Showing posts with label food insecurity. Show all posts
Showing posts with label food insecurity. Show all posts

Saturday, May 21, 2022

"We urgently need to diversify global food production"

"For the past few years, scientists have been frantically sounding an alarm that governments refuse to hear: the global food system is beginning to look like the global financial system in the run-up to 2008.

While financial collapse would have been devastating to human welfare, food system collapse doesn’t bear thinking about. Yet the evidence that something is going badly wrong has been escalating rapidly. The current surge in food prices looks like the latest sign of systemic instability.

Many people assume that the food crisis was caused by a combination of the pandemic and the invasion of Ukraine. While these are important factors, they aggravate an underlying problem. For years, it looked as if hunger was heading for extinction. The number of undernourished people fell from 811 million in 2005 to 607 million in 2014. But in 2015, the trend began to turn. Hunger has been rising ever since: to 650 million in 2019, and back to 811 million in 2020. This year is likely to be much worse. "

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)


Illustration: Eva Bee/The Guardian
Illustration: Eva Bee/The Guardian

Wednesday, March 2, 2022

Franklin Food Pantry Purchases Building to Expand Programming

Edwin’s Building to be new site of the Franklin Food Pantry 

The Franklin  Food Pantry has purchased a new building to better serve its neighbors. The building, formerly known as Edwin’s, is located at 341 West Central Street and will undergo renovations to convert it into a functional, accessible and expanded Pantry. 

In April of 2020, the Pantry purchased 138 East Central Street to serve as a new location for its operations. After almost 18 months of work, the Pantry concluded that while 138 East Central was a viable option for pre-pandemic operations, Covid-19 so drastically changed operations and programming that the property no longer fully met the Pantry’s neighbors’ needs. The Pantry sold 138 East Central Street in late 2021.  Simultaneously, the Pantry identified Edwin’s as a new relocation opportunity.  After detailed due diligence evaluating the feasibility of the property for its operations, the Franklin Food Pantry Board, on the recommendation of senior staff and the Pantry Building Committee, moved forward with the purchase of 341 West Central Street. The Pantry will use a variety of funding sources to purchase, renovate, and operate the building including grants, state funding, Board restricted funds and private donations specifically restricted for the new building. 

“This new building gives us an opportunity to continue the innovative programs we created during the Pandemic to better serve our neighbors. We are thrilled to honor Jean and Edwin Aldrich by continuing their legacy of connecting with and enriching our community,” said Tina Powderly, Executive Director of the Franklin Food Pantry. “Through the generosity of our Board members and close friends, the hard work of our Building Committee and staff, and community members like Representative Jeff Roy who secured funding in the state budget for our new building, we will more fully meet our vision. The new building will have a larger and more accessible space that we will renovate to best fit our unique programs, especially those  developed over the past two years.”  

These unique programs increase access to healthy food and related services that support needs arising out of food insecurity:  

  • Three simultaneous distribution models (curbside, in-person, and home delivery) to maximize access and options for neighbors in various circumstances  
  • Onsite farmer’s market to provide access to healthy fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs  
  • Three holiday meal kits during the summer, at Thanksgiving, and during year-end holidays that neighbors can customize to their own family traditions  
  • In-person office hours to assist neighbors to access support for their everyday challenges   

341 West Central Street will provide ample and accessible parking, warehouse, shopping and community spaces needed to continue these programs as well as launch additional services to meet the neighbors’ growing and changing needs. The new site will be designed with increased accessibility, confidentiality, safety and comfort and with flexibility to grow additional programs and expand community partnerships.  Together, all of these pieces will better fulfill  the Pantry’s vision of building a community in which everyone in need has an improved quality of life through nutritious food and supportive resources.  

Renovations should begin later this year. In the meantime, The Pantry will continue to operate at its current location and appreciates the continued support of Rockland Trust. 


About the Franklin Food Pantry 

The Franklin Food Pantry offers supplemental food assistance and household necessities to almost 1,100 individuals per year. The Franklin Food Pantry is not funded by the Town  of Franklin. As a private, nonprofit organization, we depend on donations from individuals, corporations, foundations and other strategic partners. 
We are grateful for our many partnerships, including that with the Greater Boston Food Bank, that allow us to  achieve greater buying power and lower our costs. Donations and grants fund our food purchases, keep our lights on, and put gas in our food truck. Other programs include home delivery, Weekend Backpack Program for Franklin school children in need, mobile pantry,  emergency food bags and holiday meal packages. 
The Pantry is located at 43 W. Central St. in Franklin on Route 140 across from the Franklin Fire Station. Visit www.franklinfoodpantry.org for more information. 

 

Edwin’s Building to be new site of the Franklin Food Pantry
Edwin’s Building to be new site of the Franklin Food Pantry 

Wednesday, October 6, 2021

The Topic: 001 - Tina Powderly - Franklin Food Pantry (audio)

Introducing The Topic, a new podcast from the Town of Franklin Health Department. Health Director Cathleen Liberty talks about food insecurity with Franklin Food Pantry Executive Director Tina Powderly.


001 - Tina Powderly - Franklin Food Pantry


Franklin Food Pantry website -> https://www.franklinfoodpantry.org/ 


We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm). 


For additional information, please visit  the Health Dept. page at www.Franklinma.gov   


If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at  cliberty@franklinma.gov 


The music for the intro and exit is called “Positive and Fun” by Scott Holmes Music and is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License  


Scott Holmes Music => https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Holmes


You can also subscribe and listen to TheTopic audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "TheTopic" 


Audio link => https://anchor.fm/franklin21/episodes/001---Tina-Powderly-discusses-food-insecurity-and-Franklin-Food-Pantry-programs-e184f3i/a-a6k8k3p



This will be broadcast on wfpr.fm on Wednesday at 9:00 AM/ 12:00 PM /6:00 PM, repeating again on Saturday at 9:00 AM

The Topic: 001 - Tina Powderly - Franklin Food Pantry (audio)
The Topic: 001 - Tina Powderly - Franklin Food Pantry (audio)


Monday, September 20, 2021

CommonWealth Magazine: "Listen to what food insecure people say they need"

"NEARLY 20 PERCENT of Massachusetts households struggle to access food — a number that has more than doubled during the pandemic. It’s a serious and growing issue, and there’s no shortage of proposed solutions. But to address this problem, we must first properly diagnose it, and there’s one group of people who know better than anyone how to improve food support systems: people who are themselves food insecure. So we asked them. And the results were clear and consistent.

In a survey of over 500 food insecure people across Massachusetts, two common themes emerged: proximity and choice. Across all demographics, those struggling to provide fresh, healthy food for themselves and their families pointed to these same two areas when asked how they could better be served by our food aid systems. By trusting people, bringing food directly to those who need it, and by giving them the freedom and agency to select food they will actually eat, we can build a more effective model for addressing food insecurity."

Continue reading the article online

Direct link to MassInc Survey results
 
Editors Note: This report reinforces the approach the Franklin Food Pantry has taken in addressing our local needs. Yes, there was a change in their plans for the new building but it shows the courage that the Food Pantry had in acknowledging the change in circumstances. Their plans for the 138 West Central building were underway pre-pandemic, and the pandemic affected the delivery model the Food Pantry used, hence the building would not have meet the future needs of the Pantry clients. As a former Board member and regular financial backer of the Food Pantry, I wholeheartedly endorse their approach.

MassInc Survey results
MassInc Survey results


Tuesday, August 24, 2021

"Food insecurity is a silent problem"

"The number of Massachusetts households lacking enough food to get by doubled during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a recent study from Project Bread.

More than half a million residents, more than a quarter of them children, who are eligible for SNAP, or food stamps, don’t receive benefits for the nation’s No. 1 anti-hunger program, according to the research by Project Bread, a Boston nonprofit that works to end hunger in the state.

“The cycle of hunger, it definitely is real,” said Erin McAleer, president and CEO of Project Bread, which surveyed more than 800 Boston residents in partnership with the city’s Office of Food Access and UMass Boston’s Center for Survey Research."
Continue reading the article online (subscription maybe required)
https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/08/22/metro/hungry-mass-households-doubled-during-pandemic/

Direct link to the Project Bread study updated in Aug 2021

"Food insecurity is a silent problem"
"Food insecurity is a silent problem"



A related article from The Washington Post based upon census data
"Hunger around America is improving, compared with a month ago, according to the most recent U.S. census data. But food insecurity has a long way to go before returning to pre-pandemic levels.

Self-reported food insecurity for the week ending Aug. 2 was at its lowest levels since the start of the coronavirus pandemic for households with children, according to the census data. That dovetails with strong jobs numbers, stronger economic growth and other bright spots in the economic recovery.

But food stamps enrollment is still way up, 2 million more than last year and 6 million more than in 2019. And food banks are still seeing dramatically more need than during pre-pandemic times." 
Continue reading the article online (subscription maybe required)

Saturday, August 21, 2021

Washington Post: "Booming business at dollar stores"

"A growing number of Americans are relying on dollar stores for everyday needs, especially groceries, as the coronavirus pandemic drags into its 18th month. Chains such as Dollar General and Dollar Tree are reporting blockbuster sales and profits, and proliferating so quickly that some U.S. cities want to limit their growth. The 1,650 dollar stores expected to open this year represent nearly half of all new national retail openings, according to Coresight Research.

Foot traffic at the largest such chain, Dollar General, is up 32 percent from pre-pandemic levels, far outpacing the 3 percent increase at Walmart, one of the few retail winners of last year, according to Placer.ai, which analyzes shopping patterns using location data from 30 million devices."
Continue reading the article online (subscription maybe required)
https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2021/08/20/growing-number-americans-are-relying-dollar-stores/

A shopper pushes a cart through Family Dollar in Chicago. (Daniel Acker/Bloomberg News)
A shopper pushes a cart through Family Dollar in Chicago. (Daniel Acker/Bloomberg News)


Monday, August 9, 2021

Spier Family Kindness For Kids 5K & Kids Run + Family Day - Sep 19

Join us for a great race and family day at the site of so many championships!

Sponsored by the Spier Family and in support of Hockomock Area YMCA Food Access Programs, the annual 5K that hundreds have come to love (formerly called The Foxboro 5K) returns to Patriot Place and will be held Sunday, Sept. 19. Join us!

Food insecurity is a growing concern in the region and, to address this, the Hockomock Y provides free food and meals with no questions asked. We are proud to announce that the annual Hockomock Area YMCA 5K has matured beyond our former route neighboring the Foxboro Y and invite you to run/walk at Patriot Place surrounding Gillette Stadium!

This course and the entire morning of activities will make memories for years to come for all ages and abilities. All proceeds will go to feeding our community. 

More info and link to register at https://www.hockymca.org/5k-family-day/

Spier Family Kindness For Kids 5K & Kids Run + Family Day - Sep 19


Spier Family Kindness For Kids 5K & Kids Run + Family Day - Sep 19

 

Saturday, August 7, 2021

Franklin Food Pantry: Time for a nibble!


Franklin Food Pantry
Time for a nibble!
Hello,

Happy Summer Days!
As a much-appreciated donor, we want you to see how contribution has supported some particular programs for our neighbors in the recent months.

JULY 4th DISTRIBUTION
This first ever distribution was a huge hit with our neighbors, their families and our staff. We distributed over 175 bags of items for a summer feast, including hot dogs, hamburgers, rolls, chips, condiments and cotton candy. Fun Bags of chalk, bubbles, footballs, American flags and more brought smiles to many faces. It was a brutally hot day but so worth it. Given the immense success, we hope to secure funding to permanently add July 4th Bags to our Holiday Distributions for Thanksgiving and Winter.
JULY 4th DISTRIBUTION
JULY 4th DISTRIBUTION 1
FARMER'S MARKET at THE PANTRY
We have incredible volunteers led by Jen Kuse who care for our 11 beds at the Community Garden on King Street. We also are lucky enough to receive fresh produce from local churches who grow fresh produce on their own premises. Your funding supports the costs for this vital program, including purchasing seeds, plants and equipment; renting and maintaining the beds; packaging the produce, and more. Below you will catch a glimpse of the amazing fresh herbs and vegetables - and wild flowers - that are grown, harvested and distributed to neighbors each week!
.
FARMER'S MARKET at THE PANTRY
FARMER'S MARKET at THE PANTRY 1
Thank you for your continued support of the Franklin Food Pantry! We hope you enjoy the rest of your summer and we will see you in the fall as we kick off two our largest fundraising events of the year: the annual Turkey Trot and our popular food elves program!

Franklin Food Pantry | 43 WEST CENTRAL STREET, Franklin, MA 02038

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Monday, July 19, 2021

Invisible Stories - #6 -"Los Angeles Homeless Man Produces Podcast with his Cellphone"

"I never woke up and said ... I want to live out here on the streets"

Mark Horvath (@hardlynormal) tweeted on Sun, Jul 11, 2021:
Invisible Stories is a mini-doc series that goes beyond the rhetoric, statistics, political debates, and limitations of social services to examine poverty in America via a medium that audiences of all ages understand and can't ignore. 

Link to the 6th of the series: https://youtu.be/VixkQ6iu9_c

Theo Henderson's podcast =>   https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cDovL3dldGhldW5ob3VzZWQubGlic3luLmNvbS9yc3M?ved=0CAUQrrcFahcKEwightjc96LqAhUAAAAAHQAAAAAQIg

Link to the series: https://t.co/Y0NRNIujar 

Shared from Twitter:
 https://twitter.com/hardlynormal/status/1414284287034155020

Note: I met Mark at a social media conference many years ago and have been following his work. This series is very well done. Yes, the series is set in LA but homelessness is an issue all around us whether visible or not.

 

Tuesday, July 13, 2021

Invisible Stories - #2 - "House Calls to Homeless People in Venice Beach"

"the intervention that counts is housing"

Mark Horvath (@hardlynormal) tweeted on Sun, Jul 11, 2021:

Invisible Stories is a mini-doc series that goes beyond the rhetoric, statistics, political debates, and limitations of social services to examine poverty in America via a medium that audiences of all ages understand and can't ignore. 

Link to the second of the series: https://youtu.be/8N2Ry_g15KA

Link to the series: https://t.co/Y0NRNIujar 

Shared from Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardlynormal/status/1414284287034155020

Note: I met Mark at a social media conference many years ago and have been following his work. This series is very well done. Yes, the series is set in LA but homelessness is an issue all around us whether visible or not.




Monday, July 12, 2021

Invisible Stories - #1 - "We Can't Let Homeless People Die: USC Street Medicine on Skid Row"

Mark Horvath (@hardlynormal) tweeted on Sun, Jul 11, 2021:
Invisible Stories is a mini-doc series that goes beyond the rhetoric, statistics, political debates, and limitations of social services to examine poverty in America via a medium that audiences of all ages understand and can't ignore. 

Link to the first of the series: https://youtu.be/RWVt_arzYoA

Link to the series: https://t.co/Y0NRNIujar 

Shared from Twitter:
 https://twitter.com/hardlynormal/status/1414284287034155020

Note: I met Mark at a social media conference many years ago and have been following his work. This series is very well done. Yes, the series is set in LA but homelessness is an issue all around us whether visible or not.

Invisible Stories - #1 - "We Can't Let Homeless People Die: USC Street Medicine on Skid Row"
Invisible Stories - #1 - "We Can't Let Homeless People Die: USC Street Medicine on Skid Row"

Friday, July 2, 2021

Franklin Food Pantry: Introducing our Annual Report


Introducing our Annual Report
Introducing our Annual Report


This snapshot of Franklin Food Pantry's revenues, expenses, programs, donors and neighbors provides an update on our operations and the impact of your support. We faced many challenges this past year and are pleased that The Food Pantry emerged from The Pandemic stronger than ever and continues our mission to serve our neighbors. If you have any questions about The Pantry, please do not hesitate to visit our website or reach out to me directly.

With deepest appreciation,

Tina Powderly
Executive Director Franklin Food Pantry
Franklin Food Pantry | Website

Franklin Food Pantry | 43 WEST CENTRAL STREET, Franklin, MA 02038

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Thursday, June 24, 2021

Project envoy continues its work - "Survey finds significant food insecurity among Massachusetts families"

Project Envoy will be at the community table for the next 5 weeks sharing information about food insecurity and bringing awareness to the Franklin Food Pantry.  
Be sure to stop by and visit them.

Coincidentally, the Boston Globe has an article on a recent study by MassINC:
"Nearly half of Massachusetts parents in a recent survey said their families experienced food insecurity during the coronavirus pandemic, but many who were eligible for federal assistance didn’t seek it because they weren’t fully informed about the program, according to The MassINC Polling Group.

About 47 percent of those surveyed reported experiencing food insecurity over the past year, but only about 40 percent of that group received benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, commonly known as food stamps, according to a statement from MassINC.

Fewer than half of those making $25,000 a year or less, an income that would most likely allow them to qualify for SNAP, actually received benefits, according to the survey."

Produce at the South Street Congregational Church food pantry in Pittsfield, Mass.BEN GARVER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Produce at the South Street Congregational Church food pantry in Pittsfield, Mass.BEN GARVER/ASSOCIATED PRESS