Showing posts with label early voting. Show all posts
Showing posts with label early voting. Show all posts

Wednesday, September 15, 2021

Franklin Matters Radio shows scheduled for Wednesday, Sep 15 and Saturday, Sep 18

The Franklin Matters Radio shows scheduled for Wednesday, September 15 and Saturday, September 18 are the following:


Wednesday
  • 9:00 AM / Noon / 6:00 PM  =  FM_#600_HealthDir-CLiberty_20210831 (~ 33 mins)
  • 11:00 AM / 2:00 PM / 8:00 PM  =  FM_#601_TC-NDanello_#602_DSpencer_Combo combination   (~ 45 mins) 

Saturday

The Health Director Cathleen Liberty meeting repeats on Saturday at 9:00 AM and Town Clerk Nancy Danello election info and SchComm candidate Denise Spencer sessions combined repeats at 3:00 PM.


You can also find each segment separately in your favorite podcast app or in the Franklin Matters Radio archive -> https://www.franklinmatters.org/p/fm-podcasts.html 


Franklin Matters Radio shows scheduled for Wednesday, Sep 15 and Saturday, Sep 18
Franklin Matters Radio shows scheduled for Wednesday, Sep 15 and Saturday, Sep 18

Tuesday, September 14, 2021

FM #601 - Acting Town Clerk with things to know about Nov 2, 2021 - 09/10/21 (audio)

FM #601 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, number 601 in the series. 


This shares my conversation with acting Town Clerk Nancy Danello. We used a conference bridge to review the timeline and other key matters for the Franklin local election scheduled for Nov 2, 2021.


We cover the following key topics

  • Candidate papers due Sep 14, Last day to withdraw Sep 30

  • Ballots got to print Oct 1, Ballots available (TBD but likely by the end of the week of Oct 4)

  • Early voting - (start TBD - depending upon ballots) 

    • in Town Clerk’s office during normal business hours

    • Sat Oct 23, Sun Oct 24 - time to be confirmed

  • Absentee ballot applications available now

  • Election Day - Nov 2, 2021


The show notes include links to the Town Clerk page and other election information.


Our conversation runs about 19 minutes, so let’s listen in to my conversation with Nancy Danello.  Audio File -> https://player.captivate.fm/episode/c793b405-fe66-4ee5-a1f1-c74d2e398216



--------------


Town Clerk’s page ->  https://www.franklinma.gov/town-clerk 


Register to vote ->   https://www.sec.state.ma.us/OVR/ 


Election timeline  ->   https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/g/files/vyhlif6896/f/uploads/2021_biennial_town_election_-_important_dates.docx.pdf 


Franklin Matter’s election collection for 2021 ->  https://www.franklinmatters.org/2021/07/franklin-election-collection-2021.html   


-------------

We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial. 


This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.

 

How can you help?

  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors

  • If you don't like something here, please let me know


Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.

 

For additional information, please visit Franklinmatters.org/  or www.franklin.news 


If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com


The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.


I hope you enjoy!

------------------


You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"

 

Acting Town Clerk with things to know about Nov 2, 2021
Acting Town Clerk with things to know about Nov 2, 2021


Saturday, July 31, 2021

MMA: "Gov. signs law extending voting provisions through Dec. 15"

From the Mass Municipal Association (MMA) we share: 

"Gov. Charlie Baker today signed a $261.6 million supplemental budget for fiscal 2021 that includes provisions to extend early voting through Dec. 15, 2021.

With regard to elections, the new law:

• Extends no-excuse absentee voting for all elections through Dec. 15, 2021
• Authorizes in-person early voting for any regular or special municipal preliminary, primary or general election on or before Dec. 15, 2021
• Authorizes early voting by mail for any regular or special or state preliminary primary or general election on or before Dec. 15, 2021
• Extends the right of voters ordered to quarantine to select an alternative location for delivery of ballots for annual or special municipal or state primary or election held on or before Dec. 15, 2021
• Allows a select board, board of selectmen, town council or city council — after a public hearing and by recorded and public vote at least 45 days prior to the date of an election — to opt-out of allowing early voting by mail for any annual or special municipal preliminary or municipal election"

Direct ink to the legislative bill -> https://malegislature.gov/Bills/192/H3973

MMA: "Gov. signs law extending voting provisions through Dec. 15"
MMA: "Gov. signs law extending voting provisions through Dec. 15"


Friday, June 11, 2021

MA Senate Votes to Extend Popular State of Emergency Measures; Sends to MA House

Today (06/10/21), the Massachusetts State Senate passed a bill which would extend a slate of measures instituted in Massachusetts during the State of Emergency stemming from COVID-19. If signed into law, this bill would result in the included measures being temporarily extended beyond the State of Emergency’s expiration on June 15, 2021.

 

“The end of the State of Emergency in Massachusetts is both a testament to how far we’ve come and a reminder of the work that lies ahead as we seek a robust recovery equitable to all residents” stated Senate President Karen E. Spilka (D-Ashland). “Massachusetts’ recovery will depend on our ability to respond to the lessons of the pandemic, in such areas as housing, healthcare, the restaurant industry and civic and community engagement. Today’s legislation keeps these conversations going and addresses the future of some of the most popular new ideas that have been embraced during the pandemic. Some of the included measures, like mail-in voting and greater access to public meetings, are not merely convenient but are crucial for the continued health of our democracy. I’m grateful for the work of Chair Rodrigues and the Committee on Ways and Means for moving this important bill forward swiftly.”

 

Many of the extended measures deal with elections and public meetings. Under the bill, mail-in voting would be extended in Massachusetts until December 15, 2021, giving voters flexibility and more opportunity to participate in upcoming fall elections. With municipal approval, early in-person voting could be extended through the same date.

 

Public bodies subject to the open meeting law would be able to continue holding meetings remotely until April 1, 2022. Similarly, remote town meetings would remain an option for Massachusetts municipalities through December 15, 2021, and quorum requirements for town meetings would be eased. Nonprofits and public corporations would be able to hold meetings remotely until December 15, 2021.

 

“Extending these emergency measures will allow municipalities, restaurants, businesses, and residents the flexibility they need to adapt as we continue on the path toward our new normal and we get back to a new better,” stated Senator Michael J. Rodrigues (D-Westport), Chair of the Senate Committee on Ways and Means. “Thank you to Senate President Spilka for her steady leadership and thank you to my colleagues in the Senate for moving quickly to support citizens of the Commonwealth.”

 

Also included in the bill are measures relative to restaurant operations. The legislation would allow municipalities to approve and extend permits for outdoor dining through April 1, 2022. Restaurants would also be permitted to offer alcoholic beverages, including mixed drinks, for off-site consumption with the purchase of food until March 1, 2022.

 

The bill also extends certain protections afforded to tenants during the pandemic. Among these is the requirement that a ‘notice to quit,’ including information on tenants’ rights as well as methods for seeking legal and financial assistance, be served to tenants prior to an eviction. Such notices will continue to be required until at least January 1, 2023. Furthermore, the legislation would also extend hardship protections to persons facing eviction by continuing the court practice of offering temporary continuances to tenants who have filed applications for rental assistance, thereby preventing unnecessary evictions in cases where tenants are unable to pay rent due to COVID-19-related financial hardship. This statutory requirement would have expired on June 15, 2021 and instead will be extended until April 1, 2022.

 

“We learned a lot during the COVID experience, and we may be able to use some of those lessons going forward. This legislation gives us the time to sort out which changes we should make permanent,” stated President Pro Tempore Senator William Brownsberger (D-Belmont).

 

“This bill represents responsible and proactive action by the Senate to ensure that important safeguards remain in place after June 15th,” said Senator Cindy F. Friedman (D-Arlington), Vice Chair of the Senate Committee on Ways and Means. “The effects of this public health crisis are not over; we must continue to protect the public’s health and well-being. This bill maintains the rapid availability of our strong health care workforce and provides financial support to those most impacted by the pandemic, like those who struggle to secure adequate childcare as in-person work resumes. I thank Senate President Spilka, Chair Rodrigues, and my senate colleagues for their speedy and thoughtful effort in addressing these matters.”

 

“The bill the Senate passed today recognizes that for many people in Massachusetts, the pandemic is far from over,” said Senator Joanne M. Comerford (D-Northampton). “By extending many of these emergency provisions, we can assure people that many of the important protections such as those having to do with public health, remote participation in civic life, outdoor dining, and protections against evictions will remain in place.”

 

In an amendment proposed by Senator Jehlen and adopted during debate, a lack of access to childcare will not prohibit someone from collecting unemployment benefits from continuing to access those benefits.  This practice, initiated during the pandemic and otherwise set to expire on June 15, 2021 will continue until federal unemployment protections expire in September. 

 

Finally, the Senate extended several measures to ensure that sufficient workforce and access to necessary healthcare services remain to address the needs of the Commonwealth during the continuing public health emergency. In a move which fulfills the Senate’s stated commitment to supporting telehealth’s inclusion as a healthcare option for Massachusetts residents, a requirement that certain in-network telehealth services be reimbursed at the same rate as equivalent in-person services would be extended until at least December 15, 2021.

The bill now goes to the House of Representatives. 


Wednesday, May 12, 2021

MA News: "Judge dismisses lawsuit seeking to overturn 2020 state election results"

 

"A JUDGE has thrown out a challenge of the 2020 state election results that was filed by five losing Republican candidates.

Former congressional candidates John Paul Moran and Caroline Colarusso, state Senate candidate Steven Hall, and state representative candidates Ingrid Centurion and Craig Valdez had challenged the state law that allowed voters to vote by mail for any reason during the COVID-19 pandemic. They asked a judge to overturn the November 2020 election results, order a new election, and prevent Secretary of the Commonwealth William Galvin from implementing a variety of voting practices in the future, including mail-in ballot applications and voting and early voting (which has existed for several election cycles).

Worcester Superior Court Judge Janet Kenton-Walker ruled Monday that the challenge is no longer relevant. She granted a motion to dismiss the lawsuit that was filed by Attorney General Maura Healey on behalf of Galvin and Gov. Charlie Baker."
Continue reading the article online
 

Sunday, March 14, 2021

MA Legislature Extends Vote-By-Mail Through June

The Massachusetts House of Representatives and state Senate on Thursday March 11, 2021, passed legislation to extend mail-in voting and early voting options for elections held through the end of June 2021. The vote-by-mail provision was previously set to expire at the end of March 2021.

“As other states across our country work to disenfranchise their voters, I am proud Massachusetts is choosing to extend and enhance efforts to ensure every eligible resident can exercise their fundamental right to cast a ballot in our local elections, stated Senate President Karen E. Spilka (D-Ashland). “With a record number of ballots casted in 2020, our successful vote-by-mail system increased access and protected our most vulnerable residents from putting their health at risk. I would like to thank Senators Rodrigues, Finegold, Lewis and Creem  as well as Speaker Mariano and my colleagues in the House for their collaboration on this bill and look forward to this extension of voting options becoming law.”

“During this pandemic, our vote-by-mail system has proved to be an accessible and secure tool for voters to exercise their right to vote without putting their health at risk,” said Speaker of the House Ronald J. Mariano (D-Quincy). “We are glad to have passed this extension that will allow cities and towns to continue offering vote by mail and other voting options for their upcoming elections. I thank my fellow members in the House, and Senate President Spilka and our state senators for their collaboration in getting this bill to the Governor’s desk. We must continue to explore options that encourage and empower voters to be active participants in our democratic process, and I look forward to working with Chairs Aaron Michlewitz and Daniel Ryan in legislation that will make vote by mail permanent in Massachusetts.”

“Ensuring access to the polls is a vital part of democracy, and I am happy that the Legislature has taken this important step to ensure upcoming local elections can move forward safely without disruption,” said Senator Michael J. Rodrigues (D-Westport), Chair of the Senate Committee on Ways and Means. “Thank you to Senate President Spilka and Senator Finegold for their leadership on this issue, and thank you to my colleagues in the Legislature for supporting equitable access to voting for all residents of the Commonwealth, including individuals with disabilities.”

“By passing this short-term extension of the vote by mail reforms the Legislature enacted last year, we are ensuring that cities and towns will be able to provide voters with safe and easy access to the ballot box this Spring,” said Representative Aaron Michlewitz, Chair of the House Committee on Ways & Means (D-Boston). “Later this session I look forward to working with my colleagues in the Legislature to make these reforms permanent, so that these measures will continue to safeguard our elections and guarantee that our democratic process will not be hampered by this or any future public health crisis.” 

“This legislation will help ensure that residents can continue to vote safely and easily during the ongoing pandemic,” said Senator Barry R. Finegold (D-Andover), Senate Chair of the Joint Committee on Election Laws. “Last year, the Legislature passed a common-sense, bipartisan bill to expand early voting and implement a secure vote-by-mail system for elections in 2020. These reforms protected public health, empowered voters, and helped generate record-breaking turnout. I am glad that the Legislature is temporarily extending mail-in voting through the end of June, and I look forward to working with my colleagues and local election officials on legislation to make vote-by-mail permanent.”     

‘Over this past year, the COVID pandemic has caused us to take a closer look at, and improve upon, many of our society’s systems. Voting is one of those,” said Representative Daniel J. Ryan, House Chair of the Joint Committee on Election Laws (D-Boston). “I applaud Chairman Michelwitz and my House and Senate colleagues for working swiftly to extend vote-by-mail and other safety precautions through this spring’s elections. I especially want to thank Speaker Mariano for his leadership on these ballot access measures and his bold commitment to work toward their permanency. I’m looking forward to a robust discussion on how to best move election legislation forward.’

“Voting reforms like mail-in voting and expanded early in-person voting have been critical to ensuring that all voters can safely and conveniently exercise their right to vote during the pandemic,” said Senator Jason Lewis (D-Winchester), lead Senate sponsor of the legislation. “I’m very grateful to my colleagues in both the House and Senate for the strong bipartisan support of this bill and look forward to working together to hopefully pass further legislation later this session to make these voting reforms permanent.”

“Vote by mail and early voting options have allowed us to conduct safe elections during the pandemic while also expanding voter participation,” said Senate Majority Leader Cindy Creem (D-Newton).  “By extending these options today, this bill ensures that we can conduct safe, secure municipal elections this spring without limiting anyone’s access to the ballot box.”

The bill also allows municipalities to provide residents with the option to vote early in-person in these elections. Additionally, the legislation requires local election officials to make reasonable efforts to grant accommodations for voters with disabilities who might have difficulty accessing a paper mail-in ballot and request an accommodation. Furthermore, cities and towns can postpone municipal elections and caucuses scheduled before June 30, 2021 until August 1, 2021.

The bill now advances to the Governor for consideration.

MA Legislature Extends Vote-By-Mail Through June
 MA Legislature Extends Vote-By-Mail Through June


Monday, December 28, 2020

CommonWealth Magazine: steps to boost voting rights; let MA home bakers do their thing

 From CommonWealth Magazine:

"3 steps Mass. should take to boost voting rights
Too many of the state’s voters are disenfranchised"

"SINCE THE SHOT heard around the world at the battle of Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts has been at the forefront of modern democracy. The Massachusetts Constitution – which was drafted by John Adams – formed the model for the United States Constitution and remains the oldest continuously-operating constitution in the world. Despite this history of democratic leadership, in recent years Massachusetts has fallen behind other states in ensuring that all eligible voters can register, vote, and have their votes count. The upcoming legislative session is an opportunity to change that and build on the work done in 2020 to open up voting to more people during the pandemic.

It was encouraging that Massachusetts leaders, like those in many other states, took important steps this year to expand early voting and to send vote-by-mail applications to every registered voter."

Continue reading the article online
 
"Let Mass. home bakers do their thing
Patchwork of regulations make starting a business difficult"
"RETIRED SALON OWNER and daycare provider Marcia Donnelly did not want to fight City Hall. She just wanted to sell home-baked sourdough bread from her kitchen in Southbridge.

Homemade food businesses are common and easy to start in 48 states, and have become increasingly popular during COVID-19. Worried about global supply chains and general uncertainty, the pandemic has boosted demand for fresh, locally sourced products. Unfortunately, Massachusetts has resisted the trend, along with New Jersey. “It was a battle from the get-go to set up my business,” Donnelly says."
Continue reading the article online


Saturday, December 26, 2020

Washington Post: "Five myths about voting machines"

From The Washington Post, an article of interest for Franklin:

President Trump is still pretending that he won last month’s election, insisting falsely that only massive fraud made it appear that President-elect Joe Biden won. Many of his claims, and the even more baroque allegations of his supporters, have focused on voting machines — part of the electoral system that most people don’t spend much time thinking about. Here are some of the biggest myths circulating about them now.

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
 

Monday, November 2, 2020

Franklin Voters: Election 2020 reminders

The early voting period completed Friday (Oct 30) at noon time.
 
If you have not sent in your mail ballot, please drop it off at the Municipal Building in the drive through (from 8 AM to 8 PM) or leave it in the dropbox at the Municipal Building.

If you plan on voting in person, all precincts vote in one location: Franklin High School. Parking should be available. It is a professional development day for the district, teachers may be around but no students.

Poll hours are from 7:00 AM to 8:00 PM. (Note: this is a change as most prior elections open at 6 AM but not this time. Plan accordingly.)

According to the Town Clerk, more than 50% of the registered Franklin voters have already cast their ballots (via mail or early vote) so while it will be busy (10,000 plus voters anticipated) it shouldn't be too crazy.

If you need information to prepare to cast an informed vote, the Franklin voters guide can be found here:  https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/10/franklin-community-voting-guide.html

Info on Ballot Question 3 - Community Preservation Act can be found here

The "election collection" of all the posts from the Primary through today can be found here:  https://www.franklinmatters.org/2020/08/2020-election-collection.html



voting booths at FHS, taken during an observation period this weekend
voting booths at FHS, taken during an observation period this weekend

If you do have vision problems, there is a special machine to help you. Check with one of the election workers as you enter the high school 

there is a special machine to help you if you have vision problems
there is a special machine to help you if you have vision problems

 


Friday, October 30, 2020

Franklin's Weekend - Oct 30-Nov 1, 2020

The final Farmers Market of this season on the Town Common. Last day for early voting (9 AM only to noon at Franklin High School). The Pumpkin Patch is open at St John's Episcopal Church Friday and Saturday with a costume contest to help close out the festivities there.

And then we turn the clocks BACK  an hour on Saturday night.

* Friday, October 30
9:00am -  Early voting
12:00pm -  Farmers Market
5:00pm -  Pumpkin Patch @ St John's
 
* Saturday, October 31
 Halloween
9:00am -  Advanced Depositing Of Early Voted Ballots
12:00pm -  Pumpkin Patch @ St John's
 
* Sunday, November 1
 Daylight Saving Time ends
9:00am -  Advanced Depositing Of Early Voted Ballots

 

 
If you have an event to add to the calendar, you can use the form to submit it for publication:  https://forms.gle/oPdi8X3ZbHHyrHzo6
 
Community Calendar
Community Calendar

 

Saturday, October 24, 2020

Town of Franklin, MA: Early voting, drive through window schedule

Early voting is available this weekend!  

You can also drop your ballots off in the drive-thru at the Municipal Building during extended hours, or drop in the White Mailbox! 

https://www.franklinma.gov/town-clerk  #vote #elections2020 

Shared from Twitter:  https://t.co/FsWZKHSAxo

Town of Franklin, MA: Early voting, drive through window schedule
Town of Franklin, MA: Early voting, drive through window schedule



Town of Franklin, MA: Early voting, drive through window schedule
Town of Franklin, MA: Early voting schedule

Thursday, October 22, 2020

Town of Franklin: Notice of Advanced Removal of Early Voted Ballots From Envelopes and Advanced Depositing of Early Voted Ballots

In accordance with the Secretary of State Regulations 47.12 and under the provisions of section 7 (k) of Chapter 115 of the Acts of 2020, the Town of Franklin will be opening early voted ballots at the Franklin High School, 218 Oak Street at the following sessions:

  •     Sunday, October 25th    10:00 AM
  •     Monday, October 26th    9:00 AM
  •     Tuesday, October 27th    9:00 AM
  •     Wednesday, October 28th    9:00 AM
  •     Thursday, October 29th    9:00 AM
  •     Friday, October 30th    9:00 AM

In accordance with the Secretary of State Regulations 47.12 and under the provisions of section 7 (k) of Chapter 115 of the Acts of 2020, the Town of Franklin will be depositing early voted ballots at the Franklin High School, 218 Oak Street at the following sessions:

  •     Saturday, October 31st    9:00 AM
  •     Sunday, November 1st    9:00 AM

We respectfully ask that observers register by emailing townclerk@franklinma.gov in advance of all early voted ballots sessions.

In accordance with the Regulations 47.12 and the provisions of section 7 (k) of Chapter 115 of the Acts of 2020, no results shall be determined or announced until after the time the polls close on November 3rd. At that time the results from the advance processed ballots will be added to the election day results and posted in a public place.


355 East Central St., Franklin Ma. Main Line - 508-520-4900/e-mail- townclerk@franklinma.gov 

Notice of Advanced Removal of Early Voted Ballots
Notice of Advanced Removal of Early Voted Ballots


Tuesday, October 20, 2020

In the News: "Secretary Galvin expects historical turnout to exceed 2016"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"Voter turnout for the Nov. 3 election is projected to be double the record-setting number of ballots cast in the Sept. 1 state primaries, and even exceed the historical 75% voter turnout in the 2016 election.

Secretary of State William F. Galvin said more will be known about the expected high turnout in the next week as early voting began Saturday and will continue through Oct. 30.

“I’m hopeful. It seems the level of interest is there,” Galvin said in a telephone interview last week. “We had 3.3 million votes in 2016. It seems we will exceed that. We’ve seen a continuing rising number of people registering to vote.”

The historical voter turnout — expected as well in some other parts of the country and driven by the hotly contested presidential race — is also the result of a massive expansion of mail-in voting due to concerns about crowded polling places during the coronavirus pandemic."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
 
When I talked with Town Clerk Nancy Danello at FHS on Monday, over 1,400 had already been to early vote on Sat-Sun and mid-day Monday. Over 12,000 mail ballots were sent out to registered Franklin voters.

The deadline to register to vote is Oct. 24.  Visit the Town Clerk page for office hours to register in person  https://www.franklinma.gov/town-clerk  or register online  https://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/eleidx.htm

 

the early voting schedule for Franklin
the early voting schedule for Franklin

Friday, October 16, 2020

Franklin early voting opens Saturday, Oct 17

Early Voting:  FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL  (2 weeks) starting   Saturday, Oct. 17th through Friday, Oct. 30th
  • Saturday, Oct. 17th and Sunday, Oct. 18TH   10 AM - 3 PM
  • Monday, Oct 19th   9 AM - 3 PM
  • Tuesday, Oct. 20th 9 AM - 3 PM
  • Wednesday, Oct. 21st 9 AM - 5 PM
  • Thursday, Oct. 22nd 9 AM - 3 PM
  • Friday, Oct. 23rd  9 AM - noon
  • Saturday, Oct. 24th and Sunday, Oct. 25th   10 AM - 3 PM
  • Monday, Oct 26th  9 AM - 3 PM
  • Tuesday, Oct. 27th 9 AM - 3 PM
  • Wednesday, Oct. 28th 9 AM - 5 PM
  • Thursday, Oct. 29th 9 AM - 3 PM
  • Friday, Oct. 30th 9 AM - noon

 

**STATE ELECTION – Tuesday, November 3rd, 7 am – 8 pm FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL GYM**

Franklin early voting opens Saturday, Oct 17
Franklin early voting opens Saturday, Oct 17

 

Tuesday, October 6, 2020

In the News: "The system isn’t broken right now"

From the Milford Daily News, an article of interest for Franklin:

"Question 2 on the Tuesday, Nov. 3 ballot asks the Massachusetts electorate to adopt ranked-choice voting for nearly all federal and state races — excluding U.S. president — that result in a single winner.

A “yes” vote on the binding referendum supports replacing the plurality-voting system in place with ranked choice voting. A “no” vote opposes changing the existing plurality voting.

If Question 2 passes, ranked-choice voting would be implemented for the primary and general elections in 2022. It would come into play when three or more candidates compete in a single-seat election.

Yes on 2 proponents pitch ranked-choice as a remedy to plurality-voting problems — chiefly split voting and spoiler candidates — in crowded Massachusetts elections."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

I am still not convinced of the proposed benefits for ranked choice voting. If I were to schedule a Zoom conference bridge to talk through the pros and cons would you be interested? It wouldn't be recorded, but we (whomever shows up) could discuss this topic. Let me know if you are interested via email or comment.


The Franklin Community Voting Guide for November 2020 is ready for your use to prepare to vote.

In the News: "The system isn’t broken right now"
In the News: "The system isn’t broken right now"



Monday, October 5, 2020

Franklin Community Voting Guide - November 2020

The Franklin Community Voting Guide for November 2020 is ready for your use to prepare to vote.

Download your copy here:  https://drive.google.com/file/d/1fIIde4DfyieqnK2hTsZDDfMLmoFcqzoO/view?usp=sharing 

 

 

Franklin Community Voting Guide - November 2020
Franklin Community Voting Guide - November 2020

 

Sunday, October 4, 2020

In the News: "Mail-in ballots are not ripe for fraud"

From the Milford Daily News, an article of interest for Franklin:

"As President Donald Trump continues to claim the ballots are ripe for fraud, some local experts say that’s not the case in Massachusetts

Is anything in life free from potential fraud?

“No” was Steven Kerrigan’s answer.

Kerrigan is Marlborough’s city clerk, a job he’s held since May, after serving seven years as assistant clerk.

When it comes to mail-in ballots in Massachusetts, Kerrigan said, “I feel relatively certain the system is secure.”

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required) 
 
Franklin MA: info can be found on the Town Clerk page
 
 
Franklin, MA: 2020 Election Schedule
Franklin, MA: 2020 Election Schedule

 

Wednesday, September 23, 2020

MA.gov: Information For Voters for 2020

Dd you get the election information booklet in the mail from the Secretary of the Commonwealthhttps://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/eleidx.htm

You can get your copy at the ma.gov page  https://www.sec.state.ma.us/ele/elepdf/IFV_2020.pdf 

or with this Google doc copy:

 

 

MA.gov: Information For Voters for 2020
MA.gov: Information For Voters for 2020

 

Saturday, September 12, 2020

Election recap: Statewide in MA 47 percent of voters voted by mail

From the Boston Globe, an article of interest for Franklin:
"Faced with a historic number of voters, the Sept. 1 Massachusetts primary avoided the weeks-long delays that beset some New York elections. Officials said there is no apparent rash of potential fraud, as officials in Georgia are investigating. “Very positive” is how the state’s top elections officer described the experience.

It was also, in effect, a test run.

With less than eight weeks until the Nov. 3 general election, the scramble to distribute millions of vote-by-mail applications is beginning anew, and local clerks — some of whom struggled with the deluge of primary ballots — are girding for a turnout that could be double, if not more, than the record-setting 1.7 million ballots cast in the primary.

That expected flood is partially the result of the newly expanded option to vote by mail, a route nearly 813,000, or roughly 47 percent of voters, took for the Sept. 1 primary, according to data provided by state officials. And about 1.4 million people have already requested mail-in ballots for the general election, and Secretary of State William F. Galvin’s office expects that number to grow as additional mailings asking if voters want a ballot begin to go out."
Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
Election recap: Statewide in MA 47 percent of voters voted by mail
Election recap: Statewide in MA 47 percent of voters voted by mail

Saturday, September 5, 2020

“I thought I had them all. .... It was human error”

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:  

"The Secretary of the Commonwealth’s office will work closely with Franklin in the weeks leading up to the November presidential election, after about 3,000 ballots went uncounted on election night Tuesday.

“We will certainly be heavily involved in the office leading up to November,” said Debra O’Malley, a spokeswoman with William Galvin’s office.

Franklin was one of three communities, along with Newton and Wellesley, to have uncounted ballots as of Wednesday morning. About 750 ballots that were dropped into Newton’s secure ballot drop boxes in the last three hours of the election went uncounted, while Wellesley was unable to get to about 100 ballots, between late drop box submissions and absentee ballots.

But in Franklin, officials said, the Town Clerk’s Office missed about 3,000 mailed ballots that were processed in advance but not yet tallied, which is allowed by state law. The ballots had been processed (checking which residents voted), then locked into the town clerk’s vault, with the expectation that they would be counted on election day.

“They were in the vault and I forgot them,” Franklin Town Clerk Teresa Burr said. “I thought I had them all. .... It was human error.”

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)

Via Twitter on Friday, and shared to Facebook:
Q - When will the town election results be published?
A = That is a good question. I would guess not until the results are final and official. In case you missed it, the State took over the count process.
Seconded by Town of Franklin:
"Steve is correct. The complete results are being entered by the town staff along with the Secretary of State. They are due by tomorrow but should be done today. We will post immediately when available and when the final results are certified. There will be no preliminary numbers."

“I thought I had them all. .... It was human error”
“I thought I had them all. .... It was human error”