income children and adults, strengthening our state's economy, and enhancing the quality of life in Massachusetts.

MASSACHUSETTS BUDGET AND POLICY CENTER
15 COURT SQUARE, SUITE 700
BOSTON, MA 02108


Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 15 Court Square, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02108

Sent by mrivera@massbudget.org in collaboration with
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Monday, October 29, 2018

"to apply for citizenship and getting a green card can take years"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"More than 700,000 immigrants are waiting on applications to become U.S. citizens, a process that once typically took about six months but has stretched to more than two years in some places under the administration of President Donald Trump. 
The long wait times have prompted some immigrant advocates to ask whether the delays are aimed at keeping anti-Trump voters from casting ballots in elections. 
“People are motivated to participate, and they’re being frustrated from being able to participate in the elections they’re excited about,” said Manuel Pastor, director of the University of Southern California’s Center for the Study of Immigrant Integration. 
The number of immigrants aspiring to become U.S. citizens surged during 2016, jumping 27 percent from a year earlier as Trump made cracking down on immigration a central theme of his presidential campaign. At first, the federal government kept up with the applications, but then the wait grew."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/zz/news/20181028/heres-how-long-it-takes-to-become-us-citizen

"to apply for citizenship and getting a green card can take years"
"to apply for citizenship and getting a green card can take years"

Monday, February 5, 2018

In the News: house fire on Warwick Rd; immigration plays role in economy

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Three people escaped and one dog was rescued from a two-alarm fire that ravaged a home on Warwick Road shortly before midnight Saturday. 
Firefighters found heavy fire coming from the garage of a split-level home at 13 Warwick Road after they were called at 11:52 p.m., according to a press release. 
The occupants — one adult and two children — left on their own. The adult was taken to Milford Regional Medical Center to be evaluated, according to the fire department. No other injuries were reported."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20180204/firefighters-rescue-dog-from-franklin-house-fire



"When he talks about the role immigration plays in the Massachusetts economy, Jeffrey Thielman points to the other side of the world. 
Look at Japan, he says. 
The population of the Pacific island nation is growing old at a tremendous rate - an issue that gave way to an employee shortage in the workforce. In December, the job-to-applicant ratio hit 1:59, essentially indicating there are two jobs available for every person who applies for one, according to a recent Reuters report. 
Thielman, the president and CEO of the International Institute of New England in Boston, said Japan is looking to immigration to solve its workforce woes."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20180204/how-immigrants-shape-local-economy

Saturday, October 21, 2017

Franklin Interfaith Council Presents Refugee Immigration Ministry

The Franklin Interfaith Council invites the community to a presentation by staff from Refugee Immigration Ministry (RIM), a nonprofit organization that supports immigrants and asylum seekers in partnership with local faith communities. Speakers from RIM will include Rev. Ruth Bersin, Executive Director and Rev. Isaac Seelan, Coordinator for Congregation Development.


When: October 30, 2017; 7:00 PM
Where: St Mary's Church, Lower Church Hall






Franklin Interfaith Council Presents Refugee Immigration Ministry
Franklin Interfaith Council Presents Refugee Immigration Ministry
For more about the Refugee Immigration Ministry  http://www.r-i-m.net/

Thursday, August 31, 2017

"the program cannot run on autopilot"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"Fear is growing in the immigrant communities in MetroWest and the Milford area who worry that President Donald Trump may dismantle an Obama-era program that offered protection to children who entered the U.S. illegally with their parents. 
Spearheaded by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, 10 Republican attorneys general have sent Trump an ultimatum: either he begins to dismantle the Deferred Action for Childhood program by Sept. 5 or they will challenge the program’s legality in court. 
Alice DeSouza, a Brazilian immigrant who owns a business on Milford’s Main Street, said she knows several people in town who rely on DACA and most of them are young. Without DACA, she wondered what its recipients might do, adding that it’s possible kids, teenagers and young adults, without work or school, could end up in trouble. 
“All these kids are working, they have to pay taxes,” she said. “It’s good for the country, it’s good for the government – then what’s the point (of removing it)?”

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
http://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20170830/locals-worried-uncertain-awaiting-trumps-plans-for-daca


"Jessica Vaughan of Franklin, director of policy studies for the Center for Immigration Studies, a nonprofit think tank that favors tighter immigration." is quoted in the article


Sunday, May 21, 2017

Franklin Republican Town Committee statement on Immigration Event Cancellation

"It is with regret that the Franklin Town Republican Committee announces the cancellation of Thursday night’s talk on immigration by a noted subject matter expert Jessica Vaughan. Due to gross and persistent misrepresentations about Ms. Vaughan and the nature of this event and the implicit threat of disruption by demonstrators and hecklers, our hosts at the Veterans of Foreign Wars who were well aware of the topic and speaker in advance cancelled the event.

Although Jessica has been a respected voice on news media outlets across the country and across the political spectrum -- and has testified before Congress -- she has somehow run afoul of the Southern Poverty Law Center, an organization funded in part by billionaire George Soros -- which has alleged, on what basis we can’t imagine, that Jessica is associated with or sympathetic to a “hate group.” Perhaps those peddling these untruths simply fear accurate information about an important subject in American life today.
 
What has happened to the America of Liberty Trees, Patrick Henry’s rousing “give me liberty or give me death,’ and the generations of Americans who risked and sometimes lost their lives fighting to protect our ideals and rights. Freedom of assembly and speech are first and foremost among the rights we all hold dear. So, it is with great sadness that we record the cancellation of this non-partisan event offered as a service to citizens. Intimidation, insinuation, and character assassination through prejudicial, inflammatory, and false language is now the rule rather than the exception. And, so often, particularly on college campuses, this is married to the implicit threat of violence and vandalism. These trends are a true threat to our country and our civil society. Sadly, today they arrived in Franklin with some local Democrats contributing."