Showing posts with label lesson learned. Show all posts
Showing posts with label lesson learned. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 9, 2021

@NewsLitProject - 8 tips to Google like a Pro

𝚂𝚑𝚊𝚎𝚕𝚢𝚗𝚗 𝙵𝚊𝚛𝚗𝚜𝚠𝚘𝚛𝚝𝚑 @ 🏠 (@shfarnsworth) tweeted on Mon, Jun 07, 2021:
"One of the most important ⭐️ skills to teach students... How to find information online.

Check out our NEW infographic from @NewsLitProject
in collab w/ @CindyOtis_ ⬇️

✅ 8 tips to Google like a Pro! #engchat #sschat #TLchat"

Image link = https://t.co/Zgrkx1nWkZ  
 
Shared from Twitter: https://twitter.com/shfarnsworth/status/1401975398884315137

@NewsLitProject - 8 tips to Google like a Pro
@NewsLitProject - 8 tips to Google like a Pro


Thursday, May 27, 2021

Lessons for Littles - June 6, 3:00 PM

Join Us for an Expert Panel Discussion on Racism for Parents of Young Children 

SUNDAY, JUNE 6  = 3:00–4:00 PM
Franklin Town Common & Virtual

How do you navigate conversations with your young children about topics such as race, diversity, inclusion and equity?

Join this free community event to learn from our panel of local experts when and how to have these important conversations with young children (0–8 years). Together, we can learn to raise kind, inclusive children who will know better and do better.

View & Share Event on Facebook = https://www.facebook.com/events/133800355442732

Attend in-person at the Franklin Town Common or virtually. 

For a reminder email and information on connecting to the event virtually, please fill out the form => https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScPl997Lsn75FOEUfnpeJnCUbH5xv4M-w7sk7NLrn_nyBsh8A/viewform

Presented by Franklin Area Moms and Franklin Area Against Racism.

Lessons for Littles - June 6, 3:00 PM
Lessons for Littles - June 6, 3:00 PM

 

Sunday, March 28, 2021

MA State News: Sen Finegold meets with Duxbury HS football team; lessons to learn from the pandemic

"Why does it matter to talk about the Holocaust?
Sen. Finegold reflects on discussion with Duxbury High School football team"

"EARLIER TODAY (Saturday, Mar 27, 2021) I had the opportunity to meet with members of the Duxbury High School football team. We had a great conversation, and I wanted to share a few reflections.

I spoke to the students about what being Jewish means to me. I told them how my Jewish faith helped me get through the loss of my sister Joni, who passed away at the age of 42 and left behind two young daughters. I also talked about the joy of being Jewish and about how I’m looking forward to celebrating Passover with my family tonight."

Continue reading the article online


"Lessons to learn from the pandemic"
"WHEN THE PANDEMIC passes, what then?  What will we do differently to expand opportunity to the most vulnerable and hardest hit?

We’ve seen the disparities.  Black Americans are 2.6 times more likely to get COVID-19 and more than two times more likely to die from it than white Americans, the Centers for Disease Control reports. Low-income residents and people of color have been the first to get sick and the first to lose their jobs, housing, and food security."
Continue reading the article online

Sunday, December 24, 2017

Franklin tackling school start times the people way

Franklin has started out on the right foot by inviting you, the stakeholders, to participate in the discussion and study to "study the feasibility of adjusting school start times in Franklin based on current research related to children and sleep."

You have likely heard that the Boston Public Schools attempted to take a systematic, yes, using a mathematical algorithm to develop school start times. The team was highly qualified but as the news has been touting left out conversations with all the stakeholders until after the new start times were developed. The Boston school start times implementation has now been canceled.

It will be different in Franklin. The stakeholders will be at the table first to study, review, discuss, and ultimately "present their findings and possible recommendations for the School Committee to consider."  


What does the timeline for the Advisory Committee look like?

  • Applications accepted through Jan 17, 2018
  • Committee appointments approved by School Committee at Jan 23, 2018 meeting
  • Advisory Committee starts work in Feb 2018
  • Meet approximately twice a month (one full group meeting, one subcommittee meeting), exact times and schedules TBD
  • Present recommendation to School Committee January 2019



You have several options:

  1. Sign up to take part as a member of the Advisory Committee (sign up info below)
  2. Participate in as many of the public meetings there will be to observe and have your say (meeting schedule TBD)
  3. Follow along as Franklin Matters reports on the meetings and progress of the Advisory Committee (subscribe via email to ensure you get all the info  http://www.franklinmatters.org/p/welcome.html)

I would encourage you to consider the first and second options. You can then also help to craft and add to the reporting on the third option.

The conversation about to begin will help Franklin prepare for what it will look like in 2028. What is 2028? The 250th anniversary of its founding.
http://www.franklinmatters.org/2017/11/what-will-franklin-be-like-in-2028.html


school start times would likely change the bus schedules. Boston attempted  to save money that way. What will happen in Franklin remains to be seen
school start times would likely change the bus schedules. Boston attempted
to save money that way. What will happen in Franklin remains to be seen.

------------

Hello

The purpose of the School Start Times Advisory Committee will be to study the feasibility of adjusting school start times in Franklin based on current research related to children and sleep. The Advisory Committee will be considering any proposed changes within the local context. Representatives from the Advisory Committee will present their findings and possible recommendations for the School Committee to consider. Changes to school start times, if any, are to be decided by the Franklin School Committee.

The commitment for this committee is expected to be two meetings per month, most likely in the evenings. The committee is planned for the 2018 calendar year, with a presentation to School Committee planned for January, 2019. All activities of this committee will be subject to the Open Meeting Law.

If you would like to apply to be a member of the Advisory Committee, please fill out this form. The deadline to complete this form is Wednesday January 17, 2018 at 5 PM. Appointment of committee members by School Committee is scheduled to be made at the January 23, 2018 School Committee meeting.


Click on this link to apply: https://goo.gl/forms/stAh38Ok8637KwkG2

Thank you,

Franklin Public Schools



Additional Resources


an archive of school start times articles
http://www.startschoollater.net/news-archives.html


The Boston School Superintendent statement on canceling the start times change  (subscription may be required)
http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/12/22/read-statement-from-tommy-chang-new-start-times/1gEkL1rxYy7M5JW3j08uwN/story.html


The Boston Globe article on canceling the start times change  (subscription may be required)
http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2017/12/22/boston-schools-boss-halts-plan-change-school-start-times/Z0pAKKcF3ggCL0mkgeBPiM/story.html

The Boston Globe article on the algorithm used to calculate the start time hours and resulting bus schedules  (subscription may be required)
https://www.bostonglobe.com/opinion/2017/12/22/don-blame-algorithm-for-doing-what-boston-school-officials-asked/lAsWv1Rfwqmq6Jfm5ypLmJ/story.html

Saturday, September 17, 2016

MassBudget: Reports Explore Lessons of New Census Data


  MASSBudget     



New Reports Explore Lessons of Newly Released Census Data
With the release this week of new Census Bureau data from the American Community Survey (ACS), it is clear that working families nationwide and here in Massachusetts made some important gains from 2014 to 2015 -- and that opportunities exist to build on these gains. MassBudget's new factsheet, U.S. and MA Households Make Meaningful Gains in 2015, explores what can be learned from this new data.

While the overall U.S. poverty rate declined meaningfully, there was no clear drop in the Massachusetts poverty rate. Median incomes saw strong growth in 2015 in the U.S. as a whole and somewhat more modest growth here in Massachusetts.

Poverty rates in Massachusetts and the U.S. as a whole remain well above pre-recession levels (2007), and median incomes remain below pre-recession peaks, underscoring the importance of policy improvements that can boost wages and incomes and make sure everyone -- including working families -- shares in the benefits of a growing economy.

In 2015 close to 1 in every 9 people in Massachusetts lived below the federal poverty threshold (which is roughly $24,000/year for a family of four). Only 12 other states had lower overall poverty rates in 2015. In the U.S., close to 1 in every 7 people lived below the poverty threshold in 2015.

Poverty remains more widespread for children than for adults in Massachusetts and in the U.S. -- and higher than pre-recession levels. The childhood poverty rate in Massachusetts remained virtually unchanged in 2015, with 1 in 7 children in poverty. MassBudget today has also released a factsheet on the new ACS kids' data, One in Seven Children in Massachusetts Still in Poverty; Almost All Have Health Insurance.

Today's Census data also tells an encouraging story about the effectiveness of federal and state safety net policies that help individuals and families pay for basic necessities. An official Supplemental Poverty Measure shows that programs such as Social Security, SNAP (food stamps), housing subsidies, and the Child Tax Credit move 38 million people above the poverty line. Together, these programs cut the poverty rate nearly in half.

Read MassBudget's new factsheet on income and poverty data from the Census ACS survey here (LINK).

Read MassBudget's new factsheet on child poverty and health insurance coverage, using this week's Census data here (LINK).

For more on this data and related data on wages, jobs and education, see the 2016 State of Working Massachusetts (LINK)

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget) produces policy research, analysis, and data-driven recommendations focused on improving the lives of low- and middle-income children and adults, strengthening our state's economy, and enhancing the quality of life in Massachusetts.

MASSACHUSETTS BUDGET AND POLICY CENTER
15 COURT SQUARE, SUITE 700
BOSTON, MA 02108
TwitterFacebook
Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 15 Court Square, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02108

Sent by nberger@massbudget.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact

Monday, May 23, 2016

Did you think of snow on Sunday?

Probably not. 

It was around 60 degrees and while overcast with occasional drizzle, there was no cold white snow to be seen in these parts. Some of the Franklin DPW team were thinking and learning about snow removal techniques: 

"Your DPW Snow Removal team is attending the National Snow and Ice conference this Sunday morning. This morning we will be participating in the Winter maintenance supervisor certificate program. This is a great opportunity for us to work with other DPW professionals from across the country on the latest technologies, techniques, and cost savings measures in snow and ice removal operations."
image from Franklin DPW Facebook posting
image from Franklin DPW Facebook posting

  • For more about the Franklin DPW your can visit their Facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/FranklinDPW/


  • or their website

http://town.franklin.ma.us/Pages/FranklinMA_PublicWorks/index

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Reminder: how to grow the best garlic


The Friends of Franklin Community Gardens will be holding a free class on how to plant garlic on October 4th, 2014 from 10am-11am at the King St. Community Garden in Franklin Massachusetts. 
We will be covering how and when to plant it, how to care for it in the spring, and how to harvest and cure it in the late summer. 
We will have organic garlic available for purchase at the event, and information for joining the wait list for the 2015 growing season for those interested in renting a bed.

A recent visit to the Community Garden showed that tomatoes did well this year.

one of the garden plots at the Franklin Community Garden
one of the garden plots at the Franklin Community Garden


Where is the Community Garden?  At the King St Memorial Park


Thursday, September 25, 2014

How to grow the best garlic


The Friends of Franklin Community Gardens will be holding a free class on how to plant garlic on October 4th, 2014 from 10am-11am at the King St. Community Garden in Franklin Massachusetts. 
We will be covering how and when to plant it, how to care for it in the spring, and how to harvest and cure it in the late summer. 
We will have organic garlic available for purchase at the event, and information for joining the wait list for the 2015 growing season for those interested in renting a bed.

A recent visit to the Community Garden showed that tomatoes did well this year.

tomatoes at one of the Community Garden plots
tomatoes at one of the Community Garden plots


Where is the Community Garden?  At the King St Memorial Park



Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Things don't always go as planned

Spending sometime in today's classroom environment would be rather interesting for most folks. Especially for those who claim to "have had 30 or more kids in their class and they did alright." Teaching in those days is considerably different from today.

  • There has been an increase in standards, 
  • There is more of a requirement to teach to the test
  • The students themselves are all post-Sesame Street

Coach Brown reflecting on a lesson plan that didn't work writes:
In the end, the lesson provided a decent idea of marginal analysis.  But it was clear that the lesson had little flow, was veering off track on every opportunity, and became a greater bane than a benefit to class time.  Was a total failure?  No, not by a long shot.  But by this point I want a certain vibe and flow to my class, and this new lesson didn’t provide that.  So it was a disappointment that I want to change before I teach it again in January to my next semester of Economics.  Hey newbs, even ten years in things will not always go as planned.  Get used to it and change it for next time.  You won’t have much time to mope about the negativity.  The next class begins in 7 minutes.  
Bold for my emphasis. Read the full posting here:
http://ukiahcoachbrown.blogspot.com/2010/09/clunk.html

Read more of Coach Brown here:
http://ukiahcoachbrown.blogspot.com/


Franklin, MA

Friday, April 24, 2009

Columbine lessons still resonate

Sent to you by Steve Sherlock via Google Reader:

via Franklin School Committee by Jeffrey Roy on 4/24/09
My vacation week read this year was Dave Cullen's excellent work entitled Columbine. It's an indelible portrait of the killers, the victims, and the community that suffered one of the greatest tragedies of the 20th century. This book was released nearly 10 years after the event, and is a riveting page turner which [...]

Things you can do from here:

Thursday, June 12, 2008

Override failure reasons - my 2 cents

Why did the override fail?

By the numbers, 1600 yes votes from last year did not vote yes this year:
  • 500 of them chose to vote no.
  • Just over 1000 stayed home and chose not to vote at all.
What happened to these yes votes?

I think there are a number of reasons.

Apathy is always a factor - "My vote won't make a difference." On a national scale, the individual vote does not count for a whole lot. On the local scale, one vote is ONE vote.

Town priorities - The school budget is always a town matter. The School Department and Superintendent are properly advocates for what they need. The Finance Committee provides some oversight and validation but the ultimate responsibility lies with the Town Council. So while this year (and last) the School Committee brought forth what they needed to maintain the level of education that they were providing, the Town Council chose to follow the beat of their own drummer. Last year the Town planned for the override in advance and included town operations in the override amount. This year, the Town set the schools up on their own and only allowed an override when forced by the School Committee and the presence of growing support within the community. Alas, the support was not enough to carry all the way through.

Mis-information - The hearsay, mis-information and inaccuracies were prevalent in the community discussions. Trying to get the proper information out to the folks was like swimming against the riptide. The Milford Daily News closed out anonymous comments the day after the vote but the damage was done. The constant naysayers were abusive and out in force. Heaven forbid, you try to get a word in edgewise. The key point on this is the difference between a capital expense and an operational expense. Clearly, the majority of Franklin voters don't understand or appreciate the difference.

The 5 Year Plan - This is another aspect of the Town priorities but an important one. This item was brought up several times during the healthy discussion during the Override of 2007. Everyone agreed it was a good thing to do. During the ensuing year, the Town Council did nothing. They instead chose to sit on the school budget problem and hid it from the voters during the November election. That was more important. Some of the councilors chose to break their own by-laws and put up their election signs for the November election in advance of when they were supposed to. That was more important. Some of those councilors chose to make take pot shots at the School Administration and School Superintendent. Sound bites travel well especially when they are unfounded. Finally, the Town Council appointed a committee to develop a long range plan the week before this years override. Too little too late.

State money - The Town has gotten too used to the largess of the commonwealth and the ability of our local representatives to tap the coffers to fill the Franklin revenue needs. The decade plus time of increasing state aid is likely behind us. Other towns are recognizing what we have benefited from and getting jealous. We could make a case for the increases with a growing enrollment. The enrollment growth is tapering off and so will the state funds. The unwillingness of the Franklin tax payer to dip into their own pocket got proved again. Only one operational override has successfully passed. Don't ask a Franklinite to take money out of their pocket for something they should pay for. If the state won't pay for it, Franklin certainly won't.


I believe the Franklin voters who did not cast their ballots will come to regret their decision. The days of Franklin being selected in Top 10 or Top 100 are over. Digging out of this hole will be the hardest thing to do.

The task of the Five Year Plan Committee will be immense. We, the voters, will have a chance of getting a decent plan. There are two "normal, everyday citizens" on the committee along with the elected and appointed officials. We will have to monitor the committee to ensure that they are open and doing something productive. We can not let the Town Council let this opportunity sit idle.


What can we learn from the failure?

Personally, letting others direct the conversation, reporting the facts, hoping for the best doesn't work.

Action will be required. The level of engagement in the town meetings (especially the Town Council) needs to increase.

You, yes you! Don't sit at home and let the talking heads babble on. Make the effort. Go to the Council Chambers. Show them that there are real live people for whom they should care about what they do. Hold them accountable.

Conversation about what is happening needs to maintain some focus on the real issues. Don't let the agenda hide some items. Ask where is it? Ask what is happening? Ask why?

Together we can come out of the hole. Or separately, we can see our home values decline, or students fall behind, our future dim.

This is our choice.

What choice will you make?

How much does Franklin matter to you?