Showing posts with label equity. Show all posts
Showing posts with label equity. Show all posts

Sunday, May 1, 2022

Meet-Greet with finalist for DEI Director - May 3, 2022

Franklin Public Schools has been actively conducting a search for our Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. A committee consisting of teachers, parents, district administrators and School Committee was established to conduct initial interviews. After much thoughtful discussion, the committee came to consensus that there was one candidate who rose to the top as an exceptional leader and who they recommended to move forward in the process. The group announced earlier this month that Heidi Harris is the finalist for the position. 

We encourage parents and guardians to come meet Ms. Harris on Tuesday, May 3rd from 6:30 PM - 7:30 PM in the 2nd floor Council Chambers of the Municipal Building (355 East Central Street, Franklin, MA). 

Ms. Harris will be available to discuss her background and answer questions. 

Meet-Greet with finalist for DEI Director - May 3, 2022
Meet-Greet with finalist for DEI Director - May 3, 2022

Friday, February 25, 2022

Urgency of Equity: a toolkit to help communities sort out fact from fiction


There is a moral urgency to protect all students & staff, including those who are most vulnerable.

We put together a toolkit to help communities sort out fact from fiction & advocate for a safe, healthy learning environment for everyone: https://t.co/YBDVlqUgKm #UrgencyOfEquity
Shared from -> https://t.co/ue8XtL20YM

Monday, February 21, 2022

"we can celebrate both our differences and our similarities"

The analogy of "windows, mirrors, and sliding glass doors" struck me when I heard it at the School Committee meeting Feb 8 and then again at the Town Council meeting Feb 16. I was delighted to find my eyes caught a reference to this in my Twitter stream. 

Via Debbie Reese (https://twitter.com/debreese), we find that Reading is Fundamental (https://www.rif.org/) shared a re-print of the original article by Rudine Sims Bishop published in 1990.  

"Books are sometimes windows, offering views of worlds that may be real or imagined, familiar or strange. These windows are also sliding glass doors, and readers have only to walk through in imagination to become part of whatever world has been created or recreated by the author. When lighting conditions are just right, however, a window can also be a mirror. Literature transforms human experience and reflects it back to us, and in that reflection we can see our own lives and experiences as part of the larger human experience. Reading, then, becomes a means of self-affirmation, and readers often seek their mirrors in books."

You can read the full article here -> https://scenicregional.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Mirrors-Windows-and-Sliding-Glass-Doors.pdf

The Twitter thread ->  https://twitter.com/debreese/status/1495060049634467840

School Committee DEI presentation ->   https://www.franklinps.net/sites/g/files/vyhlif4431/f/uploads/dei_presentation_february_8_2022_5.pdf

Audio recording of the DEI segment -> https://franklin-ma-matters.captivate.fm/episode/fm-727-school-committee-meeting-02-08-22-p2-of-3 


slide from the update on diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts around the district
slide from the update on diversity, equity, and inclusion efforts around the district

Town Council Meeting - 02/16/22 - Audio in 3 parts

FM #735-736-737 = This is the Franklin Matters radio show, numbers 735-736-737 in the series. 

This session shares part of the Franklin, MA Town Council meeting held on Wednesday, February 16, 2022. 

The meeting was conducted in a hybrid format: members of the Town Council and Town Administration personnel, the Police new hires, along with their guest and family members were in the Council Chambers, some members of the public participated in person, some via the Zoom conference bridge, all to adhere to the ‘social distancing’ requirements of this pandemic period.

I’ve split the three hour and 10 minute meeting into three (3) logical segments:

The show notes contain links to the meeting agenda. Let’s listen to this segment of the Town Council meeting of Feb 16, 2022

Part 1 -

Part 2 -

Part 3 -

--------------
Presentation Diversity, Equity & Inclusion - Sara Ahern, Superintendent of Schools -> https://www.franklinps.net/sites/g/files/vyhlif4431/f/uploads/dei_presentation_february_8_2022_5.pdf

--------------

We are now producing this in collaboration with Franklin.TV and Franklin Public Radio (wfpr.fm) or 102.9 on the Franklin area radio dial

This podcast is my public service effort for Franklin but we can't do it alone. We can always use your help.

How can you help?
  • If you can use the information that you find here, please tell your friends and neighbors
  • If you don't like something here, please let me know
Through this feedback loop we can continue to make improvements. I thank you for listening.

For additional information, please visit www.Franklinmatters.org   or www.franklin.news 

If you have questions or comments you can reach me directly at shersteve @ gmail dot com

The music for the intro and exit was provided by Michael Clark and the group "East of Shirley". The piece is titled "Ernesto, manana"  c. Michael Clark & Tintype Tunes, 2008 and used with their permission.

I hope you enjoy!

------------------

You can also subscribe and listen to Franklin Matters audio on iTunes or your favorite podcast app; search in "podcasts" for "Franklin Matters"

Town Council Meeting - 02/16/22 - Audio in 3 parts
Town Council Meeting - 02/16/22 - Audio in 3 parts

Sunday, February 13, 2022

Franklin, MA: Town Council - Agenda - Feb 16, 2022 - 7 PM

FRANKLIN TOWN COUNCIL
Agenda & Meeting Packet
February 16, 2022 - 7 PM

1. ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE CHAIR
a. This meeting is being recorded by Franklin TV and shown on Comcast channel 11 and Verizon Channel 29. This meeting may be recorded by others.
b. Chair to identify members participating remotely.
 
2. CITIZEN COMMENTS
a. Citizens are welcome to express their views for up to three minutes on a matter that is not on the agenda. The Council will not engage in a dialogue or comment on a matter raised during Citizen Comments. The Town Council will give remarks appropriate consideration and may ask the Town Administrator to review the matter.

3. APPROVAL OF MINUTES - None Scheduled.
4. PROCLAMATIONS/RECOGNITIONS - None Scheduled.

5. APPOINTMENTS
a. New Hire: Police Department - Derek Mackey
b. New Hire: Police Department - Tyler Brabham
c. New Hire: Police Department - Joseph Burchill
d. New Hire: Police Department - Michael Demers
e. New Hire: Police Department - Conor Desmond

6. HEARINGS - 7:10pm - None Scheduled.
7. LICENSE TRANSACTIONS - None Scheduled.

8. PRESENTATIONS/DISCUSSIONS
a. Discussion: West Street Neighborhood Parking - Thomas J. Lynch, Chief of Police
b. Presentation: Diversity, Equity & Inclusion - Sara Ahern, Superintendent of Schools
9. SUBCOMMITTEE REPORTS
a. Capital Budget Subcommittee
b. Budget Subcommittee
c. Economic Development Subcommittee
d. Town Administrator Evaluation Ad Hoc Subcommittee Report

10. LEGISLATION FOR ACTION
a. Resolution 22-13: Adoption of Fiscal Policies (Motion to Approve Resolution 22-13 - Majority Vote)
b. Resolution 22-14: Cable Funds in Support of PEG Service and Programming per MGL Ch. 44, §53F3/4 (Motion to Approve Resolution 22-14 - Majority Vote)
 
11. TOWN ADMINISTRATOR’S REPORT
12. FUTURE AGENDA ITEM
13. COUNCIL COMMENTS
14. EXECUTIVE SESSION
15. ADJOURN

Note:
Two-Thirds Vote: requires 6 votes
Majority Vote: requires majority of members present and voting

Agenda doc and remote connection info ->

slide from the presentation on Diversity, Equity & Inclusion
slide from the presentation on Diversity, Equity & Inclusion


Thursday, February 10, 2022

School Committee hears of the diversity, equity and inclusion work underway

Quick recap:
  • School Committee hears multiple citizen comments on their masking options and about their endorsement of Senator Becca Rausch's re-election campaign; some positive encouragement comments also came from the audience (many of these remained for the full meeting while most of the negative commentors left)
  • The key portion of the meeting was the update on the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) work the district has had underway. "We don't pretend to have all the answers we are working together with humility to strive to be open"

Neither the Superintendent's Report, nor the DEI presentation were available on the FPS page as this was prepared for publication Wednesday evening. When they are, the links will be shared.

Audio recording should be available in a couple of days

Photos taken during the meeting and shared via Twitter can be found in one album -> https://photos.app.goo.gl/1Vgd7ttTG3fTfQc28

Thread Reader produces a PDF of my notes shared via Twitter including the photos inline with the thread. You can read the thread here or in the embedded doc below https://drive.google.com/file/d/1P-X_5wIMwOddS_k3_dVNWB57dzoxxeM9/view?usp=sharing


 

School Committee hears of the diversity, equity and inclusion work underway
School Committee hears of the diversity, equity and inclusion work underway


Saturday, November 13, 2021

MIAA Statement on sportsmanship

Dear MIAA/MSAA Members:

Today marks my 35th day as Executive Director of MIAA and MSAA. I am tremendously honored to lead these great organizations and energized by the work ahead.

Over the past four weeks, I have traveled around the Commonwealth, meeting with Superintendents, Principals, Athletic Directors, Coaches, and other members of our organizations. I’ve held meetings in seven of the nine MIAA districts and look forward to visiting the remaining two very soon. In the coming weeks, I will reach out to the membership again to share some initial thoughts about my priorities for the MIAA and the MSAA, as well as my own core beliefs and values. 

However, there is a pressing matter making headlines and causing concern among many of our members that I want to address.

An altercation between two teams at a recent high school football game has brought to the forefront critical issues related to diversity, equity, and inclusion in interscholastic athletics. Here at the MIAA, we are deeply troubled by allegations that players, coaches, or fans harassed members of the opposing team with racial slurs or other hateful language.

Sportsmanship is one of the MIAA’s five central pillars, and we take very seriously our responsibility to help instill in student athletes a commitment to behaving with the utmost respect and dignity. One of the greatest benefits of interscholastic sports is the opportunity to meet and interact with students from other communities and backgrounds. It is essential that students and adults approach those interactions with respect and civility.

We are encouraged that the two schools involved in this matter have agreed to conduct a joint investigation, in order to examine the facts about what occurred during the game. I commend the school and district leaders for their willingness to work together in pursuit of the truth, and just as importantly, to address the issues that caused the altercation in the first place. We at the MIAA are prepared to support both teams and communities in any ways that would be helpful, particularly to make this a valuable learning experience for everyone involved.

This incident is not the first of its kind, and sadly, will not be the last. Therefore, this is an important opportunity to ask what role, if any, MIAA should play when these complex issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion arise within or between our athletic communities. Over the past two years in particular, our country has begun a profound reckoning on race and racism. Many of our schools and districts are grappling with these topics and striving to be more diverse, equitable, and inclusive. The MIAA and the MSAA are committed to engaging deeply in this work, too – so that we can make a difference in eradicating racism and all other forms of bias.

In the wake of the most recent case, some have urged the MIAA to get more involved in the resolution of these types of disputes. It has been suggested that MIAA could serve as an arbitrator, hold hearings, gather evidence, mandate reports, issue findings, and if necessary, impose sanctions on any guilty parties. My initial instinct is that the MIAA has a long history of emphasizing its regulatory responsibilities, which are important in some – but not all – contexts. I recognize and value the need for the MIAA to serve as a regulatory body in athletic matters, in which we have broad experience and expertise. I am not convinced, however, that the MIAA should play judge or jury as investigators or arbitrators into allegations of racism, sexism, homophobia, or other forms of bias. Our role should be to determine how the MIAA can support and guide our member schools in order to ensure that these issues are addressed with fidelity. As a former Superintendent, Principal, and Coach myself, I am highly reluctant to burden schools and districts with yet another layer of bureaucracy and compliance, especially when they are struggling through such difficult circumstances in their communities.

As the Board and staff of the MIAA consider the path forward, I believe we have a significant opportunity to begin placing greater emphasis on some of our other core responsibilities – particularly educational athletics, which includes sportsmanship and diversity, equity, and inclusion – rather than always leading with our regulatory authority. In these sensitive matters, it is my hope that the MIAA can focus more on being in service of our member schools and districts, instead of expanding our role as rule makers and enforcers.

As I embark on this role, I consider our work in diversity, equity, and inclusion to be one of the highest priorities. In the short term, we will explore a range of resources and supports that the MIAA can provide to member schools and districts to help them become better equipped to prevent incidents of bias, harassment, and discrimination – and to respond effectively to incidents when they do arise. I am particularly committed to expanding the training that we offer players, coaches, officials, and others with regard to diversity, equity, and inclusion. First and foremost, we must do our part to ensure that no one engaged in interscholastic athletics feels disrespected, unsafe, or unwelcome -- on or off the playing fields.

I look forward to working with you on these and other important issues moving forward. Sincerely,

Dr. Robert Baldwin
Executive Director, MIAA & MSAA

Statement PDF -> https://t.co/uh3xEttH2g

Shared from Twitter:  https://twitter.com/MIAA033/status/1459225742068400137

Wednesday, July 28, 2021

"stressed the importance of focusing on equity and addressing racial and socioeconomic disparities"

"NEARLY 70 PERCENT of White households in Massachusetts own a home. Only 37.4 percent of non-White households own a home. That gives Massachusetts the seventh highest racial homeownership gap in the country.  
Secretary of Housing and Economic Development Mike Kinnealy told legislators at a public hearing Tuesday that for Black families trying to buy their own home, “the cards are stacked against them.”  
As lawmakers are determining how to spend $5.3 billion in federal money that the state will get from the American Rescue Plan Act, Baker administration officials are pushing their plan to spend $1 billion on housing programs as a way to help close that racial gap. "

Condos under construction in 2018 on Washington Street in Dorchester. (Photo by Michael Jonas)
Condos under construction in 2018 on Washington Street in Dorchester. (Photo by Michael Jonas)

Current draft of the Housing Production Plan


The most recent virtual meeting on Housing took place July 14, 2021 and the audio recording is available here  https://www.franklinmatters.org/2021/07/fm-580-community-conversation-on.html


Tuesday, July 20, 2021

Invisible Stories - #7 - "Suitcase Joe Captures the Humanity of Skid Row"

"It needs to be done, and it needs to be done right"

Mark Horvath (@hardlynormal) tweeted on Sun, Jul 11, 2021:
Invisible Stories is a mini-doc series that goes beyond the rhetoric, statistics, political debates, and limitations of social services to examine poverty in America via a medium that audiences of all ages understand and can't ignore. 

Link to the 7th of the series: https://youtu.be/7YG8KMFGA4c

More photos of the life on Skid Row by Suitcase Joe   https://suitcasejoephotography.tumblr.com/

Link to the series: https://t.co/Y0NRNIujar 

Shared from Twitter:
   https://twitter.com/hardlynormal/status/1414284287034155020

Note: I met Mark at a social media conference many years ago and have been following his work. This series is very well done. Yes, the series is set in LA but homelessness is an issue all around us whether visible or not.

 

Monday, July 19, 2021

Invisible Stories - #6 -"Los Angeles Homeless Man Produces Podcast with his Cellphone"

"I never woke up and said ... I want to live out here on the streets"

Mark Horvath (@hardlynormal) tweeted on Sun, Jul 11, 2021:
Invisible Stories is a mini-doc series that goes beyond the rhetoric, statistics, political debates, and limitations of social services to examine poverty in America via a medium that audiences of all ages understand and can't ignore. 

Link to the 6th of the series: https://youtu.be/VixkQ6iu9_c

Theo Henderson's podcast =>   https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cDovL3dldGhldW5ob3VzZWQubGlic3luLmNvbS9yc3M?ved=0CAUQrrcFahcKEwightjc96LqAhUAAAAAHQAAAAAQIg

Link to the series: https://t.co/Y0NRNIujar 

Shared from Twitter:
 https://twitter.com/hardlynormal/status/1414284287034155020

Note: I met Mark at a social media conference many years ago and have been following his work. This series is very well done. Yes, the series is set in LA but homelessness is an issue all around us whether visible or not.

 

Friday, July 16, 2021

Invisible Stories - #5 - "Helping Homeless People During Coronavirus in Los Angeles"

"there are so many ways to help our unhoused community"

Mark Horvath (@hardlynormal) tweeted on Sun, Jul 11, 2021:
Invisible Stories is a mini-doc series that goes beyond the rhetoric, statistics, political debates, and limitations of social services to examine poverty in America via a medium that audiences of all ages understand and can't ignore. 

Link to the 5th of the series: https://youtu.be/8pWTs9hxKls

Link to the series: https://t.co/Y0NRNIujar 

Shared from Twitter:   
 https://twitter.com/hardlynormal/status/1414284287034155020

Note: I met Mark at a social media conference many years ago and have been following his work. This series is very well done. Yes, the series is set in LA but homelessness is an issue all around us whether visible or not. 


Thursday, July 15, 2021

Franklin Launches Freedom Team To Promote “Unity In The Community”

Franklin Becomes The Fifth Massachusetts Community To Form A Local Freedom Team

In the wake of 2020’s racial unrest, a broad coalition of Franklin community leaders came together to form a Freedom Team with the mission of ‘preserving freedom through unity in the community.’ The team’s members meet monthly to explore ways of offering dialogue and support to individuals and the entire community with a goal of promoting love, inclusion, and trust (“LIT”).
Franklin Freedom Team

“We, as a Town, are a community through unity,” explains Jamele Adams, Franklin resident and founder of the Freedom Team network. “And if anything happens in the community that is rooted in bias, instead of trying to figure out who to call and how to respond, we want a team to already be in place. We want a team that is proactive, reactive, and retroactive.”

Franklin Freedom Team membership follows the network’s Community 10-Point Connection Model which includes diverse community representatives, including parents, students, educators, town and school local officials, clergy, a lawyer, a trauma-informed clinician, a transformative justice facilitator, and a social media expert. In addition to their regular meetings, the Team hosts a hotline and email for residents to contact if they have experienced or witnessed bias-motivated threats, harassment, or violence. The Team promises to “offer a private and respectful space to discuss the incident using a transformative justice model not only to try to repair the harm through inclusion, trust, and equity, but also to educate and strengthen the community.”

To date, the group has met virtually every month throughout 2021 and their members have helped organize community conversations on police reform, inclusion in early education, and youth AAPI experiences. The group was in immediate dialogue following last month’s news of a swastika found in Franklin High School.

Mr. Adams, the group’s founder, is no stranger to promoting ‘LIT-ness’ in majority-White communities. Longtime Dean of Students at Brandeis University and current Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion for Scituate Public Schools, Adams first helped found a Freedom Team while living in Natick back in 2016. The success of the initial team – captured in a 2017
 
TEDx talk by Adams (https://youtu.be/pCkyrxruNaQ– has since inspired Hopkinton, Waltham, Wellesley, and now Franklin to form similar coalitions in their communities. (More teams are in development.)

The current membership of Franklin’s Freedom Team includes:
jamele adams, founder and transformative justice facilitator
Sara Ahern, Superintendent of Franklin Public Schools
Rabbi Tom Alpert, Temple Etz Chaim
Camille Napier Bernstein, community advocate
Justin Bates, co-founder of Franklin Area Against Racism
Cobi Frongillo, Town Councilor
Jamie Hellen, Franklin Town Administrator
Elise Howell, clinician
Chief TJ Lynch, Franklin Police Department
Rev. Kathy McAdams, Rector of St John's Episcopal Church and President of the Franklin Interfaith Council
Angelina Perez, student
Judith Perez, parent
Angela Snyder, lawyer
Meghan Whitmore, community advocate

You can learn more about the Franklin Freedom Team at franklinfreedomteam.org.

To report hate, bias-motivated threats, harassment, and violence, residents of Franklin are urged to call the hotline (508-507-9693) or email franklinfreedomteam@gmail.com.

Residents who fear for their immediate safety or have an emergency should call 911 immediately. 


Invisible Stories - #4 - "Ktown for All Helping Homeless People in Los Angeles’s Koreatown"

Mark Horvath (@hardlynormal) tweeted on Sun, Jul 11, 2021:
Invisible Stories is a mini-doc series that goes beyond the rhetoric, statistics, political debates, and limitations of social services to examine poverty in America via a medium that audiences of all ages understand and can't ignore. 

Link to the 4th of the series: https://youtu.be/_Gvp3NUBB_A

Link to the series: https://t.co/Y0NRNIujar 

Shared from Twitter:
 https://twitter.com/hardlynormal/status/1414284287034155020

Note: I met Mark at a social media conference many years ago and have been following his work. This series is very well done. Yes, the series is set in LA but homelessness is an issue all around us whether visible or not. 


Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Invisible Stories - #3 - "Echo Park Lake's Homeless Community: 'Where Are We Going to Go'"

Mark Horvath (@hardlynormal) tweeted on Sun, Jul 11, 2021:
Invisible Stories is a mini-doc series that goes beyond the rhetoric, statistics, political debates, and limitations of social services to examine poverty in America via a medium that audiences of all ages understand and can't ignore. 

Link to the 3rd of the series: https://youtu.be/iY3LwDH72-c

Link to the series: https://t.co/Y0NRNIujar 

Shared from Twitter:   
 https://twitter.com/hardlynormal/status/1414284287034155020

Note: I met Mark at a social media conference many years ago and have been following his work. This series is very well done. Yes, the series is set in LA but homelessness is an issue all around us whether visible or not. 


Baker-Polito Administration Releases Future of Work Report

Charlie Baker (@MassGovernor) tweeted  on Tue, Jul 13, 2021:
To address key findings, our plan proposes support for several critical areas, including:

🏘️ Housing
🛠️ Workforce Training
🏙️ Downtown Development
🏥 Substance Use & Behavioral Health Programming
🚸 Child Care
🚗 Transportation Flexibility & Improvements

Full press release link ->  https://www.mass.gov/news/baker-polito-administration-releases-future-of-work-report-outlines-ongoing-steps-to-address-findings

The report provides eight core insights:
  1. Demand for office real estate may fall as workers spend more time in residential areas due to hybrid work.
  2. Hybrid work will likely drive demand for flexible childcare options, requiring childcare business models to evolve.
  3. Public transit ridership is likely to fall, with the steepest decline likely in commuter rail.
  4. Business travel may be structurally reduced from pre-pandemic levels.
  5. Workforce training may be required at an unprecedented scale and pace.
  6. The Commonwealth population is likely to grow, albeit more slowly than pre-pandemic
  7. Existing equity challenges will intensify.
  8. Equitable housing opportunities will be key to retaining and attracting people.
Download the full report here to read:

Shared from Twitter:  https://t.co/wM28MYuav7

Commonwealth Magazine coverage:

Boston Globe coverage


Future of Work Report
Future of Work Report


Tuesday, July 13, 2021

Reminder: Community Conversations - Housing and Race - July 14 - 7 PM (via Zoom)

Housing and Race - July 14 - 7 PM
Housing and Race - July 14 - 7 PM
The Franklin Area Against Racism group (FAAR) is holding the second segment of its Community Conversations series, this time on Housing and Race next Wednesday, July 14th at 7:00PM. 

We invited Jim Johnston (longtime Franklin resident and historian), Bryan Taberner (Franklin Director of Planning and Community Development), and Jesse Kanson-Benanav (Executive Director of Abundant Housing MA) to discuss how how Franklin's housing policies and practices have fostered socio-economic inequities and worked to reduce diversity in the community.

Zoom info contained in the image



Background on Jesse Kanson-Benanav

Invisible Stories - #2 - "House Calls to Homeless People in Venice Beach"

"the intervention that counts is housing"

Mark Horvath (@hardlynormal) tweeted on Sun, Jul 11, 2021:

Invisible Stories is a mini-doc series that goes beyond the rhetoric, statistics, political debates, and limitations of social services to examine poverty in America via a medium that audiences of all ages understand and can't ignore. 

Link to the second of the series: https://youtu.be/8N2Ry_g15KA

Link to the series: https://t.co/Y0NRNIujar 

Shared from Twitter: https://twitter.com/hardlynormal/status/1414284287034155020

Note: I met Mark at a social media conference many years ago and have been following his work. This series is very well done. Yes, the series is set in LA but homelessness is an issue all around us whether visible or not.




Monday, July 12, 2021

MA News: the digital divide; help for MA arts organizations

"Tracking the digital divide - We can't close it without first documenting it "
"OVER THE PAST YEAR, schools, workplaces, health care providers, and other basic services have moved online. In doing so, the centrality of the internet to modern life became crystal clear to everyone in the country. But for people and families without broadband access, the pandemic has only exposed and exacerbated the digital divide—putting resources like telework, virtual learning, and telehealth out of reach for millions of people. 
Even before the pandemic, many people lacked access to high-speed broadband across Massachusetts. According to the ACLU of Massachusetts Data for Justice project, Census estimates show that more than 1 million Massachusetts residents—about 15 percent of the state’s population—do not have a fixed broadband internet connection. Our Census analysis also shows that internet and computer access correlate with income, such that lower income communities are disproportionately left unconnected."
Continue reading the article online

 
"Long-awaited arts funding finally arriving"
"MASSACHUSETTS ARTS appear to be big beneficiaries of $16 billion in federal relief aid that is finally starting to be released after a delayed start and an arduous review process.

According to federal data on the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant program, 123 Massachusetts arts organizations have received more than $100 million so far, the seventh-highest amount of any state in the country."
Continue reading the article online


Thursday, April 1, 2021

Pantherbook: Girl Up club leads “A Discussion on Gender Equality" ; FHS switches to 'in person' learning Apr 12

"On Thursday, March 25, students met through the Girl Up club for “A Discussion on Gender Equality.” The meeting was led by Girl Up Teen Advisor Angelina Perez.

The meeting drew local participants as well as Girl Up members from LA, the British Virgin Islands, Syracuse, and Washington D.C.

The discussion started with the simple question, “How have you been impacted by sexism or misogyny?”
 
High Schoolers from Franklin and around the country met over Zoom to discuss gender equality. Photo used with permission from Angelina Perez

Quickly, the floodgates opened and girls shared deeply personal stories."

Continue reading the article online
April 12th is the finalized date for when Franklin High will be having nearly eighty percent of their students back in school. The CDC recently approved that it is safe for students to now be three feet apart in classrooms.

When talking to Mr. Hanna he explains how there are many different safety measures put in at FHS for not only the students, but the staff as well. There will be a maximum of twenty four desks per classroom all measured to be at least 3 feet apart, there will also always be six feet between a teacher and a student.
Continue reading the article online
 
 
FHS switches to 'in person' learning Apr 12
FHS switches to 'in person' learning Apr 12


Monday, March 15, 2021

What gets funded is a question of priorities, but who sets them? “Let’s face it, we don’t have ribbon cuttings when we replace a pipe"

A good interactive article at Washington Post on how we miss the boat in funding the basics.
"In the shadow of its exceptionalism, America fails to invest in the basics. 
Stunning advances in medicine and technology have come
alongside systemic breakdowns in infrastructure and health.

.... 

America can put a rover on Mars, but it can’t keep the lights on and water running in the city that birthed the modern space program. It can develop vaccines, in record time, to combat a world-altering illness, but suffers one of the developed world’s highest death rates due to lack of prevention and care. It spins out endless entertainment to keep millions preoccupied during lockdown — and keep tech shares riding high on Wall Street — but leaves kids disconnected from the access they need to do their schoolwork. "

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)