Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Kristi Kirshe is up for the HSBC World Rugby Women's Sevens Series Rookie of the Year 2019

Via @FranklinRec



"a real organic change toward making sure that our language is reflecting our human experiences"

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"For a few Massachusetts communities, equality has nothing to do with why there is no gender in top board titles. In Franklin, the name “Town Council” was chosen in 1978 for the type of government that came with the term. 
“It was entirely about the type of government,” said Franklin author James Johnston Jr., whose Franklin history “Odyssey in the Wilderness” won a national award. “I don’t think that anybody thought about (gender).” 
While select boards, city councils and town councils have ruled a few communities, like Franklin, for decades, recent years have seen a purposeful switch in language to be more inclusive. At least 10 towns since 2017 have voted to have select boards, and Somerville’s top elected officials became city councilors last year."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190610/more-municipal-boards-switching-to-gender-neutral-designations


“We make it a celebration of what they’ve accomplished”

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:
"Kids in Franklin have shown that you don’t have to be big to accomplish great things. 
For the past 12 years, youths ages 3 to 14 have put their feet to work kicking cancer, pedaling their bikes each June in the Franklin PMC Kids Ride and putting their town in the third spot statewide for fundraising power. 
“We’ve been up there for the last several years,” says Sharon Baryluk, a Franklin mom who has been on the Franklin PMC Ride planning committee since the beginning. 
Her kids have aged out of the event, but she and her fellow organizers feel compelled to continue their mission: To encourage children to ride their bikes and give back to the community, “instilling the value of working for the benefit of others and promote athletic fitness and physical activity,” all while helping the Dana Farber Institute through its Jimmy Fund with the funding it needs for life-saving cancer research and treatment."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190610/franklin-pmc-kids-ride-one-of-states-tops-fundraisers

Riders and volunteers can register and donate online at www.kids.pmc.org/franklin

Franklin PMC Kids Ride
Franklin PMC Kids Ride

MBTA Commuter Rail: Through June 25: Franklin Line Alert

Weekdays, June 13-25, due to Amtrak switch replacement near Readville, outbound trains 741 & 703 as well as inbound trains 718, 720, 722 & 746 will not stop at Back Bay & Ruggles. 

Trains 741, 720, 722 & 746 will board at the upper platform at Readville.

Last Updated: Jun 10 2019 11:47 AM


The current Franklin Schedule PDF can be found here
https://cdn.mbta.com/sites/default/files/route_pdfs/2019-spring/2019-05-20-franklin-accessible.pdf

trying to make sense of the announcement, the circle trains will NOT STOP  at Ruggles and BackBay from June 13 through June 25
trying to make sense of the announcement, the circle trains will NOT STOP
at Ruggles and BackBay from June 13 through June 25


Monday, June 10, 2019

Public Hearings - Planning Board - June 17


  • 40 Alpine Row
In accordance with the Town of Franklin Zoning By-Laws, the Franklin Planning Board will hold a public hearing on Monday, June 17, 2019 at 7:05 PM in the Town Council Chambers of the Franklin Municipal Building, 355 East Central Street, for a Special Permit and Site Plan application titled "As-Built Brewing, 40 Alpine Row" prepared by Guerriere & Halnon, Inc, Franklin, MA, and submitted to the Department of Planning & Community Development by As-Built Brewing LLC, 279 East Central Street, Franklin, MA 02038

The site is located at 40 Alpine Row in the Downtown Zoning District (Assessors Map 279, Lots 181 & 182). The purpose of the Special Permit is to allow Brewery with Tasting Room under 185 Attachment 4, Use Regulations Schedule Part Ill, Section 3.13 — Brewery with Tasting Room.

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/franklinma/files/agendas/public_hearing_notice_-_40_alpine.pdf


  • 195 Main St, Hayward Manor

In accordance with the Town of Franklin Zoning By-Laws, the Franklin Planning Board will hold a public hearing on Monday, June 17, 2019 at 7:15 PM in the Town Council Chambers of the Franklin Municipal Building, 355 East Central Street, for a Special Permit & Site Plan Modification application titled "195 Main St, Hayward Manor" prepared and submitted to the Franklin Department of Planning & Community Development by Anglican Church of the Redeemer, Inc., 31 Hayward St, Franklin, MA 02038.

The site is located at 195 Main Street in the Rural Residential I Zoning District (Assessors Map 268, Lot 236). The purpose of the Special Permit and Site Plan Modification is for transfer of ownership of the property, to allow office use on the first and second floor.

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/franklinma/files/agendas/public_hearing_notice_-_195_main.pdf


  • Site Plan 1256 West Central St

In accordance with the Town of Franklin Zoning By-Laws, the Franklin Planning Board will hold a public hearing on Monday, June 17, 2019 at 7:20 PM in the Town Council Chambers of the Franklin Municipal Building, 355 East Central Street, for a Special Permit & Site Plan Modification application titled "Site Plan 1256 West Central St" submitted to the Franklin Department of Planning & Community Development by GTE Franklin, LLC, 120 Bergeron Way, Stoughton, MA 02072.

The site is located at 1256 West Street in the Industrial Zoning District (Assessors Map 274, Lot 001). The purpose of the Special Permit and Site Plan Modification is to allow non-medical marijuana facility under 185 Attachment 3, Part Il Section 2.23 of Franklin's Zoning By-Law.

https://www.franklinma.gov/sites/franklinma/files/agendas/public_hearing_notice-_1256_west_central_street.pdf

Copies of the plan and supporting documentation may be reviewed in the Department of Planning & Community Development during regular office hours.

Please note: This will be your only written notice of this public hearing. Should the Planning Board vote to continue this Public Hearing, the date and time will be posted on the Planning Board's website under Agendas.

Please contact the Department of Planning & Community Development at (508) 520-4907 if you require further information or if you need to make arrangements to provide translation services for the hearing impaired, or for persons with language barriers.

Anthony Padula, Chairman

As Built Brewing (Facebook image)
As Built Brewing (Facebook image)


Quick survey results: Wednesday evening better than Saturday morning

Thanks for the participating in the quick survey on when to best schedule a meeting so that you attend.

Half the responses indicate a weekday night with Saturday morning running second and Saturday afternoon the least optimal.

Quick survey results: Wednesday evening better than Saturday morning
Quick survey results: Wednesday evening better than Saturday morning

Of the weekday evenings, Wednesday is the most popular followed by Monday and then Tuesday. I would further qualify the nights as Wednesday (not a Town Council meeting night) as well as Tuesday (not a School Committee night) to be the best options.

Quick survey results: Wednesday evening better than Monday, Tuesday
Quick survey results: Wednesday evening better than Monday, Tuesday

The survey itself, now closed to additional responses
https://www.franklinmatters.org/2019/06/quick-survey-on-when-to-schedule.html

Franklin (MA) School Committee meeting recap of May 28, 2019

The School Committee meeting of May 28, 2019 is summarized as follows:

Retiree Recognition
  • Debra Kroeber / JFK Teacher
  • Christine Mahan / ASMS Teacher
  • Sandra Morris / ASMS Teacher
  • Caryn Parnell / ASMS Teacher
  • Peter Pasquarosa / HMMS / Health-PE Teacher
  • Eleanor Prindeville / ASMS Cafeteria Worker
  • Mary Sandford / Parmenter Teacher
  • Marushka Waters / FHS Theater Teacher
  • Beth Wittcoff / ASMS Principal
  • Kathleen Woods / FHS Guidance Counselor


There was discussion around the superintendents evaluation.

There was an update on the School Start Times - audio of that segment was shared separately  https://www.franklinmatters.org/2019/05/fm-163-school-start-times-update.html

The district improvement plan was also updated with current status and accomplishments
https://www.franklinps.net/district/news/district-improvement-plan-update-communication-52819

Document released for this agenda can be found on the Town of Franklin page
https://www.franklinps.net/district/meeting-packets/pages/school-committee-packet-52819


Additional details can be found in my notes recorded live during the meeting:

view from the back of the room at the May 28 School Committee meeting
view from the back of the room at the May 28 School Committee meeting

Register O'Donnell Reports Uptick in Norfolk County Real Estate Activity


Norfolk County Registry of Deeds

Register O'Donnell Reports Uptick in Norfolk County Real Estate Activity

While the weather in May was starting to get slightly warmer, so too was the Norfolk County real estate market, according to Register of Deeds William P. O'Donnell.

The Register noted that a noticeable uptick in both real estate sales and lending transactions happened last month. "Specifically, during the month of May, Norfolk County real estate sales, both residential and commercial, totaled 1,742, a healthy 7% increase year over year."

While real estate transactions increased, the average real estate price, again both residential and commercial, was $702,071, a 16% decrease compared to May 2018. Also, total dollar real estate sales volume decreased 13% to $786.3 million. However, according to O'Donnell, these figures can be attributed to two big commercial sales last year of $61 million and $70 million that skewed the numbers.

Lending activity in Norfolk County also rose during the month of May. "The number of mortgages recorded against County properties increased 6% year over year. The increases in real estate sales and mortgage transactions clearly tell us that the market is definitely loosening up due in part to increased real estate inventory. Sustaining the available inventory numbers will be a key component in ensuring that the Norfolk County real estate market continues its push in a positive direction," noted O'Donnell.

The month of May also saw Norfolk County homeowners continuing to take advantage of the Homestead Act. During May, a total of 1,160 Homesteads were recorded, a 5% increase compared to May 2018. Register O'Donnell spoke about the importance of recording a Homestead Act against your primary property. "A Homestead is an important consumer tool that provides limited protection against the forced sale of an individual's primary residence to satisfy unsecured debt up to $500,000," stated the Register.

Another good sign for the market has been the reduction in foreclosure activity during the past several months. The number of foreclosure deeds recorded in the county during May was 4, a significant 75% decrease compared to May 2018. In addition, the number of Notice to Foreclose Mortgage recordings, the first step in the foreclosure process, was 41, a 38% decrease year over year.

Register O'Donnell noted that the Norfolk County Registry of Deeds continues to partner with non-profit agencies Quincy Community Action Programs, 617-479-8181 x376 and NeighborWorks Housing Solutions, a new entity recently created by the merger of NeighborWorks Southern Massachusetts and Housing Solutions for Southeastern Massachusetts. For assistance, you can call NeighborWorks Housing Solutions at 508-587-0950.

Both NeighborWorks Housing Solutions and Quincy Community Action Programs are staffed with professionals that can help someone who has received a Notice to Foreclose Mortgage document. Another option is to contact the Massachusetts Attorney General's Consumer Advocacy and Response Division (CARD) at 617-727-8400.

Concluding his remarks, Register O'Donnell noted, "The increase in May's sales and lending activity, coupled with a larger pool of available housing, gives me guarded optimism to believe that the Norfolk County real estate market is heading for a good summer run. Another factor that should help is the continued stabilizing of interest rates by the Fed which we've seen during the last quarter."

To learn more about these and other Registry of Deeds events and initiatives, like us at facebook.com/NorfolkDeeds or follow us on twitter.com/NorfolkDeeds and/or Instagram.com/NorfolkDeeds.

The Norfolk County Registry of Deeds is located at 649 High Street in Dedham. The Registry is a resource for homeowners, title examiners, mortgage lenders, municipalities and others with a need for secure, accurate, accessible land record information. All land record research information can be found on the Registry's website www.norfolkdeeds.org. Residents in need of assistance can contact the Registry of Deeds Customer Service Center via telephone at (781) 461-6101, or email us at registerodonnell@norfolkdeeds.org.


Register William P. O'Donnell
Norfolk County Registry of Deeds

email: registerodonnell@norfolkdeeds.org
phone: 781-234-3336
Norfolk County Registry of Deeds, 649 High Street, Dedham,, MA 02026-1831

Sent by registerodonnell@norfolkdeeds.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!


Register O'Donnell Reports Uptick in Norfolk County Real Estate Activity
Register O'Donnell Reports Uptick in Norfolk County Real Estate Activity

Sunday, June 9, 2019

Franklin, MA: School Committee - Agenda - June 11, 2019

Vision Statement
The Franklin Public Schools will foster within its students the knowledge and skills to find and achieve satisfaction in life as productive global citizens.

A G E N D A
“The listing of matters are those reasonably anticipated by the Chair which may be discussed at the meeting. Not all items listed may in fact be discussed and other items not listed may also be brought up for discussion to the extent permitted by law.”

1. Routine Business
a. Review of Agenda
b. Citizen’s Comments
i. In the spirit of open communication, “the School Committee will hear public comment not related to an agenda item at the beginning of each regular School Committee Meeting. The Committee will listen to, but not respond to any comment made. A Committee member may add an agenda item to a future meeting as a result of a citizen comment” – from Policy BEDH
c. FHS Student Representative Comments
d. Superintendent’s Report

2. Guests / Presentations
a. Franklin Education Foundation
b. SEPAC Update
c. Student Services Update – Paula Marano

3. Discussion / Action Items
a. BICO Collaborative Board Appointment
I recommend the appointment of Dr. Sara Ahern to the BICO Board for the 2019-
2020 school year.
b. ACCEPT Collaborative Board Appointment
I recommend the appointment of Dr. Sara Ahern to the ACCEPT Board for the
2019-2020 school year.
c. Policy – First Reading
I recommend Policy BGC – Policy Review and Revision return for second
reading at the next meeting.

4. Discussion Only Items
a. none

5. Information Matters
a. School Committee Sub-Committee Reports (e.g. Budget; Community Relations;
Policy; Transportation; Public Schools Advocacy; Ad Hoc Superintendent’s
Evaluation)
b. School Committee Liaison Reports (e.g. Joint PCC; Substance Abuse Task
Force; School Wellness Advisory Council [SWAC]; School Start Times Advisory
Committee [SSTAC], MASC)

6. New Business
a. To discuss any future agenda items

7. Consent Agenda
a. Minutes
I recommend approval of the minutes of your May 28, 2019 School Committee meeting as detailed.
b. Districtwide Gift
I recommend acceptance of a check for $330.00 from BJ’s Wholesale Club for inhouse enrichment districtwide as detailed.
c. Keller Gift
I recommend acceptance of a check for $250.13 from O’Connor Studios for inhouse enrichment at Keller Elementary School as detailed.
d. Davis Thayer Gift
I recommend acceptance of a check for $165.93 from O’Connor Studios for inhouse enrichment at Davis Thayer Elementary School as detailed.
e. Remington Gift
I recommend acceptance of a check for $98.50 from Lifetouch National School Studios for in-house enrichment at Remington Middle School as detailed.
f. FHS Scholarship
I recommend acceptance of a check for $2,000.00 from Peter Baglioni for the Fernando P. Baglioni scholarship at FHS.

8. Payment of Bills Dr. Bergen

9. Payroll Mrs. Douglas

10. Correspondence 
– Budget To Actual – Miriam Goodman

11. Executive Session
a. Pursuant to M.G.L. c. 30A, §21(a)(3) to discuss strategy with respect to collective bargaining with the FEA/RN unit as an open meeting may have a detrimental effect on the bargaining position of the School Committee and the chair so declares.

12. Adjournment

The PDF version of this agenda can be found
https://www.franklinps.net/sites/franklinmaps/files/uploads/scagenda_6-11-19.pdf

Other documents released for this agenda can be found
https://www.franklinps.net/district/meeting-packets/pages/june-11-2019-school-committee-packet

screen grab of the live broadcast by Panther TV of the FHS Class of 2019 Graduation
screen grab of the live broadcast by Panther TV of the FHS Class of 2019 Graduation

FHS baseball and softball teams win to advance in playoffs

Via HockomockSports, we share the results of the FHS sports playoff action on Saturday, June 8, 2019.


Baseball = Super 8 = #4 Lowell, 1 @ #1 Franklin, 7 – Final
– Franklin junior Liam Dailey had one of his performances of his career, nearly going the distance to lead the Panthers to a win over Lowell in the elimination bracket of the Super 8, keeping his team’s season alive. Dailey pitched 8.2 innings, allowing one run on six hits and two walks while striking out eight. Franklin scored two runs in the second, once in the third, fourth, and sixth, and two more in the eighth. Scott Elliott had three hits, including a double, drove in two runs and scored twice while Jake Macchi was 3-for-3 with two doubles, a run, and an RBI for the Panthers. Franklin will look to extend its season when it takes on St. John’s Prep on Monday at Campanelli Stadium with a time to be determined.

Softball = D1 South = #11 Franklin, 9 @ #6 Braintree, 3 – Final
– Braintree cut the deficit to just one run in the sixth inning but Franklin put the game away with five runs in the top of the seventh to earn the upset on the road. The Panthers and Wamps each scored twice in the second but Franklin regained the lead by scoring once in each the third and fourth. Ally Shea had three hits and drove in two runs, Gabby Colace had a pair of hits and scored three runs, and Maggie Hobby had two hits, two RBI, and a run scored. Jackie Cherry had a strong performance in the circle, allowing three runs on six hits while striking out eight. Franklin will travel to #3 Bishop Feehan on Monday at 4:00.

For other results around the Hockomock League
https://hockomocksports.com/saturdays-schedule-scoreboard-06-08-19/

Baseball = Super 8 updated bracket
Baseball = Super 8 updated bracket

In the News: FHS graduation; farmers markets in season

From the Milford Daily News, articles of interest for Franklin:

"With college on the horizon and visions of a bright future looming, Franklin High School graduates turned their tassels to formally end their high school experience. 
During the graduation ceremony on Friday night, seniors took their seats for a final time. 
Principal Paul Peri touted valedictorian Alexandra Krylova’s accomplishments, saying she never once scored less than a 94 in any course, and completed 13 Advanced Placement courses. 
“Alex will undoubtedly accomplish all that she sets out to do,” Peri said."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190608/franklin-high-grads-told-to-look-to-future

Catch the replay of the graduation broadcast by Panther TV
https://youtu.be/QQIwj7iMtSE

screen grab of the live broadcast by Panther TV
screen grab of the live broadcast by Panther TV
Farmers Markets in MA
"Looking for a spot to pick up fresh farm vegetables, honey, cheese, meat and other delicious delicacies? You’re in luck, because several communities are kicking off their summer farmers markets this month. 
Ashland’s opening day was Saturday, with farmers markets continuing each week on that day through mid-September. Each week carries a different theme, activities for children and entertainment to be performed on the Ashland Arts Alliance stage. 
Hopkinton’s farmers market starts on Sunday on the Hopkinton Common (corner of Marathon Way and Ash Street). Farmers markets will run from 1-5 p.m. on Sundays through Oct. 13."

Continue reading the article online (subscription may be required)
https://www.milforddailynews.com/news/20190608/farmers-markets-in-full-bloom

MA.gov has an interactive map showing the farmers markets
https://massnrc.org/farmlocator/map.aspx?Type=Farmers%20Markets

Farmers Markets in MA
Farmers Markets in MA

Franklin Garden Club Thanks Local Organizations for Support

Pierina DAscenzo
Pierina DAscenzo
More than 40 senior citizens, including Franklin resident Pierina DAscenzo, shown in photo, created beautiful floral arrangements at a recent ArtWeek activity co-sponsored by the Franklin Garden Club and Franklin Senior Center. 

The Club supplied containers, flowers and instructions, while members assisted the participants in creating the arrangements. The Senior Center helped to recruit participants and provided snacks for the event. 

In addition to the Senior Center, the Franklin Garden Club also wishes to thank Big Y, Hillside Nursery, and Franklin Mill Store for their support which contributed to the success of the event.


Franklin (MA) School Committee recap - May 14, 2019

Catching up to the School Committee meeting recap for the May 14, 2019 session.


  • The Middle and High School education goals and improvement plans updated
  • first reading of policies on Physical Restraint of Students and Emotional Support Dogs were held
  • The School Start Time Advisory Committee was formally dissolved (as planned), the next meeting will have additional info on the planning the School District is continuing to conduct
  • School Choice was approved to NOT accept students again this year
  • The calendar of meetings for the School Committee was approved for 2019-2020


Additional details can be found in my notes as recorded live during the meeting



Documents released for this meeting can be found

The Franklin TV video can be viewed on demand

Davis Thayer school sign
Davis Thayer school sign

Franklin (MA) Town Council - May 8, 2019 - meeting recap

Catching up to some of the meeting summaries that I missed posting, here is the recap for the May 8, 2019 meeting

  • A  bunch of residents from the Skyline Drive neighborhood complained about the shrinking the road surface and reduction of sidewalks in their neighborhood.
  • Roberta Trahan was appointed to the Cultural District Committee
  • La Cantina received approval for their liquor license to be used at the Farmer Market
  • A presentation and overview of the senior housing expansion proposed for near Eaton Place.
  • The legislative delegation: Senator Spilka, Senator Rausch and Representative Roy appeared to provide updates on legislation and the State budget process.

Additional details can be found in my notes recorded live during the meeting


Senator Spilka, Senator Rausch and Representative Roy appeared to provide updates on legislation and the State budget process
Senator Spilka, Senator Rausch and Representative Roy appeared to provide updates on
legislation and the State budget process

senior housing expansion proposed for near Eaton Place
senior housing expansion proposed for near Eaton Place

MassBudget: What is the Actual State Cost of MassHealth?



  MASSBudget     KidsCount
June 7, 2019




What is the Actual State Cost of MassHealth?

Every month, the MassHealth program (Massachusetts' Medicaid program) provides health insurance for more than 1.8 million residents of the Commonwealth: children in low-income households; low-wage workers; elders in nursing homes; people with disabilities; and others with very low incomes who cannot afford insurance. This is more than one-quarter of the Commonwealth's population, including close to half the state's children. Not surprisingly, such a comprehensive program represents a large share of the state's budget. But how much?
Since Medicaid is a partnership between state and federal governments, much of this essential health care coverage is actually paid for by the federal government. MassBudget's new fact sheet, written for the Massachusetts Medicaid Policy Institute, explains that the Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 budget includes approximately $16.7 billion for MassHealth. This total (or "gross" amount) is approximately 36 percent of total state budget appropriations. The federal government then reimburses Massachusetts for more than half this spending. After receiving these reimbursements, the state's net cost for MassHealth is $8.3 billion, 24 percent of the total net budget.
http://massbudget.org/reports/pdf/MassHealth_2019.pdf
MassBudget: What is the Actual State Cost of MassHealth?
Read the full MassBudget fact sheet on the actual cost of MassHealth here

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center (MassBudget) produces policy research, analysis, and data-driven recommendations focused on improving the lives of low- and middle-income children and adults, strengthening our state's economy, and enhancing the quality of life in Massachusetts.

MASSACHUSETTS BUDGET AND POLICY CENTER
15 COURT SQUARE, SUITE 700
BOSTON, MA 02108




Sent by nwagman@massbudget.org in collaboration with
Constant Contact
Try email marketing for free today!


--
Stephen Sherlock

Community Information Director (volunteer) for FranklinMAtters.org/